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WWI - SERVICE PERSONNEL FROM THE LWR BROADHEATH AREA

1914-1918 THE GREAT WAR - SERVICE PERSONNEL FROM THE 
LOWER BROADHEATH AREA

Albert James AGG, Despatch Rider, Corporal, Sergeant
Service Nos. 74971 & 2311366, Royal Engineers, & Royal Signals

Albert was born in Worcestershire (Martley district)  30 July  1891.  He lived with a relative, James Agg, a retired Policeman, wife Francis, and their daughter, Emily, in a cottage in Martley Road, Lower Broadheath.  In 1914 he married Margaret Harriet Lunn at Kings Norton.  (Harriet was a housemaid at Heath Grange, Hallow).   His service record cannot be found, except for his Medal Card.  He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British Medals.  He died March 1979 aged 88 yrs.
He is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall
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John Thomas ALLEN, Private
Service No. 27046 (?), 2nd/8th/9th Worcs Regiment

Worcs. Archives - Pte J Allen joined 9th Worcesters Jan 1916, embarked to Mesopotamia May 1916, fought in battle of Baghdad and Jerusalem, invalided from Mesopotamia to India with fever - dysentery. PRISONER OF WAR. (Lived at Temple Laugherne, Broadheath) Some confusion whether JT or T was a prisoner of war.
He is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall

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Harry AMERSON, Leading Stoker
Service Nos.103466 & K11956, HMS Superb, HMS Zulu & HMS Venerable

Harry was born on 20 January 1877 in Birmingham, and he lived at Knoll Cottages, Green Lane, Broadheath.  His name is on the Roll of Honour, Broadheath Village Hall, and the Absent Voters list 1919.  Harry joined the RN for 12 years on 9 July 1906.  His record also shows that he (sic) ‘vol’ (volunteered?) 8 July 1911.  This is the record that was looked at.  In 1911 he was in Portsmouth as 1st Class Stoker.  From May 1913 to April 1915 he had transferred to HMS Superb (a Bellerophon-type battleship) and was now Leading Stoker.  In July 1914 the ship transferred to Scapa Flow initially as part of the First Battle Squadron.   While serving on HMS Zulu, the ship was hit by a German submarine on 8 November 1916.  The stern was sunk but the front section was salvaged and attached to the (torpedoed) stern section of HMS Nubian which was then re-named HMS Zubian and commissioned June 1917.  Harry also served from June to November 1917 on HMS Onslaught, an M Class Destroyer.  From April 1918 to February 1919, Harry was attached to his last’ ship’, HMS Venerable, a land depot.

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Alfred Charles ANTHONY, Lance Corporal
Service No. P/1335, Military Foot Police

Alfred was born in 1888 and was from Broadheath. The Military Police numbered about 25,000 during WWI and most served on the Western Front. http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-on-land/113-general-interest/806-police-western-front.html.  It has not been possible to locate Alfred’s military record but his Medal Card indicates that he was awarded all three WWI medals 1915 Star, Victory and British, known as “Peep, Squeak and Wilfred”.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall

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Albert Ethelbert BEARD, Corporal
Service Nos. 3302 / 240967, 8th Worcs Regiment

Albert Ethelbert Beard was born in 1889 and is shown on the 1911 census as a 21 year old draper’s porter living at 80 Sidbury, Worcester with his parents William and Annie Beard and five brothers & sisters. His connection to Broadheath is not yet known.

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Charles Thomas BEESTON,
Service No. 67573, Worcs Regiment

Charles Beeston was born in Quinton in 1899. At the time of the 1911 census he was living in Pingle Field Barn Cottage, Shenstone, Staffordshire with his widowed mother and brothers, Albert and Reginald, and sister Ethel, in the home of Mrs Beeston’s stepson Francis L Collins, a 26 year old cowman.  Another stepson Frederick Collins also lived there. Charles was the son of John and Elizabeth Beeston. On the 1901 census Bromsgrove Frederick Collins, who was born in Hallow was already living with the Beestons as a stepson, along with his brother George.  Frank Collins was living next door with his parents George and Elizabeth Collins. This establishes a link to our area. Francis and Frederick may have been related to John Collins who lived with his family on The Green at Hallow in 1911.  Charles’ WWI military record has not survived but we do know from the Royal Tank Corps Enlistment Records that he joined the Royal Tank Corps (1 Depot) on 6 October 1922.Service number 5240472.  He was a motor mechanic and enlisted at Worcester. Charles gave his next of kin as his brother Reginald, who lived in Antler, Saskatchewan, Canada (current population about 40) Another column shows Charles’ previous military service was in the Worcestershire Regiment from 18 June 1917 until 31 March 1922. He received the British War Medal and Victory Medal. There is also mention of the Royal Engineers, but it is not clear where that fits in to his service. Charles had a chequered career with the Tank Corps at one point being promoted to Lance Corporal, he was deemed to have deserted in 1925, but rejoined in 1930 finally being discharged as no longer being required in 1931.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Arthur BIGGERSTAFF,
Service Nos. 74378 & TR/7/6121, 4th Btn Worcs Rgt/93rd Btn Training Reserve (1916)

Arthur Biggerstaff was born at Broadheath on the 21 November 1899, the third of four sons of Alfred and Harriet Biggerstaff who lived in Martley Road at the time of the 1911 census. His youngest brother Albert was born in 1910 and so did not serve during WWI. Arthur worked as a porter at Maypole Dairy and enlisted on 7th October 1916 aged 17 years 321 days. His service record indicates that he was on Home Service from February to May 29th 1917 having been posted to the 93rd Battalion Training Reserve and was discharged as permanently unfit due to debility. He was awarded a £15 gratuity. The details of his medical discharge are such that it surprising to find that he was called up in 1918 to serve in the 4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, (SN 74378). He was medically examined again on 11th September 1919 (stet) and subsequently medically discharged in December 1919.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Reginald and William noted below)
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Reginald BIGGERSTAFF, Driver
Service Nox. 3352 & 845712, S.Mid. Bde RFA & 306 Bde Royal Field Artillery, Worcester

Reginald Herbert Biggerstaff was born in St Johns, Worcester on 7 May 1893, the eldest son of Alfred and Harriet Biggerstaff, he was a farm labourer at the time of the 1911 census. It seems that his name has been mis-transcribed in some records as Bickerstaff. He married Christine/a Hope in 1916 and they had two daughters during the war. His military record also survives under the name Bickerstaff although he clearly signed the attestation form on 31 May 1915 as R Biggerstaff. (The witness was J Hope). Reginald was 5ft 11in tall, weighed 11st 3 lb and had good eyesight, he had a slight variocele for which he refused to have an operation, this affected his ability to work whilst in the Army. He was classed as a driver throughout the War and in 1916 served with the S Mid Bgde, which became known as the 61st. Reginald was in the DAC (Division Ammunition Column). For information concerning the 61st in France go to the “Long, Long Trial website http://www.1914-1918.net/61div.htm . In March 1916 Reginald contracted the contagious skin infection scabies and spent 11 days in Fargo Hospital on Salisbury Plain. In 1917 he suffered three bouts of impetigo whilst in Doullens, France. The Army gave him instruction in concrete work in the June of 1918 and on the 16 November he was posted to 306 Brigade as a driver (SN 845712). He was granted 2 weeks leave in Boulogne on 14th December 1918 but was admitted to hospital in Abbeville in January 1919 with “mild” influenza and a derangement of the knee. Reginald was part of the sick convoy from France which arrived at to 1st Birmingham War Hospital in Rednal on 25 January. About the time of Reginald’s demobilisation on 26 April 1919 he claimed unsuccessfully for a disability, “Dis Cartilage right knee”, which was attributable to his war service. He gave his home address as Lovington, Lower Broadheath. Reginald was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal. There is a reference to man of this name in the GWR Employment records, but there are no on-line details other than the name, so any additional information would be welcome. Reginald died in 1978 and again he appears incorrectly in the General Registrar Office Death Index as Reginald Bickerstaff.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Arthur, above and William, below are also recorded)

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William Alfred BIGGERSTAFF, Private
Died of his wounds 14th May 1917
Service No. 32792, 2nd Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

William was born in 1895, son of Mrs H Biggerstaff of Lwr Broadheath.  He died of wounds 14 May 1917.  (He had broken a bone in his lower leg, above his boot, and this was healing well when he suddenly collapsed and died from an aneurism - PN June 1917). He is buried in St Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France, Grave P.II.O.12B.  (He lived at Lovington, Broadheath) and his name is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  The  Lincolnshire Archives hold the War diary for his battalion.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Arthur and William are noted above)

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James Meredith BLACKFORD, Private, Promoted to 2nd Lieutenant after the war
Service No. GS/55005, 4th Royal Fusiliers X Co., 8 Platoon B.E.F. France

James Meredith Blackford 1895 – 1983 was born in Worcester the grandson of James Meredith who farmed at The Knoll, in Lower Broadheath. James was a private SN GS/55005 in the Royal Fusiliers who was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant after the War in about April 1919. His name appears on Broadheath Roll of Honour in village hall. Nothing more is known about this serviceman at the moment.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Frederick Charles BOAZ, Private
Killed in action 24th October, 1918
Service No. 63518, 1st/8th Worcs Regiment

Frederick was born in St Johns, Worcester c.1888, one of ten children born to Thomas (a farmer) and Esther Jane Boaz nee Henry, of Partridge Farm, Broadheath. Frederick was a journeyman butcher living in Uttoxeter Staffordshire at the time of the 1911 census.  His military record has not survived so it is not known when he joined the 1 / 8th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment.  He was killed in action aged 30 years, on 24th October 1918, and buried in Forest Communal Cemetery, France, Grave A.1. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Leonard is noted below)
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Leonard BOAZ, 104th Regt. Canada

Leonard was born in St Johns, Worcester c. 1890, and had 6 brothers and 2 sisters. His parents were Thomas (farmer) and Esther Jane Boaz, of Partridge Farm, Broadheath. He is noted in the Parish Magazine of August 1915.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Frederick is noted above)
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Herbert Ernest BOSLEY,
Service No.11142, 2nd Bttn. Worc Regiment

Herbert was the son of Herbert and Annie of Heath Lane, Lower Broadheath.  He appears on the 1911 census as the stepson of Frank and Annie Maylett of Bell Lane, Broadheath.  Herbert was wounded by shrapnel 2 October 1914 and was invalided out of further service.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Reginald is noted below)
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Reginald BOSLEY, Ordinary Seaman
Service No. SS/4269.
Killed in action 26th November 1914
Service No. SS/4269, HMS Victor/HMS Bulwark

Article published in the 
Worcester Daily Times, 4th Decemer 1914


Reginald was born on 20 September 1892 at Penarth, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Thomas and Annie of Heath Lane, Lower Broadheath.  He appears on the 1911 census as the stepson of Frank and Annie Maylett of Bell Lane, Broadheath.  A butcher by trade Reginald joined the Royal Navy on 30 April 1913. He was an Ordinary Seaman with the land base Victory I at Portsmouth before joining HMS Bulwark in June 1914. Herbert was killed on 26 November 1914 on HMS Bulwark, moored at Sheerness, when the ship’s ammunition exploded with the loss of over 700 lives.


His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Herbert noted above)
























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John BRAILEE, Private
Service No. 14704, 13th Royal Warwickshire Regt.

Born Worcester, and resident of Broadheath, John died suddenly at Blandford, Dorset on 3 February 1916 while on home service.  He was buried in the SE corner of Tarrant Monkton (All Saints) Churchyard, Dorset.  The inscription reads “Erected by Officers and men of the 13th Royal Warwickshire Regt. To the memory of Pte John Brailee who died on service at Blandford February 3rd 1916, aged 38 years”.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Charles Richard BRITTEN, M.C., O.B.E., Lt. Captain, Commander, Brigadier
1st/2nd/3rd Btn. Grenadier Guards/1st London Territorials and Home Guard

Born 25 June 1894 in Kenswick House, Paddington, London, his father Richard was a retired Rear Admiral, and his mother was Blanche Cecile Colville, daughter of Charles John Colville, 1st Viscount Colville of Culross and Hon. Cecil Katherine Mary Carrington.  After attending Eton and Sandhurst, he joined the Grenadier Guards in December 1914 and served in France until December 1920.   He was invalided by Paratyphoid Fever (1915) and shot twice, in his lung (1916 - Battle of the Somme) and elbow (1917 - Battle of Cambrai).   He returned to service in Egypt 1933-37 and took command of the Regiment and the London Territorials and Home Guard at the outbreak of WWII.   He married twice, to Dorothy Allsopp in November 1915, and Pam Attenborough at the beginning of WWII.  He was awarded the Military Cross in November 1950  and the O.B.E. in  March 1952.  He also received the Victory and British War medals and the 1914-15 Star.   He died 4 Feb 1984 aged 89 yrs.  To read his individual history click here.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Forester noted below)
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Forester Cecil Robin BRITTEN, J.P., Lieutenant Colonel / Captain
1st Bttn. Coldstream Guards, 67th Division.

Born 10 March 1893 in Kenswick House, Paddington, London, his father Richard was a retired Rear Admiral, his mother was Blanche Cecile Colville, daughter of Charles John Colville, 1st Viscount Colville of Culross and Hon. Cecil Katherine Mary Carrington. He married Dorothy Cartwright Toler 3 Sept 1915 at Chipping Sodbury, Glos. who died January 1925. He then married Evelyn Zoe Rhodes James in Worcester Cathedral, 13 August 1925, whom he later divorced, and married Beryl Bowyer on the Isle of Wight, September 1966. He died 13 April 1972, Isle of Wight. (His name is first noted in the August 1915 Parish Magazine).  He  lived at Kenswick Manor, and his name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.)  We are unable to find his service history. He was awarded the 1914 Star, 1914 Clasp & Roses, British and Victory Medals. 
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Arthur Henry CALLOW, Corporal
Killed in action 27th August 1917
Service No. 240419, 2nd/8th Worcs Regt

In 1891 Arthur’s parents were lodging with the Yarnold family who ran to Old Crown Beerhouse at Peachley in Hallow parish. By 1911 the family had grown and Arthur had a younger brother Alfred aged 8.  Arthur was a Private with the 2/8th Worcestershire Regiment. In 1917 the Worcesters were fighting in the Battle of Ypres and in August were involved in heavy fighting on the Steenbeck. (See “The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War” by Stacke).  Arthur died on 27 August 1917 at the age of 20. He is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery Grave IV.G.13
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Bertie William CALLOW,
Service No. J/5253,  HMS Cornwall/HMS Mentor

22 August 1892 – 1974:  Bertie was born at Holt and joined the Navy as a boy in 1909.  He was on the training ship Ganges II and several other ships and shore establishments until at the age of 18 when he enlisted for 12 years. By the start of WWI he was serving on HMS Cornwall, http://www.naval-history.net/OWShips-WW1-05-HMS_Cornwall.htm first as an Able Seaman and later in 1916 as a Leading Seaman. The armoured cruiser had a crew of nearly 700. It sailed from Devonport on 2 August 1914 and the day war broke out she captured her first prize Syra, a German tramp steamer. A synopsis of a young midshipman’s journal on the Cornwall, which is held in the Imperial War Museum Department of Documents, can be viewed here: 
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/rd/a1da50ed-dc21-42c4-b875-0f4e391583b1 It sheds light on life on board ship – the patrols, monotony of night watch, and the discomforts of sea life.  On 8 December 1914 HMS Cornwall saw action under Captain W M Ellerton off the Falkland Islands when,  with HMS Glasgow, they made successful pursuit and sank the German battleship Leipzig, part of the German East Asiatic Squadron. In 1915 HMS Cornwall was blockading in the East African campaign and later the same year was part of the East Mediterranean Squadron. From January 1916 to March 1917 the Cornwall was on the China station. In March 1916 became a Leading Seaman and between November 1916 and January 1917, he was posted to HMS Defiance, the Royal Navy Torpedo School. From there Bertie was attached to HMS Dido, which was a depot ship for the destroyer flotillas at Harwich. He was serving on HMS Mentor a Class M Destroyer from January 1917 until March 1919. Bertie was subsequently attached to several shore establishments both in Devonport and elsewhere in the UK, including HMS Columbine, a shore based destroyer depot on the Firth of Forth. His 12 years service ended in May 1922 in Devonport attached to the shore establishment Vivid I.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Leonard Charles CALLOW, Driver
Service Nos. 3020 and 831020, 61 Div. A.C. Royal Field Artillery, Worcester

Leonard was born in 1894 in Broadheath, Hallow the son of William and Matilda Callow.  In 1911 Leonard was working as a farm labourer for George Knight at Morcroft Farm, Grimley. He attested on 18 January 1915 with the 2nd South Midland (Reserve) Brigade RFA and was embodied on the same date.  He was posted to 61st DAC (Division Ammunition Column)  part of the 61st Division (2nd South Midland)  on   10 September 1916 and was sent to France where the Division was being used to hold trench lines. In 1917 the Germans withdrew to the Hindenburg Line and the 61st Division was sent in cautious pursuit and on 17th March 1917 Chaulnes and Bapaume were captured. More information about 61st Division in 1917 and 1918 can be read here, including the first phases of the First Battles of the Somme 1918 and the Battles of the Lys and the final advance into Picardy:-  http://www.1914-1918.net/61div.html

Leonard received “Regimental Pay - Professional Pay Class II” in January 1917 and Class I in December of the same year. Details of his pay are mentioned in his Army Service record - 29 September 1917, 2d per diem which was increased in January 1918 to 3d a day.  Leonard seems to have only been on leave twice, firstly in November 1917 (before the Cambrai operations), when he was granted 15 days leave with ration allowance and again for 15 days after the Armistice when the Division had withdrawn to the Cambrai area.  Leonard returned on 6 December 1918.  He was appointed Lance Bombardier on 6 January 1919. Leonard attended his pre-demobilisation Medical at Outrebois, Picardy on 13 June 1919 but it would be another month before he was disembodied on demobilisation, that was when he gave his home address as Lower Broadheath. Leonard was awarded the Victory Medal. In 1921 he married Amy Weaver daughter of William and Sarah Weaver from Broadheath. Leonard died in 1968.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Albert CHAMBERS, Private
Service No. 263099,  2nd/8th Worcs Regt.

Albert Chambers was born in 1894 in Broadheath, the son of John and Jane Chambers who, in 1911, lived at Peachley Cottage, Broadheath with their three sons . All of the men were general labourers.  Albert’s Army service record has not survived, but his medal card states that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. The Parish Magazine states that he was a Prisoner of War and the Absent Voters List for 1919 shows he was living at Peachley.
His name is included on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

NB:  This photograph is captioned only as Pte Chambers, so we are unable to establish whether this is Albert, or Robert Chambers of Comer Gardens who was reported as missing, presumed dead.
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Henry Edwin CHAMBERS, Gunner
Service No. 110220, R.G.A.

Henry Edwin Chambers was born in Broadheath in 1880, the son of Walter and Sarah Ann Chambers of Partridge Lane and later in 1911 at 40 Lambert Road, Worcester. On the 1911 census he was living with his wife Edith and daughter Doris at Jasmine Cottage Lower Broadheath. Henry’s Army Service record has not survived and all we know is that lived at Link Cottages, Broadheath. His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine in July Aug 1918. Henry’s name is included in the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Charles CHEESE, Private
Service No. 428210, 627 Ag. Co.,Agricultural Labour Corps.

Charles lived at Kenswick Lodge, Broadheath.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  We have not been able to trace his service record or medal card.

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George Henry (Harry) COOPER, AB Seaman
Service No. J35096, HMS Impregnable/HMS Valiant/HMS Mersey
George is mentioned in the August 1915 Parish Magazine, and the Absent Voters List of 1918/19.  He lived at Peachley Court Farm, Broadheath, and his name is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  No other information has been found.
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Robert Dalton Stevenson CUMING,
Lieutenant (1877)/Commander(1890)/Captain (1897)/Rear Admiral (1907)/Vice Admiral (1911)/Admiral and Captain in Charge of Naval Reserve (1915)

Royal Navy (1866)- HMS Britannia/Dreadnought/Gun vessel HMY (Yacht) Falcon (1884)/Caledonia/ HMY Aries

Born 10 Sept 1852, Robert Dalton Stevenson Cuming was the second son of Colonel Cumming of Coulter, n.r Cheltenham. (He changed his surname to Cuming by deed poll in 1913.) He joined the Navy in Sept 1866 and served on HMS Britannia. He served as Lieutenant (1877- gunship Falcon) in the Sudan Campaign of 1884-85 and was awarded the Egyptian Medal and the Khedive’s Bronze Star. Having retired in 1900, he joined the War effort in 1914 assisting with recruitment, and supporting the care of wounded soldiers at Norton Barracks, and elsewhere. In 1915 he was put in command of armed yachts hunting enemy submarines in the North Sea. For this service he received the C.B.E. and D.S.O. He and his wife, Henrietta Florence (nee Gibson-Craig) moved to Worcestershire and lived from 1914 – 1919 at Eastbury Manor. (For further information, click here.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. 
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Robert F. W. CUMING, 2nd  Lieutenant,
3rd Seaforth Highlanders

Robert’s name appears on the Absent Voters list of 1919.  He lived at Eastbury Manor.  No other information has been found.
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Alfred Lionel CUMMING, 2nd Lieutenant
Killed in action 7th June 1917
General List and Royal Flying Corps.

Died aged 25 years on 7th June 1917 - son of James Henry and Ada Cumming, of Casilla, No. 978, Valparaiso. Born in Chile, Sth America. Buried in Varennes Military Cemetery, France, Grave I.K.34.
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Jane CUMMING, V.A.D. Nurse
Campden V.A. Hospital, Glos. 64

Records on the British Red Cross website show that Jane lived at Eastbury Manor, Worcester at the time of starting her service in September 1917.  She had worked as a Pantry Maid at Balleshall, Worcester for 48 days.  She served until October 1918.  No further information has been found.
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R. DAVIS

This soldier’s name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  No other information can be found.

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William Reginald John EDEN, Lance Corporal
Killed in action 18th March 1915
Service No. 9285, 1st Battalion, 6th Worcs Regt.

William was born in Cheltenham, Gloucs., and resident of Worcester, the son of William and (Fannie) Kate Eden of Gloucester.  At the time of the 1901 Census William was a page boy/servant at The Rectory, Earls Croome.   He attested in Worcester 14 September 1914, and was by then a chauffeur at Eastbury Manor.  He had married Elizabeth Tyndall in 1909 (Dursley Reg. District)  and they had 2 children (another child was born 2 months after William had died of wounds received in action.)  He was posted 5 November 1914 and died 18 March 1915 aged 31. (CWGC states 'buried Boulogne Eastern Cemetery III d 36'Berrow 24 April 1915 "Three soldier brothers Lance Corporal W Eden of Broadheath (killed) Sgt Ernest Eden (missing) and Pte Leslie Eden of the Gloucesters (now at front)(see "Croqill's" jottings - suggest contact Guy Meakins http://meakinatelmstead.me.uk/20130609-GuyMeakinTree/ps06/ps06_124.)   From September 1915, Elizabeth was given a pension of 20s 6d per week," subject to increase on notification of widow's age".  William was awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Ernest and Leslie are below)

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Ernest George EDEN, Sergeant
Killed in action 26th October 1914
Service No. 12593, 1st/8th Grenadier Guards

Ernest was born in Cheltenham, son of William and (Fannie) Kate Eden.  His mother was recorded as head of the family in the Census of 1901, and she was working as a dressmaker.  The family (sister, Emily, and younger brother, Leslie) lived at Burton Street, Cheltenham. (Elder brother, William was living and working at the Rectory, Earls Croome as a page boy.

Ernest was a Tailor's apprentice (1901) and (1911) a Shoemaker Boy.  He was reported 'missing' and then 'killed in action' 26 October 1914, France and Flanders.  His service record has not been found, but his medal card shows he received the 1914 Star and Clasp, the British War and Victory medals.
(Brother William above, and Leslie, below)

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Leslie Archibald Thomas EDEN, Private
Service No. 1357, 5th Btn Glos. Regiment

Youngest of four children born to William and (Fannie) Kate Eden, Leslie was born c. 1893 and was a Miller.  When enlisting he lived at Ryecroft Street, Gloucester and was recorded as a boarder, along with his mother, Kate, also a boarder.  He gave his next of kin as his father William who was living at the National Liberal Club, Whitehall, London.  Leslie served from 13 March 1911 to 28 March 1915 (Home), 1 year in France from 29 March 1915 to 12 March 1916.  He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory medals.  No other information has been found.

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(Arthur) Alfred EVANS,
Service No. M2/101392, A.S.C. Motor Transport Company,
Then 262nd, 22nd, 30/36th Divisional Amm Sub

Alfred  was born in Wichenford the son of John W and Brilley H Evans nee Fletcher. He was 26 and a chauffeur, living in Martley Road, Lower Broadheath when he enlisted in the Army Service Corps (Motor Transport) Reserve on 27 May 1915.  Initially Alfred gave his father as his next of kin but following his marriage in March 1918, his next of kin became his wife Florence Gertrude Evans nee Quillin who lived at 6 Shaw Street Worcester with her parents.  Alfred joined 262 Company as part of the BEF on 4 September 1915 and arrived in France at Rouen.  He had 7 days leave in November 1915 and again in the early part of 1917 he was granted 7 days leave which was extended to 10 days. In the same year he was awarded his first Good Conduct Medal.  More leave followed in late February 1918 and on 3 April he was transferred to 30th Div MT Coy (Motor Transport Company).  In June 1918 Alfred was appointed Acting Lance Corporal (unpaid) whilst attached to 30 Div M T Co.  He was demobilised with that rank on 12 June 1919.  Alfred was awarded the 1914/15 Star the British War Medal and the Victory Medals.  You can read about 262 Company and 30 Div MT Coy here:    http://www.1914-1918.net/asc.htm
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Griffith Hooper EVANS, Private/Regt. Quarter Master Sgt.
Service Nos. 186933 & 106864, Anti Aircraft Section. Royal Artillery

William Benbow Evans was born in Chelsea, a grocer by trade and the son of John Evans and his wife Emily. In 1901 the family were living at the New Inn, Sinton Green. William married (Esther) Winifred Humphries in 1910 and they too lived in Sinton Green. On 16 August 1915 William enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery. Only part of his Army record has survived. In 1918 Army Form W 3016, was completed, which was only for the use of men who had returned from an Expeditionary Force or from Garrison abroad. It shows William lived at Rose Villa, Lower Broadheath and that he was a Bombardier, Regimental Number 186933 of R Battery RGA, on another page, RGA Anti-Aircraft Reserve Brigade is mentioned.  William was awarded the Victory and British War Medals.  In 1921 William and Winifred had at least two children Margaret and Antony Benbow Evans. This is all that is known at present.  (For more information, click here.)
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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William Benbow EVANS, Lance Bombardier
Service Nos. 186933 / 106864, Anti-Aircraft Section. Royal Artillery

William Benbow Evans was born in Chelsea, a grocer by trade and the son of John Evans and his wife Emily. In 1901 the family were living at the New Inn, Sinton Green. William married (Esther) Winifred Humphries in 1910 and they too lived in Sinton Green. On 16 August 1915 William enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery. Only part of his Army record has survived. In 1918 Army Form W 3016, was completed, which was only for the use of men who had returned from an Expeditionary Force or from Garrison abroad. It shows William lived at Rose Villa, Lower Broadheath and that he was a Bombardier, Regimental Number 186933 of R Battery RGA, on another page, RGA Anti-Aircraft Reserve Brigade is mentioned.  William was awarded the Victory and British War Medals.  In 1921 William and Winifred had at least two children Margaret and Antony Benbow Evans. This is all that is known at present.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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William George EVERISS, Private/Driver
Service No. 14423, Artillery Column, Royal Field Artillery / 1 Sec, 21st DAC, RFA

William Everiss was born in Tibberton, Worcs and was one of the five surviving children of James and Alice Everiss nee Hughes who lived in Lovington, Lower Broadheath. William was 21 years old when he enlisted on 10 September 1914. He had previously served in the Royal Navy, but had been invalided out because of rheumatic fever. (The writing on the form is faint so it is not known when he was ill), He joined the West Yorkshire Regiment on 10 September but on the 12th September was transferred to the RGA and posted to the Royal Field Artillery as a driver. On one page the Army record says 94th DAC. (Ammunition Column) and on another 12th Battery. On reorganisation William was posted to 21st DAC as a driver. He had been a farm worker before the War and so would have been familiar with working with horses. See http://www.1914-1918.net/rfa_units_94.html.    William spent nearly a year in the UK and was posted to France on 9 September 1915. His posting to 21st DAC took place on 9 December 1916. He gained Proficiency pay in May 1917 and Class 1 Proficiency pay in the August.  He was posted back to base in the UK on 28 December 1918 and transferred to Reserve Class Z on demob on 20 July 1919 and fully discharged in 1920. He acknowledged receipt of the Victory Medal in September 1921.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Albert Edward EVERTON,
Service No. T2SR/02065, Worcs Yeomanry/A.S.C.

Albert Everton was born in 1887 at Broadheath, in the 1911 census he is living with his grandmother Elizabeth Everton aged 77 in Hallow Lane, Broadheath.  He married Annie Hundley from Lower Broadheath in May 1912.  Albert was a groom, who had served in the Yeomanry, when he enlisted on 30 December 1914 and joined the Army Service Corps (Horse transport) and was with the 13th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment.  On 27 May 1915 he was promoted to Lance Corporal.  He spent Christmas 1915 at Fovant in Wiltshire and was absent “off pass” from midnight 25 December until 11.30pm the next day, for which he was reprimanded and lost one day’s pay.  220 Company attached to the 31st Division embarked on HMS Andania from Devonport on 28 December 1915 and 14 days later arrived at Alexandria, Egypt.  On 18 January Albert was reprimanded as absent from early morning stables.  This misdemeanour did not prevent him from being promoted to Corporal in 220 Coy. on 27 May 1916.  (In the November he reverted to Driver at his own request.)  Albert was transferred to 52 (Lowland)  Div 217 Company,  when the 51 Div moved to France and he was then transferred again to 220 Company at El Kantara in February 1917 the 52 Div subsequently being involved with the Suez Canal defences.  On 6 April 1918 it took 16 days for HMT Leasowe Castle to transport Albert and his fellow servicemen from Alexandria to Marseilles.  Leasowe Castle would be torpedoed by UB 51 and sunk in May of that year.  http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=130199.  Albert’s Army record shows that whilst with 4 Coy 52 Div. Train, he was granted 14 days leave in September 1918.  William was admitted to hospital at the end of December suffering from gingivitis (inflammation of the gums which can lead to loss of teeth).  The poor state of Hallow and Broadheath’s servicemen teeth, on enlistment is noted and some of them required immediate attention.  Albert returned to duty in March and was transferred to the UK for release on 5 May 1919. His Protection Certificate and Certificate of Identity shows his address for pay as 5 Maund Street, Comer Gardens, Worcester, which was in the civil parish of Hallow. Albert was awarded the British War Medal and Victory medal.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Albert FARMER, 8th Worcs Regiment/RFA

Albert is mentioned in the Parish Magazine for August 1915, and his name is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. No other information has been found.

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Charles FARMER, Royal Field Artillery

Charles’ name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall – no other information has been found.

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William Bourne FARMER, Private
Died of pneumonia 6th August 1918
Service Nos. TF/3544 & 21145 / 346736 / 3576  and  R/405579,
8th Worcs Regt./ 7th Res. Worcs. Regt./Labour Corp 526H Home Service Emp. Co./ASC

The Army file on William Bourne Farmer 1885 – 6 August 1918 also contains part of the Army file medical record for Corporal Walter Farmer who died on 29 July 1918, also initially of the Worcestershire Regiment, Service number 3576 (allocated to both men)  and later 241143. The two men attested at Worcester within two days of each other and because they were both W Farmer, serving in the same regiment the military clerks appear to have muddled up the various service numbers and to have written up references to service on William’s file that must have related to Walter.  William Bourne Farmer was born in 1885 in Wolferlow, near the Herefordshire order with Worcestershire. He was the son of James and Ellen Farmer. James married Florence Drinkwater on 25 December 1907. Later in his Army file the Labour Corps records name their children as Edith, Lily, William and Eric and that they lived at The Knoll, Lower Broadheath.  (Click here for more information).
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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James Arthur FORTEY, Private / Sergeant
Service No. 325345, 1/1 Worcs Yeomanry, Corps of Hussars

James Arthur Forty was born in Putley, Herefordshire in 1886 (GRO ref) one of the sons of John and Milborough Forty who in 1901 were living in Crown Lane, Martley Road. In 1911 Arthur was still single and working as a Groom and living at The Kennels, Catsfield Sussex.  His Army record may not have survived because he was no longer living in the favoured area around Lower Broadheath, from where a high proportion of servicemen’s records have survived. The Parish News first mentions Arthur in Intercessory Prayers in August 1915, another entry in June 1917 gives the news that Arthur was in a Convalescent camp at Cairo. From the National Archive – a document which includes his name and his regimental number and states that he was “Taken on strength of Battalion XX/XIX” 24 November 1918 as a released Prisoner of War.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother William shown below)

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William FORTEY, (signed as ' Forty'), Private
Service No. 154460, R.A.M.C.

William Forty was born in Putley, Herefordshire in 1875 and married Jane Elizabeth Rogers who was a widow on 2 November 1901 at Worcester Registry Office. In 1911 the family (William, Jane and her son William Rogers) were living in Partridge Lane, Broadheath.  William was a 43 year old Postman when he enlisted on 24 June 1918 and the following day he was posted to the RAMC 5th Training Battalion. He was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine for July/August 1918 and in August 1918 he was posted to RAMC Depot, Blackpool, which was a convalescent hospital. On the 11 January 1918 was posted to the RAMC Blackpool Dispersal Centre, which was where soldiers returning to England were sent before demobilisation. They could also receive any medical attention. He was sent to Chiseldon for his own “dispersal” and was transferred to Class Z Army Reserves for demobilisation on 8 February 1919.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother James shown above)

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Arthur FREEMAN,
Royal Warwickshire

Arthur Freeman was a twin, born at Broadheath in 1899, the second son of Ernest and Ada Freeman nee Ryland (8 surviving children at time of 1911 census).  His service record does not appear to have survived, so the information we have is from the Parish Magazine and the Broadheath Village Hall Roll of Honour.

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Ernest William FREEMAN, Private
Service No. 13622, 1st Worcs Regiment / 24th Trench Mortar Bde. / 24th Inf Bde HQ

Ernest William Freeman was born in 1895 one of the seven surviving sons of Ernest and Ada Freeman of Lower Broadheath. First mentioned in the Parish Magazine in August 1915, unfortunately Ernest’s Army Service record cannot be found but his medal card shows that he received the three war medals – the 1915 Star, British War & the Victory medals. The Absent Voters list for 1918 confirms that his address was Lower Broadheath.

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W J (William John) FREEMAN
Service No. 179247, Army Reserves/"F" MGC/No. 2 MGC Training Brigade

William John Freeman was born on 27 February 1890 and was living with his grandparents Frederick and Mary Freeman in Martley Road, Broadheath at the time of the 1911 census. William was a Close Annealer by trade and was living at 30 Jenkins Street, Newport in South Wales when he voluntarily attested at Brecon on 9th December 1915 and was placed in the Army Reserves. Fortunately William’s Army medical record gave his place of birth as Broadheath, Worcestershire or it would not have been possible to trace the W J Freeman on the Broadheath Roll of Honour.
Although William appears on the 1918 Absent Voters List for our area, on 4 November 1918 William married Mary Elizabeth Humphrey at St Paul’s, Newport. William was mobilised and posted to the “F” Machine Gun Corps Training Battalion on 9 November 1918 two days before the Armistice Treaty was signed. (Elsewhere in William’s Army Service record his posting was described as No. 2 MGC Training Brigade). He was granted “Xmas leave” from 31 December 1918 to 11 January 1919. On 1 March 1919 William was posted to MGC “”D Battalion and 2 months later No.1 Reserve Battalion MGC and was off strength on 12 September. It is only through his Regimental Conduct sheet that it is known that in April 1919 he was at Belton Park, Grantham when he overstayed his leave by 2 days and forfeited 4 days pay.  William was transferred on demobilisation to Class Z Reserve on 12 December 1919. His home address was by then 35 Portskewett Street, Newport, South Wales.
For information about Belton Park, Grantham, the home of the MGC in World War I go to:-
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Charles Fincher GIBBS, Private
Service No. 9120, 9th Worcs Regiment

Charles was born in 1896 the son of Frank and Mary Gibbs who lived in Mill Street, Worcester. He enlisted as a 17 year old on 6 June 1914 into the 9th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Charles occupation at the time was “Tube Dresser” and he was working at the Birmingham Battery & Metal Company & Co in Birmingham, who were Metal Manufacturers. There is some damage to his service record so it’s not known where he was posted. December 1915 saw the start of a period when Charles would be absent from Parade or go AWOL for several days at a time. The penalties increased from forfeiting 7 days pay to 22 days pay and thereafter he resumed his service without interruption, possibly because he was posted on a regular basis from one Battalion to another. The sides of that particular page of his service have been severely damaged. Elsewhere the date that he was with the BEF are given as 12 January 1915 to 18 April 1917. He was in action at Vermalles on 26 September 1915 when he received a gunshot wound to his right leg. He sustained another injury, this time to his right thigh just over a year later in October 1916 and was injured again  on 12 April 1917, a gunshot wound to the left foot.  Elsewhere in his file it mentions that Charles had served in Salonika. Charles married Florence Mary Hill on 6 May 1917 at the Worcester Register Office. Her family lived at Lower Broadheath. On June 20 1919 Charles was transferred to Special Reserve 20 June 1919 as he had a  “Specialist Military Qualification – “3 Rd Cl Co Ed 10/14 “  ??  He was discharged after a second period of engagement on 15 June 1920. Charles was awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals

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Reuben James GILES, Private
Died 1st September 1918
Service Nos. 37930 (MCI) & SN 27920 (AVL), 1st Somerset Lt Infantry

Reuben, of Broadheath, died aged 23 years on 1st Sept 1918, son of James and Clara Giles, 41 Southfield Street, Worcester. He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension, France, Grave IV.D.16.  Reuben was posthumously awarded the Victory and British War Medals.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Richard James GURNEY, Private
Service No. 241104/414405/3520,  Worcs Regt / 949th 3520 AE Co., Lab Corps, Worcs Regt.

Richard James Gurney was born in either Broadheath or Cotheridge, Worcs in 1897, one of the sons of James and Alice Gurney. The place of birth depends on which census is looked at. In 1901 when the family were living near Cradley, Bromyard and Richard’s his place of birth was given as Broadheath. In 1911 the family lived in Beauchamp Lane, Callow End near Worcester and the census record reveals that of James and Alice’s children only Richard (aged 13 born in Cotheridge) and Reginald (aged 1) were still alive.  It has not been possible to locate Richard’s Army record, but the 1918 Electoral Roll shows Richard’s home address was in Bell Lane, Lower Broadheath.

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Albert Edward GWILLAM, also Gwillum – Private
Killed in action 5th August 1916
"A" Co. 2nd/8th Worcs Regt., Signal Section BEF
                                                                   
Albert was killed in action aged 29 years, on 5th August 1916. He was the son of Mr W and Mrs E Gwillam of Kings Green, Wichenford, Worcester (see his brother Leonard, below, for more accurate information about his family and where they lived)  Albert  is buried in Laventie Military Cemetery, La Gorgue, France, Grave III.C.35.  He is remembered on the Broadheath War Memorial and on the Roll of Honour in the Village Hall.  Albert was posthumously awarded British War & Victory Medals.   The Parish Magazine for 1916 states “ we have to record the death of Albert Gwillum (sic) who was well known in the parish and our sympathy goes out to his family in their sorrow.  He had not been very long at the front and was doing very well, when he was killed by a shell which burst over the dugout in which he was asleep. His two brothers are at the front and will be sadly grieved to hear of his death. But we are proud of him. He and many like him have given their lives for home and country and it is this splendid spirit in which our men have gone which will make us honour their names, and their memory. Surely if they have died for England, the finest death any man can have, it is our part to see that England – our parish at all events – shall be worth such a sacrifice. Sometimes we are tempted to doubt whether that people at home realize what is expected of them. We look at the past few years with their selfishness and ungodliness, with sin rampant among us unrebuked, and it seems that we never could get back to the days when men feared God and loved His Church. But when men die for us it gives us new courage. They must not give their lives in vain, and England and Broadheath must, by God’s help, be worthy of such men. We can live for others, trying every day to do something for God, something either word or deed, which will make the place in which we live better, purer and holier”.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Harold and Leonard are shown below)

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Harold Arthur GWILLAM, also Gwillum 
(Gwillam, also Gwillum (Parish magazine) and Gwilliam (on Worcs Regt & IWM websites)
Private, Service Nos. 4464 & 241475, 8 Platoon, B Co., 2nd/8th Worcs Regt. B.E.F.

Harold Arthur Gwillam was born in 1896 the son of William and Emily Gwillam who in 1901 were living at Severn Cottage, Hylton Road, Worcester.  On the 1911 census for Green Lane, Lower Broadheath, Harold’s birthplace is described as Ferry Bank, Henwick. He first appears in the July/August 1918 edition of the Parish Magazine when he is described as a POW. Harold was awarded the British War & Victory medals. His name is on The Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Albert above, and brother Leonard below)

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Leonard Ernest GWILLAM, also Gwillum (Gwillam, also Gwillum
Service No. 3452 - Corporal , 8th Worcs. Regt.  
2nd Lieutenant / Temp. Lieut. ( OAS Worcs Rgt attached RAF)

Leonard Ernest Gwillam was born on 5 December 1897 the son of William (died 1905) and Emily Gwillam. At the time of the 1911 census Emily was living with her children in Green Lane, Lower Broadheath, she re-married in 1915 to John Box. Although Leonard’s Army service record has not survived, his RAF record for 1918-1919 has, and he gave his permanent home address as that of his mother Mrs J Box, 17 Powells Row, St John’s. Worcester.
Leonard is first mentioned for Intercessory prayers in the Parish Magazine in August 1915 when he was serving with the Worcestershire Regiment.  Having served as a corporal in the 5 Battalion Worcestershire Regiment Leonard was attached to the newly formed RAF in July 1918 transferring from the 3 S of A (3rd School of Armoury or Artillery?) on 17 July to the Armoury School. On 8 August he was posted with the Training Brigade Middle East to 20 TDS (Training Depot Station) believed to have been at Aboukir in Egypt, where not only were pilots trained but there was a Gunnery School. The London Gazette shows his promotion to 2nd Lieutenant on 30 November 1918. Leonard was posted in December 1918 via 19 TDS to 17 TDS at El Ferdan and then back to Training Squadron 22 at Aboukir on 8 March 1919 . Near the end of April of that year Leonard seems to have been sent to the Port of Embarkation and rejoined the 5 Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Unfortunately his Army Service record has not survived and so the only other information we have is from the British Army WWI Medal Rolls index which shows that Leonard was awarded all three WWI medals – the 1915 Star, the British War & Victory Medals.
His name is on The Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Albert and Arthur above)

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Leonard John HADLEY, Private
Service No. 25029, Royal Warks Regt

Leonard John Hadley married Ruth E Bradley from Broadheath.  In 1911 she was living in Partridge Lane with her mother (her father appears elsewhere on a separate page of the 1911 census on his own in Lower Broadheath).  Leonard used the Partridge Lane address as his home one on the Electoral Roll for 1918.  Unfortunately his Army Service record cannot be found and the only information we have is from his medal card which indicates that Leonard was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.

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Albert HALL,
4th Worcs Regiment

Noted in the Parish Magazine of August 1915    -     we are  unable to determine if these two men were brothers the sons of Edmund and Fanny Hall who in 1901 lived at Eastham. If anyone knows who they were, we should be very pleased to hear from you.

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Henry HALL
2nd Worcs Regiment

The Parish Magazine of August 1915 records that Henry was wounded -   we are unable to determine if these two men were brothers the sons of Edmund and Fanny Hall who in 1901 lived at Eastham. If anyone knows who they were, we should be very pleased to hear from you.

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Arthur HARDING, Worcs Regiment

Arthur’s name is noted in the Parish Magazine of July/August 1918 – no other information has been found.
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William HARDING, Corporal
Service No. T.S.9341, 852 Co. Army Service Corps.

William is on The Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  He lived at Rosedale, Broadheath. (He may possibly have been the grandson of the Hardings at Archbells)
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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Edward HARDING-NEWMAN, Colonel

The Parish Magazine of July 1917 reported that Edward was lying very ill in a hospital in France.  No other information has been found.

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Arthur Thomas HARDWICK, Private
Service Nos. 8912 / 3366, Worcs Rgt / Glos Rgt

Arthur is recorded in the Absent Voters Lists 1918 and 1919.  The Worcs Archive states that he was frostbitten and twice wounded, both in the leg, and right hand. No other information has been found.

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Clarence Leonard HARRIS, Private or Lance Corporal
Service No. 6487 (MCI – Private) Connaught Rangers

Clarence is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall, and also on the Absent Voters List of 1918.  He lived at the Dewdrop Inn, Broadheath.

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Thomas HARRIS, Medical Corps.

Other than his name being recorded in the Parish Magazine of September 1914, no other information has been found.

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Albert HAYWARD, Private
Killed in action 3rd December 1917
Service No. 240579,  2nd/8th Worcs Regiment

Albert's name is first recorded in the Parish Magazine of August 1915.  He was killed in action 3rd December 1917 (with the Expeditionary Force, France).  He was a resident of Broadheath, and he enlisted in Worcester.  He is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France, Panel 6.  (Albert has no known grave.) His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Frank HAYWARD, Corporal
Service Nos. 75478 and 245143, Derbyshire Yeomanry / Derbyshire Cyclists / Royal Warks Rgt.

Frank Hayward aged 16, a draper’s messenger and his brother Arthur aged 20 appear on the 1901 census at 81 Hylton Road, Worcester where they were visitors in the home of Charles J Clarke and his wife Jane nee Hayward. Frank, Arthur and Jane were all born in Broadheath. It has not been possible to find Frank or Arthur’s Amy Service record but Frank’s medal card shows he was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Fred(erick) HILL, Private
Service No. 56690, 4th Hants Regt. A Company

Frederick Hill was born in 1900 the son of Frederick and Letitia Hill nee Weaver who lived in Lower Broadheath. At the time f the 1911 census Frederick was the youngest of four children at home. It has not been possible to find his service record. His name is on the Broadheath Roll of Honour.
Brother William is recorded below.
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William Thomas HILL, Gunner
Service No. 189174, No. A Sub No. 3 Section 48 Division D of C. R.F.A.,
Italian Expeditionary Force.

William was born in 1897 the son of Frederick and Letitia Hill nee Weaver who lived in Lower Broadheath. At the time of the 1911 census William was a fourteen year old Farm labourer.  It has not been possible to find his service record.  His name appears on the Broadheath Roll of Honour in the village hall. (Wounded) – He is recorded on the Absent Voters list 1919, and the Parish Magazine of July Aug 1918 stated William was in 48th Div., Small Arms Ammunition, R.F.A., Lancs.  His brother Fred is noted above.

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William HOBDAY, Private
Service No. 44022 and  Army Ordnance Corps -  052596, A Co., No. 2 Platoon,
2nd/4th Royal Berks. Regt. B.E.F. France

William is on The Broadheath Roll of Honour. There are three Service numbers for William: Hants Rgt 46142, Royal Berks 44022 and AOC 052596.
(He may have been related to Henry Hobday of Upper Broadheath 1915?)
No service record has been found but  William’s medal card shows that he was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.

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James HUGHES, Private
Killed in action 24th April 1917
Service No. 241046, 1st/8th Worcs Regt.

James was first noted in the Parish Magazine of August 1915.   He was killed in action aged 43 years on 24th April 1917.   James was born at Grimley, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Hughes, and husband of Alice Jane Hughes nee Phillips, of the Knoll, Lwr Broadheath. He is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, France, Pier and Face 5A and 6C. -  Information from Worcs. Archives - Pte Hughes missing 24.4.17. James has no known grave. Knoll, three of his sons Ernest, Walter and William served in WWI. (Walter also died.)  James’ name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Ernest William HUGHES, Private
Service Nos. 4925 & 241700,  7th Worcs Regt / Royal Field Artillery

Ernest William was born in 1897 in Grimley, he was one of the sons of James and Alice Jane Hughes of Broadheath Common. On the 1911 census Ernest was a farm labourer living at Broadheath Common with his parents and five siblings.  His military record has not been found.  He is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine in 1915 and again in June 1917, when he was reported to be in hospital in England.  His father, James and two brothers, Walter and William served in WWI.  His father and brother Walter died.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Walter James HUGHES, Private
Killed in action 24th April 1917
Service No. 241654, 1st/8th Worcs Regiment

Walter was killed in action aged 22 years on 24th April 1917.  He was the son of James and Alice Jane Hughes, of the Knoll, Broadheath, and is buried in Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery, France, Grave I.A.26.  His father James, and two of his brothers Ernest William, and William  Henry served in WWI. His father also died.  Walter’s name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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William Henry HUGHES, Private
Service No. 118164, 7th Worcs Regt / Royal Field Artillery

Ernest William was born in 1897 in Grimley, he was one of the sons of James and Alice Jane Hughes of Broadheath Common. On the 1911 census Ernest was a farm labourer living at Broadheath Common with his parents and five siblings.  His military record has not been found.  He is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine in 1915 and again in June 1917, when he was reported to be in hospital in England.  His father, James and two brothers, Walter and William served in WWI.  His father and brother Walter died.  

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Frederick Arthur JAYNES

Frederick Arthur Jaynes was born in Wichenford in about 1900. He was one of William and Agnes Jaynes' sons. In 1901 they were living at Abintons in Wichenford. His service record has not survived and no further information is available at the moment.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. His brothers George and William are shown below.



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George James JAYNES, Driver
Service No. T3/029915, Army Service Corps HT 825 Co.

George Jaynes was born in Wichenford in 1895. He was one of William and Agnes Jaynes' sons. In 1901 they were living at Abintons in Wichenford. His service record has not survived and no further information is available at the moment.  The Absent Voters list of 1918 gave his address as Grange Cottage, Lower Broadheath. His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. His brothers Frederick, above, and William (below) are also shown.

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William Charles JAYNES, Private
Service Nos. 70603 / 5278 / 492530, Worcs Regt / Warks Regt /424th Agric. Co.

William Charles Jaynes was born in Wichenford in 1896. He was one of William and Agnes Jaynes' sons. In 1901 they were living at Abintons in Wichenford.  His service record has not survived and no further information is available at the moment.   His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. His brothers Frederick and George are shown above.
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Alfred JONES, Worcs Regiment

Alfred’s name is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall, and he was mentioned in the Parish Magazine of July/August 1918 – no other information has been found as yet.

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Alfred Charles JONES, Private
Service No. possibly 22947, 6th Worcs. Regiment

Possibly one of the elder brothers of Thomas Allen Jones, if so his  parents were William (farm labourer) and mother Amelia who lived at Southwood Cottage, Shelsley Beauchamp with his 3 brothers and 5 sisters (Census 1911).  We don’t yet know why this family are mentioned in the Parish Magazine of July 1915.

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George William JONES, Private
Service No. 4519, 8th Worcs Regiment

George was born on July 3 1895 at Shelsley Beauchamp and was a 5ft 2ins tall farm labourer when he attested and was embodied into the Territorial Forces 8th Worcestershire Regiment on 22 November 1915.  He signed his name a G William Jones and gave his address as Gatterley Sq. Hallow (Gatley, Shoulton, Hallow?). William served for 54 days until 14 January 1916. William was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of January1916 . On discharge his home address was Fish Street, Worcester. The grounds for his discharge were Kings Regulations para 392. iii, c.KCR . The Medical Board which made the decision indicated that National Federation of Discharged Soldiers and Sailors applied on behalf of this man. Written in pencil is:-  “30% under 3”. He was granted £7 10s of the War Gratuity and his character was given as “Very Good”.
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John Henry JONES,
8th Worcs. Regiment

Possibly one of the elder brothers of Thomas Allen Jones if so his parents were William (farm labourer) and mother Amelia who lived at Southwood Cottage, Shelsley Beauchamp with his 3 brothers and 5 sisters (Census 1911).  We don’t yet know why this family are mentioned in the Parish Magazine of June 1915.


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Thomas Allen JONES, Private
Killed in action 17th December 1917
Service Nos. 4151 & 302412, 8th Territorial Worcs Regiment and
2/7th Bttn (Highlanders) The Royal Scots, C Coy


Thomas was born 1898 to parents William (farm labourer) and mother Amelia who lived at Southwood Cottage, Shelsley Beauchamp with his 3 brothers and 5 sisters (Census 1911). At the time of enlisting May 1915, he had 4 brothers and 6 sisters, and lived at 11 Fish Street, Worcester. His trade was an Ostler. He stated his age to be 19, when in fact he was only 16 yrs old, and a note on his service record of 3 Nov 1916, states that he was underage when he enlisted. He joined the 3 Line Depot, 8th Worcs Regt, transferring to the 2/7th Bttn (Highlanders), The Royal Scots) C. Coy in Oct 1917. He was sent abroad with the British Expeditionary Forces, and was killed in action ('died in the field, France') 17 December 1917, aged 19 yrs.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Herbert George Samuel (aka Bertie) JONES, Driver
Service Nos.  1420 / 740761, 72 Battery, Royal Field Artillery

Herbert (Bertie) was the younger brother of Reginald, born in Broadheath c. 1894. His father, Thomas was a groom (Census 1911) and mother was Annie Chapman Jones. He also had a sister, Florence. He was sent to France November 1915 and in the Parish Magazine of June 1917 it is stated that "he is in hospital in England, now making good progress". His name also appears on the Absent Voters List of 1919. His record card shows that he was awarded the British War and Victory medals and the 1915 Star. No other service record or information can be found.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  His brother Reginald is noted below.

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Reginald Thomas JONES, Private
Service Nos. 2725, M/418012 & A/MO M/25888, 5th/11th Worcs Rgt / RAMC

Reginald was born in Broadheath c. 1893. His father, Thomas was a groom/labourer, and his mother was Annie Chapman. He had a brother and sister. The family lived in Partridge Lane, Lower Broadheath. Reginald's name first appears in the Parish Magazine of June 1916 so he may have enlisted about this time. He is also recorded in the magazine for July/Aug 1918. He received the British War and Victory medals. No other information has been found.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  His brother Herbert is noted above.

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Vincent George JONES, Gunner
Service Nos. 111591 / 222209 / WR/209203, Machine Gun Corps, Royal Field Artillery /
Royal Engineers / 11th Battalion, Tank Corps

Vincent George Jones aged 13 was living with his recently widowed mother Mrs Louisa Caroline Oakley at 2 Strand Cottages, Lower Broadheath at the time of the 1911 census. Vincent first appears in Parish Magazine in the November/December 1918 issue. He can also be found n the Absent Voters list for 1918. Unfortunately his Army Service record does not seem to have survived. The only other information we have is from his medal card which shows that Vincent was awarded the British War & Victory Medals. Vincent died in the Birkenhead are in 1957.

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(Alfred) Archibald KING,
Service No. M2/272194, Ammunition Column 2/2 South Midland Brigade (RFA)


Alfred Archibald Frederick Charles King was born in 1893 in Cotheridge, his parents Albert and Clara King. His younger brother was Harry a Military Foot Policeman during the War.  Archibald’s military record when he was in the RFA 2/2 South Midlands Brigade has not survived. However, there is useful information about his previous service in the RAMC medical report. Archibald was a motor fitter when he re-enlisted in the RAMC on 12 October 1916 and in March 1917 a Medical Report statement was made on Archibald’s disability. (foot) He had previously been in the Royal Field Artillery and in April 1915, whilst on duty, had an accident which had invalided him out of the Army as “medically unfit”. He was called up again in October 1916 and was admitted to hospital the next day. His foot was x-rayed and the hospital said that nothing could be done, even though he suffered great pain almost continually. The report states that Archibald’s foot was very deformed and that “he appears quite unfit for military service”.  The Medical Board noted that he was discharged before as unfit and that they were of the opinion that he was apparently in the same condition. They believed that the condition was liable to get worse under military conditions and they recommended that he should be discharged as unfit.  Archibald was duly discharged as “no longer physically fit for War Service” on 9 April 1917 and gave his address as The Lodge, Cotheridge. He was classed as having served in the UK from 2 March 1916 to 9 April 1917 and received part of the £30 War Gratuity. He later married Gwendoline V Harris in 1917 and died in 1950.  His brother Harry is below.

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Harry KING, Corporal
Service No. P4095, Military Foot Police

Harry King was the elder brother of Archibald who also served in WWI. His parents were Albert and Clara King of the Lodge Cotherdige. Harry is on the Electoral Roll 1918 for The Firs, Lower Broadheath. His military record cannot be found under P0495 although there is an H King SN 1225 Temp Sergeant.  Brother Alfred Archibald is above.

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Reginald LEES, Private
Service No. 241471, 2/8th Worcs Rgt

Henry  was born c. 1896 in Powick, Worcs.  He was the  son of  Henry and Annie Lees who at the time of the 1911 census were living at Middle Temple Laugherne. Living with them was Reginald’s grandfather John Lees who was a retired coachman and an Army Pensioner.  Reginald was twice wounded 11.7.16 at Laventil, 29.5.17 Bapume and Cambrai Road.  He was a  Prisoner of War for 9 months at Cassel and Mannheim. He lived at Temple Laugherne, Broadheath.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. 

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William LEWIS, Private
Killed in action 6th August 1915
Service No. 21203, 4th Bttn Worcestershire Regiment

William Lewis was born in Lower Broadheath in about 1877.  He married Florence Jane Hobday in 1907, they had three children and lived in Green Lane, Lower Broadheath.  His Army Service record has not survived, so the only information we have is that he enlisted at Droitwich and was killed in action on 6 August 1915, at the action of Krithia Vineyard, Gallipoli. (Described on pages 93 and 94 of  Captain H FitzM Stacke's  "The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War").
William is remembered on the Helles Memorial in Turkey and in this country on the Droitwich Memorial.  (His name is not on the memorial at  Broadheath church).   At the moment it is not clear which W Lewis is remembered on the Roll of Honour at Broadheath Village Hall. 

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W LEWIS

This soldier is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. He could be Wilfred A Lewis, as he has the SN of a missing W Farmer on the ‘Remember The Fallen’ website.

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Sylvanus Fox LLOYD, Reverend, M.A. (Chaplain)
Temporary Chaplain to the Forces.(1st Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regt.)

Rev Lloyd 1881-1954 was a graduate of Oxford University and was living in Edgbaston, Birmingham at the time of the 1911 census, later that year he married Marjorie H Crease. From 1914-1921 he was Vicar of Broadheath and temporary chaplain to the Forces 1918-1920. Roll of Honour. AVL 1919 - Chaplain 1st KOR.  He was vicar at Malvern Wells 1927-1937 when he was instituted as rector of Upton on Severn. More information can be found in Crockfords Directory.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. 

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Richard Spencer LUCY, 2nd Lieutenant / Major
Royal Flying Corps./RAF

Richard was born 24 October 1893 to Arthur (a mechanical engineer) and Nora.  The Census of 1901 shows the family lived in Croydon, and the 1911 Census shows Richard living as a boarder in Birmingham, and he was a medchanical apprentice (motor trade).  He married Hermoine Cuming, daughter of Admiral Cuming, in 1923, and he died in 1944.  (For full information, click here).

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Arthur LUGG, Gunner/Driver
Service Nos. 46805 (Gunner) and 145388 (Driver), 99th Brigade R.F.A. Gloucester

Arthur  Lugg was born in Stonehouse, Gloucestershire in 1889 the son of Charles and Caroline Lugg.  Arthur was working as a farm labourer for Mr Fidoe at the Cobhouse, Wichenford before he joined the Army in 1907.  His Discharge papers show that he was single and his address Frenchlands Lane, Lower Broadheath.  He attested as a Gunner in the RHA at Portland on 7 March 1907.  On 15 January 1914 he was transferred to Reserve B and mobilised at Athlone on 7 August 1914.  He mustered as a Driver with the RFA on 27 May 1915 and was posted in August possibly first to Salonika where he served for three years. Arthur contracted Malaria in April 1916 and was treated in the 28th General Hospital.  His discharge papers show that he also served in France for 16 months.  He was transferred 13 May 1919 to Z reserve and listed his civilian occupation as a carter.  Arthur served for 12 years in the Army including South Africa, France and the Mediterranean. He was awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Victory medals. His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Ernest MARDELL, Private / Lance Corporal -
Service Nos. 5358 & 4/7012 (Private) and 223254 (L. Corporal),
4th Btn 2nd Bedfordshire Regt. / Labour Corps

Ernest was born on 7 June 1882 at North Mimms, Hertfordshire, the son of James and Mary Mardell.  He married Mary Ann Insall on 13 November 1909 at Worcester Register Office. The 1911 census shows them with their two daughters Irene and Ruby.  Ernest attested on 7 August 1914 at Hertford and confirmed that he had previously served in the Army and had been discharged 21 November 1905 (SN 5358).  He was deemed fit for the Reserves for the 4th Battalion Bedfordshire Regt.  He was mobilised on 8 August 1914 and posted to France with the 2nd Battalion on the 11th November.  The Battalion’s War Diary can be found here
http://www.bedfordregiment.org.uk/2ndbn/2ndbtn1915diary.html.  Appointed as Acting Lance Corporal unpaid, he was finally appointed and paid as L/Cpl (Lance Corporal) on 13 October 1916. On that day the Battalion were en route from Flers in the Montauban area to Switch Trench -  http://www.bedfordregiment.org.uk/2ndbn/2ndbtn1916diary.html.  Ernest was transferred to the Labour Corps as L/Cpl under ACI 837 in July 1917, seven months after the Labour Corps was formed. Ernest served as a L/Cpl in the 227 Div. Employ Co and was given a new service number 223254. He became an Acting Corporal (paid) on 1 October 1918. He returned to England in January 1919, Ernest was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on demobilisation on 17 October 1919 when he gave his home address as Bell Lane, Lower Broadheath, nr Worcester. In 1921 he had moved to Green Lane, Lower Broadheath and his file notes that he was entitled to one wound stripe.  He received a gun-shot wound to his right thigh Medical category B2 20 January 1919.   Ernest died in our area 1935.

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Ernest George MAYLETT, Private
Service No. 202810, 4th Worcs Rgt

Ernest was born in Broadheath (Cotheridge crossed through) on 30 April 1880, next of kin Margaret Maylett of Spring Cottage, Broadheath. Ernest had worked as a groom at Hawford Lodge and later was employed at The Kennels, Fernhill Heath. He joined the 8th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment from Army Reserve Class B on 24 March 1916. His service numbers included 5038, 6017 and 202816.  In September 1916 he was posted to the Reserve Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment (9th Battalion). On 12 January 1917 Ernest passed a Cold Shoeing Course at the Farriery School in Romsey, for which he received a gratuity of 5s. His Army record shows that he was posted to 4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment at Abbeville in March 1917 and was in France until February 1919 when he returned to England and was demobilised on 15 May 1919. As Ernest had served overseas he was entitled to three blue chevrons and was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal.  Ernest died in 1950. 
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. 

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Frank MAYLETT, Private
Service No. 27346, 5th Btn. Worcs Regt.

His Military History sheet shows that he was in the UK from 10 Feb 1916 to 7 August 1916. Whilst at the Training camp at Tregantle, he was absent from parade for Rifle Inspection and as a result spent 3 days confined to barracks. This penalty was awarded by Captain Stacke who after the war was to write the important book “The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War”. From 8 August 1916 Frank was with the 11th Worcestershire Regiment  as part of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  The Battalion were already in Macedonia and the following link explains the situation – 
http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/wr.php?main=inc/bat_11.  

Frank was demobilised to Class Z on 3 October 1919 .  His character was described as “Very good” and he was awarded 3 blue Chevrons, indicating 3 years service in the field. Frank married Emily Rastall in 1924 and had two children. He died 1967.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  His brother Tom is shown below.

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Tom aka Thomas MAYLETT, Private
Service Nos. 20721 & 497751, Worcs Regt./13th London Regt

(Brother to Frank and Sidney)  Tom Maylett was born in 1894 and was one of the three sons of George and Margaret Maylett who at the time of the 1911 census lived at Cotheridge, where George was a Gentleman’s gardener and young Tom was a stable boy. His Army Service record has not survived so the only information we have is from his medal card which shows he received the British War and Victory medals.
Tom married Mabel Smith and he died in the Malvern Registration district in 1980. He died 1967.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  His brother Frank is shown above.

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Robert Charles MAYLETT, Private
Service No. 307617, Royal Warwickshire

Robert was born in 1886, son of Charles and Clara Maylett late Lewis nee Clark,  who,  in 1901 lived at Lower Broadheath Common. At the time of the 1911 census Robert was a footman to retired Colonel John Hopton at Canon Frome Court, possibly because of earlier Hopton connections with Hallow.  His Army Service record has not survived but his Medal Card shows he received the British War and Victory medals.
He married Elise Lloyd in Herefordshire and died in the Worcester Registration district in 1966.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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George Henry MARSH, Private
Service No. 41142, M.M. Co., 4th Worcs Regt./Labour Corps 5455224

George Henry Marsh was born in 1886 at St. Johns, and was the son of Richard and Mary Marsh. He married Elizabeth Birbeck in 1906  and lived at Temple Laugherne, Lower Broadheath, where he was an agricultural labourer working for Mr D Best.  The 1911 Census stated that he was a tree pruner, and at that time he had two sons and one daughter and the family lived at New Mill Bridge, Shelsley Walsh.

George was posted to the Reserves on 11 December 1915. He was mobilised in late May and went to Rouen and by 17 June he was posted to the 4th Battalion Worcs Regiment in the Field. He was wounded in action of 16 August 1917 and admitted to a field hospital with a gun-shot wound to the right buttock, he was wounded again in an air raid 4 days later. George was transferred to the UK, 4 General Hospital. Three brief postings followed, two were with the 6th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment.
                                                                                                                                               
He was awarded the Military Medal on 18 October 1917 in connection with his service with 4th Battalion. George had requested through his CO that he be presented with, and retain, the Medal in early 1918 whilst he was working in the Infantry Record Office No 7 District, Warwick, but his file shows that the Medal should be forwarded to OC Troops Birmingham.

In early November 1917 his file indicates he was to go before a Medical Board with a view to his re-classification or discharge from the service. On 7 November he transferred to P Class and three days later was granted a ten day furlough from hospital to his home address at Lower Temple Laugherne. He was posted from 4th to the 6th Battalion Worcestershire Regt, Dovercourt on the 17th November 1917, two days before the official end of his furlough. So it seems that although a decision had been made, he was not posted to the Labour Corps until 23 April 1918 when he was with 627 Agricultural Company at the Worcester Depot of the Worcestershire Regiment where George may have helped to tend the Regiment’s vegetable gardens. George was subsequently posted to the 424 Agricultural Company also attached to the Worcestershire Regiment and finally from there to SCLC (Southern Command Labour Corps) at Fovant, Wiltshire from where he was discharged as no longer physically fit for service on 15 July 1919. He was awarded the Silver Badge and a 40% disability pension due to the gunshot wound and neurasthenia (shell shock).  He was given 11s a week for 26 weeks plus 11s 4d for his six children. It is not clear if the allowance for the children was from - or to - 4 August 1919.

His Army record confirmed that George was also awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

George died in 1965.

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Harry MORRIS

Harry was mentioned in the Parish Magazine of July/Aug 1918.  The only information that has been found is that he was a Prisoner of War.

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John Bertie G. MUMBY, Signaller and Sapper
Service Nos. (Signaller)  316644 and (Sapper) 80497, Royal Engineers /6th Reserve Bttn MGC

John Bertie G Mumby married Alice Elizabeth Boaz from Partridge Farm, Lower Broadheath on 25 March 1913 at Broadheath church and this explains why he is remembered for Intercessory Prayers in the Parish Magazine. Bertie’s Army Service record is damaged and some parts have been destroyed by fire. The file shows that he was a fish merchant when he attested in Milford Haven in December 1915. By then Bertie and Alice had two children, a son born in Swansea and a daughter in Milford Haven. Bertie first joined for duty on 16 July 1917 and seems to have been in the 32 Reserve MGC Motors. A very badly damaged page of his file seems to indicate that he was transferred from Signal Depot RE to Special Brigade Depot RE (possibly B Reserve) on 10 November 1917 and transferred again to RE Depot Bedford in December that year.  On the 8 June 1918 he was re-mustered as a Sapper/Motor Cyclist Despatch Rider to the Wellingborough Signal Depot no 1308. On 17 July 1918 Bertie was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps (Motors) SSTC. He seems to have been compulsorily transferred in the August to MGC (Motors) Grantham and granted leave with a free warrant on 26 October 1918. Bertie was demobilised from 6th Reserve Bttn MGC and transferred to Z Reserve on 12 February 1919. Home address was Devon House, Dewsland St Milford Haven.

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(Eddie) Edwin Charles MUNN, Private
Service No. M2/105979, Army Service Corps

Edwin was born 2 February 1894 in Hallow, and was the grandson of Jane Munn of The Knoll, Lower Broadheath.  The 1911 census records that Edwin was an engine cleaner.  The Great Western railway employment records show that he started his employment 7 May 1910, and earned 1s 9d  (about £8 - 2015) rising to 2s 6d (app £13) by 1912.  He was discharged 2 December 1912 as being 'medically unfit'.  His service record has not been found, but his medal record card shows that he enlisted 4 October 1915, and served in France, for which he received the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.  He married in 1926, Beatrice Annie Tarrant, and he died 9 December 1957 at the Avonside Hospital, Evesham. The probate index of wills and administrations stated his home address as 46 Bloomfied Road, Worcester - his estate was left to his widow, Beatrice.  No other information has been found.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Richard MUNN, Gunner
Killed in action 14th October 1916
Service No. 3017, "C" Battery, 241st Brigade Royal Field Artillery, Worcester

Richard is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of August 1915, and was the son of Richard Munn of Lwr Broadheath.  He died aged 22 years on 14th October 1916, and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France, Grave VIII.D.140.  He was awarded the Military Medal. His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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George Isaac PALMER,
Australian Contingent

Full name George Isaac Henry Teesdale Palmer was born in 1885, the son of Thomas and Florence Palmer. On the 1911 census he was living with his grandmother at Lower Broadheath and his occupation was Engineer Toolmaker. His aunt Ellen and her husband had emigrated to Victoria, Australia in the early 1900’s and this may be why he enlisted in the Australian Contingent in Leongatha, Victoria, Australia in April 1916 at the age of nearly 31. He married Margaret Harding in 1917 and she lived at 26 Park Avenue, Barbourne, Worcester.  Between enlistment and his marriage he embarked for France on SS Princess Henrietta and was transferred on 6th December to the 59th Battalion from the 5th Division Back Depot and served as a Private at Etaples until 17 February 1917, when he was appointed Lance Corporal. In March he was promoted to Corporal and on the 20 March he was admitted to hospital at Rouen with a “dislocated right shoulder” incurred whilst “in action in the field”. Two days later he was admitted to the 1st London General Hospital, Camberwell, on 27 March 1917 with a fractured left tibia. His records were changed in January. Whilst in the UK he must have taken the opportunity to marry Margaret Harding. Corporal Isaac Palmer received a “special mention in Sir Douglas Haig’s Despatch of (vide A.I.F. list 156 dated 5/6/17) Court of Enquiry 4174 re B117”.  He was discharged 3rd MD on 24 April 1918 and received a Victory Medal in April 1923 as well as the 1914-15 Star and the British War Medal.  WWII:  His Australian Imperial Forces record also contains letters that he wrote as a Corporal in 1941 from the 9th Garrison Battalion, Portsea, Victoria, concerning replacement of a lost oak leaf badge that he was entitled to wear with his ribbon because he had been mentioned in despatches in WWI. Another letter refers to theft in 1948 of his Return from Active Service lapel badge, whilst he was on the Repatriation Staff at Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Victoria. The hospital today continues to treat War Veterans and Widows.  
http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1047594--1-.PDF
- The eye witnesses reports on the death of Capt. Hughes includes Corporal Palmer’s testimony, the incident having happened when Isaac was injured on 20 March 1917.

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Albert George Harold PARDOE, Private
Service No. 27276, RAVC / G Sub. Div., 23rd Veterinary Hospital, B.E.F.

Albert is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  He lived in Lovington, Broadheath.  The Medal Card Index shows he enlisted 25 April 1917 and demobilised  7 March 1919.  (In 1911 Albert, Ernest and Henry Pardoe were living with their parents and sisters in Fort Royal Lane, Worcester. The Parish Magazine shows the family’s wartime connection with Lovington, Broadheath.  Later their sister Florence Victoria A. Pardoe married former WWI soldier Albert Walter Richardson from Shoulton. (Unfortunately none of the three brothers army service records have survived.) 
Brothers Ernest and Henry are below.

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Ernest A. PARDOE, Corporal.
Service No. 20902, 13th and 9th Worcs Regt, Mediterranean Exp. Force (1915)

Enlisted 26 August 1915 and  served in the Balkans.  The ‘Remember the Fallen’ website records Cpl E Pardoe wounded 7.1.16. Discharged in consequence of wounds 20.4.16.  Lived in Lovington, Broadheath.  Ernest was awarded the 1915 Star, British War & Victory medals.  (In 1911 Albert, Ernest and Henry Pardoe were living with their parents and sisters in Fort Royal Lane, Worcester. The Parish Magazine shows the family’s wartime connection with Lovington, Broadheath. Later their sister Florence Victoria A Pardoe married former WWI soldier Albert Walter Richardson from Shoulton.  (Unfortunately none of the three brothers army service records have survived.)  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
Brothers Albert (above) and Henry (below) are also shown.

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Henry (Harry) Robert PARDOE, Lance Corporal
Service No. 28892, 52nd Hampshire Regt., Reed Hall Camp, Colchester.
Home Service and 201st Inf. Brigade

Henry is mentioned in the Parish Magazine of June 1917.  The Parish Magazine shows the family’s wartime connection with Lovington, Broadheath.  (In 1911 Albert, Ernest and Henry Pardoe were living with their parents and sisters in Fort Royal Lane, Worcester.)  The Absent Voters List 1919 showed that he lived in Lovington, Broadheath and stated "Now gone to France".  Later their sister Florence Victoria A Pardoe married former WWI soldier Albert Walter Richardson from Shoulton.
Unfortunately none of the three brothers army service records have survived.)
Henry’s name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Edward PARTRIDGE, Gunner
Service Nos. 3043 & 831038, 1/2nd South Midland Brigade -  Royal Field Artillery

Edward was born in 1890 one of the sons of Henry and Rose Partridge from Dines Green, Worcester. He was a labourer when he attested into the Territorial Forces 2nd South Midland (Reserve) Brigade RFA on 26 January 1915 and was posted to 241 Brigade, Base Depot 7 July 1915 and  then to France with 1/2 South Midland Brigade at the end of August. (the names 241 Bde and South Midland Bde are interchangeable - see http://www.denniscorbett.com/241.html ).
Edward received a shrapnel wound to the head and was admitted to hospital on 2 July 1916 and was transferred to England 2 days later to the Lord Derby War Hospital near Warrington. This was a large hospital which treated servicemen in both World Wars,when not carrying out its normal function as Winwick Hall  Asylum. Edward remained there until 5 October 1916 (91 days), during this time he may also have had influenza. On 30 March 1917 he was posted to Base Depot in France and in mid April to 58th DAC (Divisional Ammunition Column). Edward was subsequently posted to the Royal Engineers -  A/291 Brigade and seems to have undertaken courses with  two of the Field Companies attached to the 58th Div  - 504 (2/2 Wessex) and  511 (1/5 London). He was later briefly with the Pioneer Section RE, which undertook labouring work near the front line and then rejoined A/291 Brigade. Later pages of his Army Service record appear to be smoke damaged, and difficult to read but some time in the summer of 1918 he was admitted to a Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) with a wound to his back. Further injuries were incurred, a shell wound to his back kept him in hospital for 56 days from 1 September 1918 and he was in hospital again from 27 November 1918 until Christmas with a gunshot wound to the back, which is puzzling as the Armistice took place on 11 November 1918.  Edward was disembodied following demobilisation on 22 January 1919 and gave his home address as Dynes Green, Lower Broadheath, Worcester. On 18 November 1919 Edward and his two brothers Richard and William wrote a joint letter asking which medals they were entitled to.  Edward  stated he was in France from June 1915-Sept 1918 and he was awarded all three medals – the 1914/15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.  It is hoped to find out more about where Edward  and his brothers served in France.
Brothers Richard and William are below.

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Richard PARTRIDGE, Driver
Service Nos. 2924 & 830945, 2nd South Midland Brigade / Royal Field Artillery

Richard Partridge was born in 1896 one of the sons of Henry and Rose Partridge from Dines Green, Worcester. At the time of the 1911 census he was working as a servant to Osbourne Boulton, the miller at Tunridge Mill, Suckley.  Richard attested into the Territorial Forces 2nd South Midland Brigade on the 8 November 1914 at Worcester and was posted to the 241st Brigade. On 30 March 1915 he was in France where he remained until late 1917.  In 1916 Richard was granted Class 2 Proficiency Pay (4d per day). He was admitted on 3 occasions to hospital for relatively minor problems associated with soldiers in the Field. Richard seems to have had his first leave of absence (10 days) in January 1917 although it seems he “rejoined from leave” on 9 February!  In November 1917 he “proceeded to Italy” and in January 1918 Richard was admitted to hospital with dermatitis and after 18 days treatment was discharged to duty with 241st Brigade. (Elsewhere B Battery 241 Bde is mentioned) The first two weeks of August were spent on leave and on 27 February 1919 Richard's record shows that he was sent back to the UK dispersal centre and demobilised from Charlton to “Dynes Green Lower Broadheath”.
    http://www.1914-1918.net/demobilisation.htm
On 18 November 1919 Richard and his two brothers William and Edward wrote a joint letter asking which medals they were entitled to. Richard indicated that he had served in France and Italy from March 1915 to February 1919. He was advised he was entitled to all three the 1915 Star, British War & Victory medals).  There is an entry in his army service record showing that these were awarded.  Brother Edward (above) and William (below) are also shown.

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William PARTRIDGE, Driver
Service Nos. 188 & 845150, Royal Field Artillery

William Partridge was one of the sons of Henry and Rose Partridge from Dines Green, Worcester. Unlike his two brothers his Army Service record does not appear to have survived the WWII bombing. All we know at the moment is that on 18 November 1919 William and his two brothers Edward and Richard wrote a joint letter asking which medals they were entitled to. William had served overseas 27 March 1915 – 5 November 1916  and was awarded the 1915 Star, British War & Victory medals.  His brothers Edward and Richard are above.

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James PASSEY, Driver and Private
Service Nos. 3019 &  204234, 2nd South Midland (Reserve) Brigade, Royal Field Artillery & 
7th Reserve/ 9th Bttn Worcestershire Regiment

James Passey’s  was born in Lowesmoor, Worcester and his birth was registered in 1893 as James Passy Colley, but he was known as James Passey.  James was 9 years old and living with his grandmother Emma Passey at one of the Knoll cottages, Lower Broadheath in 1901 and at the time of the 1911 census he was living at 16 Mill Street, Quaker’s Yard, Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire, with his father James Passey, a butcher from Grimley.  His mother wasn’t with them, but his now invalid grandmother and his younger brother Albert were at home.  James was an assistant butcher.
James attested on 16 January 1915 at Worcester and gave his home address as Lower Broadheath.  He joined the 2nd South Midland Brigade (Reserve) RFA as a Driver (of horses) and served at home for 329 days and was discharged under King’s Regulation 392, due to flat feet which were found at a Medical board in August 1915. The Medical Board noted that he was a butcher and that he had had flat feet for many years. James was used to carrying heavy weights before his enlistment and there was no mention of his condition in Medical History sheets as he had never been admitted to a Military Hospital for the complaint. His “present condition” was that “he cannot march”.  Interestingly this was insufficient information, and the following was added “the soles of both feet are completely on the ground, vide enclosed footprints, the man has not walked more than a mile or two without ‘falling out’ “. The Medical Board also noted that Military Service had made James’ condition worse.
On 25 July 1917 James enlisted at Worcester into the 7th Bttn Worcestershire Regiment He indicated that he had been discharged from the RFA and requested to join the ASC as a butcher, He gave his Welsh address this time (49 Taff Street, Pontypridd, Glamorgan.) James’ Military History Sheet shows he attested on 2 March 1916 and joined as already mentioned on 25 July 1917. He was in the UK until 7 October 1917 and spent the following 2 years 58 days with the Indian Expeditionary Force. Returning to the UK on 5 December 1919 and 27 days later transferred to Class Z Army Reserves his home address was then that of his father in Treharris. His flat feet caused him to be classed as Biii. The standard “Statement as to Disability” which was undertaken as a Medical Board took place at Poona (Pune, Maharashtra State, India),the rest of the form is blank. Elsewhere in James’ Army Service record a problem with his wrist states “incomplete movement of left wrist – 4 years”. As the pages relating to the history of James’ time in India have not survived please refer to Arthur Edward Martin’s service record contained in this pdf as he was in the same Battalion.  (James was awarded the British War medal.)

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Frederick PHILPS, Private
Killed in action 28th March 1918
Service No. 276781, AN 3128270th Field Ambulance, 1/9th  Durham Light Infantry

Frederick was born in Ombersley in 1880, and was a resident of Handsworth, Birmingham - he enlisted in Aston and was killed in action on 28th March 1918. He is buried in Gommecourt British Cemetery No.2, Hebuterne, France, Grave IV.F.12.      Frederick ‘s name was listed in the Parish News as his mother  had run The Stores in Hallow at the time of the 1901 census. In 1911 she was living at 32 McIntyre Road, off Oldbury Road with her youngest son Robert Sidney, her other six children were no longer at home) he was posthumously awarded the British War & Victory Medals. His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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William RADFORD, Private
Service Nos. 4617 / 206168 / 243130, Royal Warks Rgt./23rd Battalion Rifle Brigade/
424th Agricultural Co., Labour Corps.

William Radford was born in about 1860 at Aldershot, Hampshire, and is believed to be the son of James Radford, a private in the 10th Hussars, whose wife was named Mary. (See 1861 census for Pockthorpe, Norwich).  William was a paper hanger by trade in the early 1900’s and lived in Birmingham. He married twice, and his second wife Florence J Lewis nee Hobday, whom he married in 1918 was, in 1911 census, living with her husband of four years William Lewis and their family, Daisy, Olive and Gerald in Green Lane, Lower Broadheath. William Lewis (SN 21203) died in 1915 (please refer to the appropriate pdf.).  William Radford’s Army Service Record has not survived, but as he was in his 50’s when he was called up it is not surprising to find from the Electoral Roll Absent Voters list that he was in the 424th Agricultural Company, Labour Corps which was attached to the Worcestershire Regiment.  William and Florence had two children in the 1920’s, Betty and Mary. William died in our area in 1937.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Arthur RASTALL, Private
Service Nos. 25394 & 95718, Royal Berkshire / Labour Corps

Arthur Rastall was born in 1889 at Broadheath, his parents were Frederick and Ann Margaret Rastall nee Weaver who lived with their large family lived in Bell Lane, Lower Broadheath. In 1911 Arthur was a Gardener Nurseryman boarding in Hale,  Cheshire with Joseph Hession also a Gardener Nurseryman and his wife Gertude, their daughter and fellow Gardener Nurseryman  and boarder John Adshead. Arthur’s widowed mother was still living in Bell Lane with four of her six surviving children.  Arthur’s Army Service record has not survived but as he is first mentioned in the parish Magazine in 1918 it is likely that he was called up in 1917/1918.  The 11 Bttn of the Royal Berkshire Regiment was incorporated into the Labour Corps and they went to France (Frenchencourt) in 1916. Information about the 11th Bttn and Arthur’s name (in 160 Company) are on this website  http://www.purley.eu/RBR3143.pdf.  Arthur received the British War and Victory medals.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Fred(erick) REYNOLDS, Naval Division

No trace can be found on the National Archive website of a Fred(erick) Reynolds in the Royal Naval Division records. Men from this Division fought alongside soldiers in Gallipoli and elsewhere.  It hasn’t been possible to determine which Frederick Reynolds is mentioned in the Parish News. A Frederick Reynolds married Gertrude A Maylett from Lower Broadheath in 1920. She was born in 1887 and it is possible that Fred was the younger son of Frederick Reynolds a widower who lived in Menith Wood, Pensax. If so Fred was born in 1892. If anyone can solve this puzzle we would be very pleased to hear from you.

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William ROBERTS
Service No. 17660, 1st Worcs Regiment

He may be the William James Roberts who was born c. 1899 in Hallow and on the 1911 census appears as the adopted son of James Roberts , a plasterer aged 66 from Beckford and his wife Harriet aged 57 from Hallow. They were living at Archbell Cottages in the village.  His medal record card shows that he enlisted 17 March 1915 and served in France.  He received the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.   His name also appears on the Electoral Roll 1918.  No other information has been found.

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George Henry ROBBINS, Private
Service No. 112289, 8th/19th Welsh Pioneers / Welsh Rgt

George Henry Robbins was born in Evesham in 1890. He was one of the sons of Wilson and Sarah Robbins nee Haines who lived at Culliters Cottage, Broadheath at the time of the 1911 census. George was shown as an Under Gardener. His name first appears in Intercessory Prayers in the Parish Magazine in August 1915 and he is on the Absent Voters List for 1919.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Joseph Frederick ROBBINS, Private
Died of his wounds 12th May 1915
Service No. 14503, 4/8th Worcs Regiment

Joseph Frederick Robbins as born in the parish of St Stephens, Worcester in 1895.  He was one of the sons of Wilson and Sarah Robbins nee Haines  who lived at Culliters Cottage, Broadheath at the time of the 1911 census. Joseph was shown as a Waggoner Boy on Farm.  Joseph died  of wounds aged 20 on 12th May 1915 , and he is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, Grave A.144.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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George John ROGERS, Gunner
Service Nos. 831215 & 3272, 306th Royal Field Artillery, Worcester

George John Rogers was born in 1882 at White Cross, Hereford, his father Albert died in 1899 and his mother Jane Rogers is shown on the 1901 census living at the Dew Drop Inn at Broadheath with her large family.  George married Fanny Smith in 1905.  By the time of the 1911 census they had two young boys Denis and David and later lived in Partridge Lane, Broadheath.  His name first appears in the August 1915 edition of the Parish Magazine and his name is on the Broadheath Roll of Honour.   No other information has been found. (Brother William is below)

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William Albert ROGERS, Driver
Service Nos. 3069 & SN 830157, 48th Div., 241st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, Worcester

William was born in 1896 and was the very much younger brother of George mentioned above. His father Albert William had died in 1899 and his mother was the publican at the Dewdrop Inn, Bell Lane, Broadheath. William, who was a baker, enlisted voluntarily in February 1914 and joined the RFA on 9 February 1915. William was with 241 Brigade (previously known as 2nd South Midland Brigade) when he joined the Expeditionary Force in France from 10 July 1915 to 19 November 1917, he was then posted to Italy on 29 April 1918 and fourteen days later was posted to C/241 Brigade.   More information about the Brigade in France and Italy will be found here:-
William was posted to No 4 Depot 3 February 1919 and two days later  was posted to a/4 Reserve Brigade. He was disembodied on demobilisation on 27 May 1919.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Edgar Charles aka Eddy ROSSER, Private
Service Nos. 38203 & 544269, Worcs Rgt / Labour Corps

Edgar was born in 1893 in Gailey, Staffordshire, one of the four children of Edward and Gertrude Rosser nee Creed. The family were living at Birchenwood Farm, Lower Broadheath at the time of the 1911 census.  He is first mentioned in Intercessory Prayers in the Parish Magazine for July August 1918.  Edgar’s Army Service record has not survived. The Medal Card Index shows he received the British War and Victory medals.  Edgar is on the Absent Voters List for 1918/1919 and the Roll of Honour, Broadheath Village Hall.

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Albert William SENTER, Corporal
Service No. 3/7202, 2nd Somerset Light Infantry

Albert William was born 1884 in Hallow and was the eldest son of William and Emma Senter late Turner who were living in Heath Lane, Lower Broadheath in 1911.  His medal card shows that Ernest served in France from 20.7.15, and he was awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.  No other information can be found as his Army Service record has not survived.  Information about the Somerset Light Infantry can be found here
http://www.1914-1918.net/somersets.htm and if he was in the regular rather than territorial battalion Albert will have spent the War in India.
He is first mentioned for the Intercessory Prayers in the Parish Magazine in August 1915 -1916. The Absent Voters List for 1919 indicates that he was living in Bell Lane, Broadheath.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Ernest Henry SENTER, Corporal
Service Nos.  181724 & W/R 257401, RE & B.E.F.

Ernest H Senter was born in 1889 in Lower Broadheath, the son of William and Emma Senter.  William had been born in Norfolk and his wife in Wichenford, Worcs. Ernest enlisted in the Regular Army as a private on 7 December 1915 and was placed in Reserve the following day. Ernest lived in Derby when he enlisted but later gave his address as Martley Road, Lower Broadheath. He was a Railway Driving Car Attendant (Waiter) for the Midland Railway. Ernest was mobilised as a Sapper in the Royal Engineers, Railway and Canal Troops, Railway Operating Division (R.O.D.) on 15 June 1916 having received a satisfactory Medical Certificate when he was examined at The Midland Grand Hotel. He and his wife Mary nee Alford had two children Cyril and Leslie, before he joined the Army, Two other children, Ruby and John, were born in 1918 and 1920 respectively in the Worcester area.  Ernest embarked to France on 11 September 1916. Unfortunately his Army Record does not contain any details of where he was posted, but he was a Shunter. Ernest had leave to return to the UK from 24 August to 3 September 1917 and again the following September for 14 days. In May of 1917 he had been promoted to “2nd Corpl”.  Awarded a Good Conduct Badge in 1918 Ernest was still serving in December 1918 when he was admitted to hospital with an unspecified illness. On May 26 1919 Ernest H Senter WR/257401 was certified as being a Corporal, he was re-mustered as an A/Sgt in Boulogne, a Yardmaster who had executed a piece of work which was equivalent to a test laid down by Corps Memoranda for the “Very Superior” rate of pay and it was recommended that his Engineer pay be increased from 1s 8d to 2s. This was authorised at Boulogne on 1 June 1919 and he returned to England “Long Service” in August 1919. He was awarded the British War medal and the Victory Medal which he received in 1922. He died in the Worcester area in 1953.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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(Frank) Francis James SENTER, Driver
Service Nos. 1002 & 845749, 2nd Sect. 61st D.A. Col., Royal Field Artillery, Worcester

Frank James Senter a baker was one the seven children of William and Emma Senter. He was born in 1890 and his Army attestation papers state that he was living in Heath Lane, Broadheath on 3 June 1915 and that his service number was 3400 amended to 845749, Frank was classed as a Driver in the 3/2nd South Midland Brigade SFA. (South Midland Divisional Ammunition Column) He was embodied on the same date into the RFA and transferred 7th months later to DAC 61st which was made up of servicemen from the South Midlands Brigade. On 5 May 1916 King George V inspected the Division at Bulford, Salisbury Plain and Frank left for France on the 25 May. This website  http://www.1914-1918.net/61div.htm  gives details of where the 61st Division were in France and the attack at Fromelles and the ramifications for the 61st Division.  Frank served 2 years 142 days before he went on furlough for 14 days from the 24 September 1918.  On 13 June 1919 Frank was examined prior to demobilisation at Outrebois, 21 miles Northeast of Abbeville in the Somme Department. He was given another 14 days leave in early July 1919 and was finally demobilised  from the Army at Fovant in Hampshire on the 17th July  His campaign medals were the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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William Robert SHERGOLD,
Service No. 2255 or 02255, Army Veterinary Corps.

William Robert Shergold was the son of George and Jane Shergold, he was born in Martley in 1897 and was working as a servant on Boyce Farm, Bringsty, Herefordshire at the time of the 1911 census. In the same census his parents and sisters lived at Middle Temple Laugherne, Lower Broadheath, where George was a Fruit Grower. William’s military record has not survived. He died in Shropshire in 1977.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Albert SMITH
Service No. 50843, 1st Royal Warks.

Albert was born 28th October 1899 at Crown East, Worcester
and lived at Kenswick, Lower Broadheath.  Albert died at Ypres
as noted in the Parish magazine for September 1915)






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Frederick O. SMITH, Acting Corporal
Service No. 37849, Royal Field Artillery/ Worcs Rgt

Frederick’s name is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall, and the Absent Voters List 1918 showed that he lived at The Hollies, Broadheath.  No other information has been found.
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Sam SMITH, A.S.C.
His name appeared in the Parish magazine of January 1916 (Noted in October 1916 as "at home").  No other information is known at present


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Samuel SMITH, Private
Service Nos. 24632 & 42836, Machine Gun Corps / 10th Worcs Regt



Samuel is mentioned in the Parish News of September 1914.  The Absent Voters List of 1919 showed that he lived at Kenswick, Lower Broadheath but he is also recorded as dwelling at The Little Cob House, Wichenford.  He was reported as missing (18th Worcs.), later known to be a prisoner of war in Germany.

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Walter SMITH, Private
Killed in action 9th May 1915
Service No. 7030, 1st Battalion Worcs Regt.

Walter was born and enlisted in Worcester.  He was  killed in action 9th May 1915, and is commemorated on Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, Panel 5.  Walter has no known grave.  (For more information, click here).
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.


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Walter SMITH, A.V.C.
Noted in Parish magazine July 1916 - no other information is known as yet.
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CAPTAIN STANLEY

The Parish Magazine of July 1917 (Broadheath section) records that Captain Stanley was awarded the Legion of Honour by the French Government.  No other information has been found.

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Bryce STEVENSON, Private
Service Nos. 2866 & 300231, Staffs. Yeomanry (Queen's Own Royal  Rgt.) / Corps of Hussars

Bryce Stevenson is one of the four Stevenson brothers remembered on Broadheath’s Roll of Honour. Bryce was born in 1889 at Bromsgrove. His parents were David Robert Stevenson a farmer and his wife Annie. They were living at the Bank House, Chadwich in 1911, but Bryce was not one of the five of their eleven children still at home. He was a Commercial traveller boarding with George (a draughtsman) and Annie Talbot in Stafford. He married Dora Scott in the Stafford area in 1921 died in 1940. The Medal Card Index shows that Bryce served from 10.11.15 (Egypt) to 3.7.19 and he was awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.   (“in the 1920’s their younger brother David Chad Stevenson farmed at Kenswick Mill Farm, so perhaps their parents had moved into our area during the War.”)
Brothers George, James and Thomas are shown below.

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George Robert STEVENSON, Sergeant
Service Nos. 437135 (AVL) or 2001 (MCI), RAMC

George  was born in Bromsgrove in 1883, the second eldest son of David Robert Stevenson, a farmer and his wife Annie. They were living at the Bank House, Chadwich in 1911. They had 11 children, and although 5 were still at home George was a Banker’s clerk, boarding with Harry and Annie Brown at Blackwell House, Blackwell, Bromsgrove. Mr Brown was a Coal, Corn and Forage Merchant.
George’s Army Service record does not seem to have survived and the only information we have is from the Medal Card index which shows he served from 27.5.15 (France) to 6.5.19.  He received the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.  George married Eva Day in 1920.  (“in the 1920’s their younger brother David Chad Stevenson farmed at Kenswick Mill Farm, so perhaps their parents had moved into our area during the War.”)
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers James and Thomas are below, and Bryce is above)

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James STEVENSON, 2nd Lieutenant, RAF

James Stevenson was born in Bromsgrove in 1892, one of the sons of David Robert Stevenson, a farmer and his wife Annie. They were living at the Bank House, Chadwich in 1911. They had 11 children, 5 were still at home including James who was a fitter apprentice at a motor works. James joined the RFC as a Motor Lorry Driver on 23 August 1914 and entered the RAF on 1 April 1918.  His next of kin was his father, who was by then living at The Gorse, Belbroughton, Stourbridge.
James was classed as an AM 2 (Aircraft Mechanic 2) in 1914 and the following RFC promotions followed:-
AM1 – 1 January 1916, Corporal - 1 July 1916, Sergeant 1 March 1917, Flight Sergeant -1 October 1917. Throughout this time James was serving in France.  (“in the 1920’s their younger brother David Chad Stevenson farmed at Kenswick Mill Farm, so perhaps their parents had moved into our area during the War.”)
On 1 April 1918 James was transferred to the RAF as F Ch Mech (Foreman Chief Mechanic?) and remained in France until 13 August 1918.
James was “discharged to commission” on 20 November 1918. He held the rank of 2nd Lieutenant on the Absent Voters List for 1918. James was awarded the Meritorious Service medal in 1919 and the 1914/15 Star. In 1921 he received the British War and Victory Medals.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Bryce and George are above, and Thomas is below)

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Thomas STEVENSON

Thomas William Stevenson was born in Bromsgrove in 1882, the eldest son of David and Annie Stevenson.  Davis was a farmer and they were living at the Bank House, Chadwich, Bromsgrove in 1911 with 5 of their 11 children. Thomas was, however, living in Brynmawr, Crickhowell Breconshire where he was a “Draper’s Traveller (Credit)”. His service record has not been found.  (“in the 1920’s their younger brother David Chad Stevenson farmed at Kenswick Mill Farm, so perhaps their parents had moved into our area during the War.”)
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Tom STINTON, Captain, 1/8th Worcs Regt

The Absent Voters List 1918 showed that Tom lived at Mill Cottages, Broadheath. No other information has been found.

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Charles Handley Lanphier Symons, 2nd Lieutenant
Killed in Action 20th November 1917
5th attchd. 8th Royal Fusiliers

The son of the Very Rev. Dean Symons and E. Symons, of the Deanery, 17 Hankow Rd., Shanghai, China.  Charles died 20 November 1917 aged 29.  He is  commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France, Panel 3 and 4.  (Charles has no known grave.) He is named on Christchurch Broadheath Memorial and the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Eric is noted below)

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Eric Clarence SYMONS, 2nd Lieutenant
Killed in action 1st September 1916
98th Battalion Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)


Eric died aged 22 years on 1st September 1916.  He was the son of the Very Rev. Dean C.J.F. Symons, M.A., and Mrs Symons of the Deanery, Shanghai, China, and he is buried in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L'abbe, France, Grave III.E.17.  He is named on Christchurch Broadheath War Memorial and the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brother Charles is noted above)

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Albert Edward TAYLOR, Private
Service No. 203402, 2/7th Worcs Regt

Albert Edward aka Bertie Taylor was born in Hallow in about 1880.  His parents were Henry and Ellen Taylor nee Spiers who married at Hallow.  By 1911 the family had moved to Northfield Street in the Arboretum.  Henry was a general Labourer and Bertie a general Carter.  His Army Service record has not survived.

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Cecil Charles TOWNSEND, Driver
Service No. 165203, Royal Engineers

Cecil Charles Townsend 1896-1968 was the son of Charles and Alice Townsend and according to the Absent Voters List, lived in Lower Broadheath where Charles was a Nurseryman in 1911.  Cecil’s Army Record does not appear to have survived.  The only information we have is from the Medal Card Index which shows he received the British War and Victory Medals.  He may have married Gladys V. Palmer in 1928.  For information about Cecil’s career as a successful rose-grower and the location of the fields of roses, please go to this website
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Charles TOWNSEND, Driver
Service Nos. 3625 & SN 831209, 3 Battery 2nd South Midland Brigade Royal Field Artillery, Worcester
7th Reserve Brigade, 627th Agricultural Company

Charles Townsend was born c. 1891 the son of William and Jane Townsend.  Jane was a widow by 1901 and was living in Partridge Lane, Lower Broadheath.  Charles first joined 3 Battery 2nd South Midlands Brigade RFA (Reserve) (SN 3625) on 17 May 1915, and on 25 May arrived at Le Havre.  (Elsewhere in his file it is stated that he went to France 23 May 1916).  Charles may have been with the F/4th Reserve Brigade RFA  when on 25 August 1917 he received a gunshot wound to his left shoulder and was admitted to 12 Casualty Clearing Station which was at Needinghem at that time, before being transferred to  55 General Hospital Boulogne (believed to have been at nearby Wimereux).  On 7 September his mother was advised of his injury and on the same date Charles was sent to the War Hospital at Reading (the former Reading Union Workhouse) and ten days later to the Military Hospital Shorncliffe, Kent.  Charles spent a total of 32 days in hospital.

On 2 November 1917 he “joined” the 4th Reserve Brigade (TF) RFA and on 10 December 1917 was posted to A Battery 186 Brigade (2/2nd West Riding) attached to 62nd Div. and is likely to have participated in the First Battles of the Somme (Bapaume and First Battle of Arras), Battles of the Marne (Tardenois, Scarpe  and the Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line).  Charles was classified for Class 1 Rate of Proficiency Pay in August 1918.  He was in hospital for a knee problem for 16 days being discharged on 24 September 1918. This was followed by a seven day furlough after which Charles was admitted to hospital from 1 October 1918 for 38 days with an abcess on the knee.  On 9th November it appears he was at/or attached to RH Depot Ripon (S) and was Classed as Category A3 (previously A1). Charles was posted to High Wycombe 4th Reserve Brigade (TF) RFA and from there on 12 December 1918 attached to the 627 Agricultural Company as a Driver, ploughing at Worcester.  Charles “dispersal” took place from Chiseldon on 23 February 1919.  He was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Alfred James TURNER

Alfred 1881-1951 married to Emily Jane Morris in 1905 by the time of the 1911 census they were living with their three children in Upper Broadheath where Alfred was a bricklayer. It has not been possible to find out any more information about this serviceman.

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Alfred VOBE, Private
Service No. 17/14154, 17th Lancs. Fusiliers

Alfred – Alfie – as he was known was 36 years of age and a gardener employed by Admiral Cuming at Eastbury Manor, Broadheath when he enlisted on 4 December 1914. He and his wife Helen/Ellen nee Rowberry had three children before the start of the Great War, another child, Vernon, was born in 1915 but five months later had died of bronchitis. Alfie served with the Lancashire Fusiliers and was quickly promoted to Lance Corporal in February 1915 and just a month later was a Corporal in the 3rd Battalion. At the beginning of January 1916 he was posted to France. In October he was diagnosed with Shell Shock and returned to a hospital in the UK. His Army Record is fire damaged and the reason that he was reduced to the ranks on 18 June 1917 cannot be seen, but Shell Shock must have been a contributory factor. Alfie was on furlough from 13 April 1917 until immediately before he was reduced to a private. By August he was deemed no longer physically fit for service and was discharged. He was a very sick man rated 3/10. He was given the Silver Badge, which would have been worn on the right breast or on the right lapel of a civilian jacket.  The Vobe family had moved to Raglan Street in Worcester in about 1916 and whilst Alfie was in the Army the family had received a separation allowance of 3s 6d a week, on discharge he received a pension of 3s 3d which was granted for 52 weeks and he indicated when he left hospital that he would be looking for light work. At the moment we don’t know any more about this family. Alfie died in 1942 and his wife Helen in 1958.

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Herbert James WALLIS, Colonel

Colonel Herbert James Ferryman Wallis, born on 30 September 1881, was the cousin of Robert W F Cuming. In 1891 Herbert’s father Frederick Wallis, was the senior curate of St Stephens church in Worcester and the family together with his nephew Robert Cuming were living in Lavender Road, Worcester when the 1891 census was taken. Admiral Cuming lived at Eastbury Manor and the family connection explains why Herbert was mentioned in the Parish Magazine in connection with Intercessory Prayers.  Herbert was first commissioned on 17 June 1903 and appointed 2nd Lieutenant Royal Garrison Regiment from the 6th Battalion Manchester Regiment. In 1905 he was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment). The only information found about the about the intervening years before he served in WWI,  is that he served in South Africa and held the Queen’s medal with clasps.  (For more information, click here)

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Albert WEAVER, Sergeant
Service Nos. 13793 & 24808, Machine Gun Corps/ Worcs Rgt

Albert Weaver born 1898 was one of the five surviving children of William and Sarah Jane Weaver nee Freeman. His elder brother Sidney (1894) also served in WWI.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Sidney WEAVER, Private
Killed in action 23rd February 1917
Service No. 241000, 1st/8th Worcs Regiment BEF - no. 11 Platoon "C" Co.

Sidney is first noted in the Parish Magazine of August 1915.  He died at the front aged 22 years on 23 February 1917.  He was the son of Mr W Weaver of Sandfield Villa, Heath Lane, Lwr Broadheath, and he is buried in Assevillers New British Cemetery, France, Grave IV.D.6.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Neil WEIR, Lieutenant / Captain
10th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

Neil Archibald Campbell Weir was born in 1895 in London and died in 1967. You can read about him in his grandson Mike Burns book  “Mud & Bodies. The War Diaries and Letters of Captain N A C Weir 1914-1920”. (Capt Weir saw action in Loos, the Somme, at Vimy Ridge and Ploegsteert Wood) SBN: 9781848326880. See also 
http://www.sauldavid.co.uk/books/mud-bodies/
Captain weir’s connection with the Hallow area is not known but it is likely to be with either the Cuming or Britten families.


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Albert WHEATLEY, Stoker
Killed in action 1st November 1914
Service No. SS/103386, HMS Good Hope

Albert was born 22 April 1888 in Broadheath to Philip and Jane, who had an extended family including two sons from Jane's first marriage.  They moved from The Bell, Broadheath to Hallow (1901 Census).  Albert married May Freeman in 1911 who lived 'at the back of the school.'  Albert enlisted 1906 and served on HMS Good Hope which was destroyed in the Battle of Coronel, off the coast of Chile 1st Nov. 1914.  German ships under the command of Vice Admiral Graf Maxmilian Von Spee sunk HMS Good Hope with no survivors. His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.  (For more information, click here).
(His brothers Harry, Alfred, and William are noted below)

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Harry John WHEATLEY, Private,
Died of Pneumonia early 1915
6th Worcester Regt.

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine of  September 1914 as 'in active service'.   Harry was invalided home early in 1915, returning to his regiment shortly after, but then he contracted pneumonia and, in his weakened state was unable to withstand the illness, and died (Reported in the Parish News of March 1915) - Harry was the second son of Mr & Mrs Wheatley of Poplar Cottages (Parish Magazine  March 1915).  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. (Brother Albert is noted above, and brothers Alfred, and William are below)

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Alfred WHEATLEY, Corporal, Sergeant (1916) and Physical Gymnasium Instructor (1919)
Service No.11426, 1st /3rd/6th /10th Worcs Regiment

His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of September 1914.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1915 (reported in the May edition of the Parish Magtazine).  He lived in Poplar Row, Hallow.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. (Brothers Albert and Harry are noted above, and William below).

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William WHEATLEY, Driver
Service No. 20368, 36 D A C Royal Field Artillery

His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine for February 1915 & in the Absent Voters List 1918.   In 1911 William was the only on one of his parents, Philip and Jane Wheatley nee Weaver’s six surviving children to be living with them in Poplar Row.  In 1918, he married  Beatrice Beard, the widow of Henry James Beard who had died in 1917. 
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
(Brothers Albert, Harry and Alfred are noted above)

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Arthur WHEELER,
Service No. 14497, Canadian - Fort Garry Horse, Machine Gun Section.

Arthur Wheeler was born on 16 June 1895 at Kenswick.  His parents were John and Sarah Wheeler who lived at Kenswick Cottage where John was a coachman at Kenswick Manor to retired Rear Admiral Richard Britten and later his widow Blanche Britten.  Arthur was a groom when he attested into the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force on 24 September 1914 and joined the 6th Battalion Fort Garry Horse.  He was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine for Interecessory prayers in August 1915.  Arthur may have been the Arthur Wheeler born in 1893, a groom, who left Liverpool for Canada in May 1913 on board the Allen Line  ship Virginian.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
Brother Charles is noted below

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Charles William WHEELER,
1st Canadian Mounted Rifle Brigade

Charles William Wheeler was born in Paddington, Middlesex on 11 April 1894 and was the elder brother of Arthur Wheeler shown above. His parents were John and Sarah Wheeler who lived at Kenswick Cottage, where John was a coachman at Kenswick Manor to retired Rear Admiral Richard Britten and later to his widow Blanche Britten. Charles was a Groom when he attested into the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force on 5 February 1915 and joined the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifle Brigade.:-
Charles was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine for Intercessory prayers in August 1915.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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George Henry WHITLOCK,
Service No. 52997, 7th Reserve Bttn Worcestershire Regiment

George was born 22 May 1899 and was living at The Kedges when he enlisted on 21 May 1917. His father, also George was living at Kenswick Cottages, Lower Broadheath.  Only part of George’s military record have survived. There are two scraps of paper included with his record one has a typed list of the names of other men, possibly wounded. (9614 Pte D Jones, 241234 Pte J Wilson, 37393 Pte W C Dawe, 10618 Pte G Knock). The second has a pencil note of George’s name and M H Sh.... underneath, it indicates that both of them or were sent to 2/1 Southern General Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham. 26 November 1918. George had received a gunshot wound to his left ankle. Another note indicates that George had received instruction in wire dispersal on 3rd April 1919 and should be posted to 5th Battalion. He was later assessed with a 40% disability and was to receive a weekly allowance of 16s for one year starting on 7 November 1919.  He received the Victory & British War medals.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Frank aka Francis Herbert WILDE, Private
Service No. either 113980 or SM 48245, Royal Army Medical Corps / Northants Regt

Francis Herbert Wilde/Frank was born c. 1886.   He was one of the sons of Thomas and Harriet Wilde nee Smith. By 1901 Harriet was a widow but still living at Shoulton Turn with five of her children including Frank and his older brother George. By 1911 Frank (a brick clay getter) and his brother George (a brick burner), were boarding in Ammanford. Carmarthenshire with William Finch (a Brick Setter)) also born in Hallow and his wife Sarah (born Llanegwed)  and their young daughter Maud and a visitor Rachel Davies from Llanegwed.
Frank’s Army Service record does not appear to have survived. He was awarded the British War and Victory Medals, the only information we have is that his name first appeared in the Parish Magazine in 1914 and that he was on the Electoral Roll for 1915.
Frank’s brother Charles is noted under the ‘Comer Gardens area’.

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Alfred WILLIAMS,
8th Worcs Regiment

Alfred Williams was born in 1872 in Broadheath one of the sons of Edward and Mary Williams. Alfred and his wife Elizabeth were living in Partridge Lane, Broadheath at the time of the 1911 census together with their two stepchildren whose surname was Young.  Re. his Army Service record as there are several men of the same name who served in the Worcestershire Regiment we are unable to identify which of the following service numbers may be his.
4419 with 241447 (MCI British & Victory, 4591 and 530953 Lab Corps (MCI British & Victory) and 44419 (MCI Victory)

His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Ernest James WILLIS, Private
Service Nos. 52468, 27314 & 76886, Worcs Rgt/Kings Shrops Lt Infantry or 6th Batt. Somerset Lt Infantry /King's Own Yorks L.I.

Ernest, born 1888 or 1889,  was the eldest son of James and Ellen Louisa Willis who lived in a cottage at The Knoll, Broadheath in 1901 and by 1911 lived at Ashfields in Hallow. At the time of the 1911 census they had five children and Ellen’s sister Jane Wheatley aged 16 was living with them.  Ernest’s service records have not survived and the following information is from the Parish Magazine for July August 1918 which records him as a Prisoner of War.  He is on the Roll of Honour and AVL1919. He married Nellie Gummery in 1922 at Clement’s church, Worcester.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Victor Frederick WILLMONT, Gunner
Service No. 136255, Royal Garrison Artillery

Victor was born in London 1881 to Frederick and Charlotte Willmont. They moved to Worcester sometime before 1890. Victor was a shop assistant who lived at The Knoll Cottage, Broadheath. He had married Florence Tarrant in 1913 and they had one son Dennis born in 1914. Victor was a Reservist who joined the Royal Garrison Artillery in February 1917. He was classified as BI as he needed glasses and was deemed suitable for Garrison abroad. Only part of Victor’s military has survived - it indicates that he was posted as a Gunner. On 27 September 1918 he had an infective (stet) ulcer of the cornea of the right eye and was at Falmouth Military Hospital for a month. At some point he was attached to the 3rd Depot 1st Fire Command. He was demobilised on 12 March 1919. Victor died in 1946.  His name is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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John WILSON, Driver
Service No. 19763, 3 / 4 South Midland  Brigade/RH & Royal Field Artillery, Worcs.

John Wilson was an Engine Cleaner born in Wales in 1894. His parents William Keen Wilson and his mother Mary Jane had moved to Worcester-shire before 1902 and lived at Kenswick Cottage. John attested on 2 June 1915 for the South Midland Brigade RFA as a (Horse) Driver and was embodied into the RFA  and transferred to S. Mid DAC 61st on 29 January 1916. John embarked to France on 26 May 1916 and two weeks later spent 10 days in hospital with Impetigo. In February 1917 he was posted to 26th? DAC and was in the 91 Fd Amb facility receiving treatment for a scalp wound following a fall from a horse in April 1917. He was committed to hospital in October 1917 and was well enough to subsequently go on 10 days leave with ration allowance.  He was posted on 13 May 1918 to 306th Brigade. In other parts of his Army record the dates he was with various units are not clear, and so it’s not possible to determine where he was and what he might have been doing. Most of his service was with the 61st DAC.
A history of the 2nd S Midlands (61st DAC) can be found here
On 20 November 1918 he was granted a fortnight’s leave to the UK via Boulogne  and got married at Upton on Severn on the 25th of the month to Jessie Sarah Vernall. Their home address was c/o The Bowling Green, Powick, Worcs. (In the 1920’s they had two children).
John was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War Medals. He died in this area in 1962.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
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(Arthur) William WINDERS, Private
Service Nos. 20897, 480341 & T 343245 (ASC), 5th Worcs Regt./ 
Agric. Labour Corps./ASC

Arthur, known as William, was born in Broadheath in about 1880 the son of William and Fanny Winders nee Rastall. William married Jessie Freeman at St John in Bedwardine church in 1902 and they had two children who were both born in Broadheath - Cecil William (born 1905) and Reginald Lawson (1907).  William had previously served four years in the Worcestershire Yeomanry when he enlisted on 7 January 1915. He was a 34 year old labourer, home address Sandfield Villa, Lower Broadheath. A full medical record has not survived, all we know is that his vision was for both eyes 6/9 and that he was classed as medical category B3.  His Conduct Sheet shows that in 1915 whilst at Fort Tregantle, a training base near Plymouth, William overstayed his pass by nearly 4 days for which he was confined to barracks for 10 days and forfeited 5 days’ pay. He received similar treatment for another pass overstay and other misdemeanours.   On 10 December 1916 William seems to have been attached to No 1 Base Depot at Le Havre and then with 4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment in Rouen. Within a fortnight he had proceeded to 3rd Battalion in the Field. Later he was classified PB which meant he was unsuitable, except at Permanent Base.  18 March 1917 transferred to duty as a driver OC ASC Base Depot Le Havre / 9 May 1917 – D A G 3rd Echelon Rouen (where general manpower services were provided to support those in the Field).Transferred to ASC as Driver. (“Driver” here means Horse Driving which is confirmed elsewhere in his file) / 24 May 1917 – C/5554 In the Field Transferred to ASC (Horse Transport section) Compulsory in Interests of the Service in the rank of Driver & at ord. ASC rates of pay 1/2d 6 C Pay. Posted ASC Base Depot. “ / 18 June 1917 admitted to 25 General Hospital (Eczema) /3 July 1917- Res. to Duty at 25 Gen Hospital /July 1917 He attended a Special Medical Board unfortunately the pencil writing is indistinct, but there must have been sufficient reason to transfer him from the ASC. /29 August 1917 transferred to England for Agricultural Work and his Army service number changed to 408341 /14 November 1917 424 Ag Coy, Depot Worcestershire Regiment /19 April 1918 – Posted to 627 Ag. Coy. Worcestershire Regiment (Both 424 and 627 worked in the Regiment’s vegetable garden) /19 February 1919 proceeded to dispersal 20 March 1919 transferred to Class Z Army Reserve. “Character good”.
His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.

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Albert WOOD, Warwickshire Rgt.

Mentioned in the Parish News of July/August 1918 – no other information has been found.

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Arthur WOOD, Royal Field Artillery

Mentioned in the Parish News of July/August 1918 – no other information has been found.

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H WOOD

This soldier is named on the Roll of Honour, Broadheath Village Hall but no further information is known.

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Thomas WOOD (Junior), Private
Service No. G/17146, Royal Sussex.

Thomas is named on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. He lived at Lovington, Broadheath.  No other information has been found.

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Harry WOODHALL, Lance Corporal
Service No. 52796, 3rd Durham Lt Infantry, Depot Durham L.I.

Harry is on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. The Worcs. Archives notes that  L/Cpl Harry Woodhall was awarded the Military Medal June 7th 1917, wounded in the shoulder June 11th 1917. Harry lived at Temple Laugherne, Broadheath.

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Ernest WRIGHT, 2nd Worcs Regiment

This is believed to be Ernest James Wright born 1886 in Shrawley, one of the sons of William Henry and Emily Wright nee Harbon who lived at Dines Green, Lower Broadheath. William Henry was a Waggoner born in Bradley Green and Emily was born in Grimley. Ernest enlisted in 1903 into the Worcestershire Regiment and would normally have served 12 years. It seems that at the end of the 12 years he was transferred to the 1st Class Army Reserve 2nd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment for a further year.
During the War Ernest was Home from 5 August to 31 August 1914 and was then posted with the Expeditionary Force to France until 22 November 1914 when he returned Home and was discharged aged 31 on 25 January 1916 (Kings Regs para 382 xxi) having served for 13 years. His “Military Character was Very Good”. And his Character awarded in accordance with King’s Regulations was “Sober, honest and reliable. Before enlisting he was a labourer, and while on the Reserve was a collier. Has served with the Mounted Infantry and has been employed as a groom, and is good and quiet with horses. He served with Expeditionary Force in France, for five months, and wishes for employment as a collier.” Signed by the Lieutenant Colonel of the 6th Battalion Worcestershire regiment.  (Elsewhere it was stated that Ernest wished to work as a Groom.) Ernest was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British War and Victory Medals.
(Brothers Walter and William are noted below)

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Walter WRIGHT,
Possible Service Nos. 10161(3rd) 13152(3rd L.Cpl), 25312, 3315, 42439, 63401, 64215, 6680
8th Worcs Regiment

This is believed to be Walter Wright born 1896 one of the sons of William Henry and Emily Wright nee Harbon who lived at Dines Green, Lower Broadheath. William Henry was a Waggoner born in Bradley Green and Emily was born in Grimley. Walter is first mentioned in the Parish magazine for Intercessory prayers in January 1915 and so may have enlisted about that time. His Army Service record has not survived and without a definitive Service Number this all the information we have at the moment. (Brothers Ernest noted above, and William below)

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William WRIGHT, 6th Worcs Regiment

This may be the William George born 1878 the elder brother of Ernest and Walter Wright. Parents William Henry and Emily Wright nee Harbon who lived at Dines Green, Lower Broadheath. William Henry was a Waggoner born in Bradley Green and Emily was born in Grimley. William is first mentioned in the Parish magazine for Interecessory prayers in August 1915 and the Parish Magazine for July 1917 mentions that he as in hospital with shellshock.
(Brothers Ernest and Walter are noted above)

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William Charles Price WRIGHT, Lieutenant
Oxford & Bucks. Light Infantry

The Imperial War Museum’s  “Lives of the First World War” has further information about William’s military service.
RE Northumberland Fusiliers Corporal SN 1876; Northumberland Fusiliers Temp Lieutenant; RAOC Temporary Lieutenant; Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Regiment, Lieutenant.
William Charles Price Wright was born in Long Eaton Derby and was the son of Harry and Louise Wright. Harry was a nurseryman originally from Honiton in Devon and in 1911 the family were living at Upper Broadheath.  His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall.
This is all the information we have at the moment.


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Acknowledgements:

Names of those servicemen who died during The Great War have been taken from church memorials in Hallow, Broadheath and Comer Gardens, also the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. The website 'Remember The Fallen' has kindly given permission for us to use its research and record it with our own.

The archives held at The Hive, Worcester, and websites Ancestry co.uk and Find My Past have also been instrumental in our research, for which we are most grateful.