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1914-1918 THE GREAT WAR - SERVICE PERSONNEL FROM THE HALLOW AREA

1914-1918 THE GREAT WAR - SERVICE PERSONNEL FROM THE 
HALLOW AREA


Herbert Mayow ADAMS, Second Lieutenant
2/8th Worcs Regiment (Reserve) / Machine Gun Corps

Herbert was born in Sydenham, Kent in 1893, son of George and Rose. In 1905, they lived at Blea Beck, Hallow, moving in 1910 to Hallow Bank.  In 1911 Census, Herbert was a Civil Service Probate Registrar, and also a student at Marlborough College, Wilts. He enlisted c. April 1915 and by January 1916 was 2nd Lieutenant, 2/8th Worcs Rgt.  He was invested by the King at Buckingham Palace 13th April 1918 with the Military Cross (Engagement: Cambrai 1917). Herbert died in 1985 aged 92. (For his story, click here). 
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Frank Herbert ALLEN, Private
Killed in action 24th October 1917
Service No. 201561, 2nd/7th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Frank was born in Hallow 1887, and lived in Parkfield Lane with his father, Thomas (cowman) and mother Fanny, and 5 sisters and 3 brothers. He married Annie Olive Walton in 1907 (Dudley Registration District) and lived with his in-laws at Neptune St., Tipton.(Census 1911). At that time there were two children, son Leslie Frank and daughter, Audrey Winifred. He worked as a labourer. He was sent to France and Flanders, and killed in action 24th October 1917. He is commemorated on Arras Memorial, France, Bay 6. Frank Allen has no known grave.
Brothers Joseph and Henry are shown below.
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Joseph Thomas ALLEN, Private/Sapper
Service No. WR/297203, Army Service Corps (Horse Transport) / RE Railway Troops

Joseph was born in Hallow 1890 and lived in Parkfield Lane, Hallow (census 1901). Joseph worked as a Porter Shunter, and was living in Tipton with his brother, when he enlisted 20 Jan 1915 at Dudley. He served in Salonica for two years before sustaining a broken arm, and severe contusions - 15% disability (1918) and again, a fracture of his left radius (1919). He was invalided to the UK March 1919 and demobbed July 1919. His service record noted 'he was of good character'
Brother Frank is noted above, and Henry below.
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Henry (aka Harry) George ALLEN, Private/Bombardier/Driver
Service No. 76590, Royal Field Artillery, Small Arms Ammunition Column

Henry was born 1895 in Hallow to Thomas and Fanny, and lived in Parkfield Lane, Hallow. The Census of 1911 stated he was a bricklayer's apprentice. His medal card showed that he served as a Bombardier and was reduced to the rank of Driver in May 1915. (He first served in the '3 Egypt Theatre of War'.)  He received the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals. No other service history can be found. (Henry was recorded on the Absent Voters Lists of 1918 & 1919)
His brothers Frank and Joseph are noted above.
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George Henry ALLEN, Private
Service Nos. 240774 / 661102, 2nd/8th Worcs Regt / Labour Corps

Mentioned in the Parish Magazine of August 1915.  Also Worcs. Archives  records  Pte. G. Allen joined territorials 2nd/8th Worcs Rgt. September 1914, and served 2 years and 3 months in France. He fought in the Battle of the Somme in 1916, Arras 1917, 3rd Battle Ypres 1917, Cambrai 1917. He was also involved in the Relief of the French at St ?? (Poss. St. Juliaan) in January 1918. In March (27th) he was wounded having one finger blown off by a bullet. He received the Victory and British War medals.
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Tom (H) ALLEN, Private
Service No. 241094, B. Co. 2nd/8th Worcs Regt/Royal Field Artillery, Worcs.

Thomas was born c.1893 to Joseph (farm labourer) and Amelia (Census 1911). He had one brother and a sister. The family lived at Eastbury Cottages, Lower Broadheath. Thomas enlisted c. Aug 1915 (Parish Magazine).  Tom is mentioned in the Parish Magazine of July/August 1918. It’s possible that Tom was a prisoner of war.  No other information has been found.
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Thomas H. AMPHLETT, Private
Service Nos. 3413 / R/387260,  8th Worcs Regt/Army Service Corps, 436th Labour Co.

Born c. 1877 to parents John and Mary, Thomas had one sister, Lillie, and lived at Leigh Cottage, Hallow. He was a capstan youth, and labourer/truck loader on the Railway. He was awarded the Victory & British War medals - no other service records found. His name was on the Absent Voters List of 1918.
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Albert John ASPEY, Driver
Service No. 651830, 885 Battery, B325 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

Albert was born c. 1898 and lived with parents, William and Jessie at Camp Lane, Hallow (Census 1911).  He had 12 brothers and sisters.  His father worked as a coal wharf labourer, Worcester Co-op Society. No service record or medal card can be found for Albert. His name was on the Absent Voters Lists of 1918 & 1919.  Brothers Henry and William are shown below.
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Henry (aka Harry) Walter ASPEY, Private
Service Nos. 17882 (Private) and 342025 (Labour Corps ), 8/10th Worcs Rgt/Labour Corps.

Henry was born c. 1896 and lived with parents, William and Jessie at Camp Lane, Hallow (Census 1911).  He had 12 brothers and sisters.  His father worked as a coal wharf labourer, Worcester Co-op Society. Enlisted c. 1914, the April 1915 Parish magazine noted Henry as being in active service in France.  In 1916 he was transferred to the Labour Corps and discharged in Feb 1918. He lived in a cottage, Hallow Green.  His Medal card states he was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals. No other service record has been found.  (Brother Albert is above, and William below).
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William George ASPEY, Private
Service No. 326759, Glos. Yeomanry / Corps of Hussars

William was born c. 1891 in St Johns, Worcester and lived with parents, William and Jessie at Camp Lane, Hallow (Census 1911).   He had 12 brothers and sisters.  His father worked as a coal wharf labourer, Worcester Co-op Society.  His name was first noted in the December 1915 Parish magazine, and his medal card stated he received the Victory and British War medals. (No other service record can be found)  Brothers Albert and Henry are above)
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Walter BATCHELOR, Staff Sergeant and Warrant Officer 2
Service No. S/3843, Army Ordnance Corps

Walter was born in 1881, and lived with his father George (railway goods checker) and mother Ann, and two sisters, Alice and Sarah, and brother John. They lived in Park Lane, Hallow. He married Annie Louisa (nee Plummer) 25 November 1911 and had two children, son Louis and daughter Kathleen. They lived at 30 Harbour View Queenstown, Ireland, changing address in 1920 to South Wales. Walter worked as a harness maker, and enlisted Jan 1899, and after training, served as saddler, being promoted over 18 years to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant. He served in South Africa 1899 to 1902, and 1914, and in Havre, France 1914.  He was demobbed in January 1920 to a new address in South Wales, and was awarded the Medal for South Africa 1899 and 1902, with Clasp, and 1914 Star.
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Henry James BEARD, Private
Died 23rd April 1917
Service Nos. 3915 & 241267, 8th Battalion Worcs Regiment/4th Battalion
(shown on Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Henry was born c. 1889 in Weston Super Mare, and in 1911 was living with his wife Beatrice Mary Aldean at Green Street Cottages, Hallow with their 1 month old daughter, Aldean Mary. Henry was a wagoner on a farm.  He was the stepson of George Hill and his wife Emily Eliza nee Beard of Moseley Turning, Hallow.  Henry died 23rd April 1917 aged 28. (Beatrice re-married in 1918 to William Wheatley of Pool Cottage, Hallow.) Henry is commemorated on Arras Memorial, France, Bay 6. There is no known grave for Henry. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. (No service record has been found).
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Thomas BEARD, Private
Service Nos. 203817 (Worcs) & 49479 (Gloucs), 1/7th Worcs Regiment & Gloucs. Rgt.

Thomas Beard was born about 1886 to Emily Eliza Beard.  She married George Hill a labourer and at the time of the 1911 census they were living at Moseley Turning with Thomas and his five half brothers and sisters.  His name is first recorded in the Parish Magazine for August 1916, and again on the Absent Voters List of 1918.  No other information can be found.
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Leonard BLINCOE, birth name BLINCOW, Gunner
Service Nos. 1066 / 830192, Royal Field Artillery

Leonard Blincow appeared on the 1911 census as a 15 year old GWR sheet repairer who was born in Blockley, Worcs. His father Edward was a GWR Policeman. The family were living at 42 Holly Mount Road, Tunnell Hill, Worcester, not far from Shrub Hill Station. Leonard enlisted in the 2nd Mid Bde/ D 46th on 2 December 1912 at the age of 17 and served as a gunner in the UK until 23 May 1916 when he joined the BEF for 3 years. Within a month he had suffered a shrapnel wound to his chin. The Long, Long Trail website gives details of the battles in which his brigade were involved. http://www.1914-1918.net/   In 7 June 1917 he married Jane Wheatley from Hallow, (see Wheatley brothers) and this is why he appears in Hallow records.  Leonard enquired on 20 November 1917 if he was eligible for £15 Bounty (for 5 years service) and a month’s leave. The form states that he would be eligible on 2 December 1917, and although the £15 was granted, he was only issued with £5 on 2 December. The next legible comment relates to the will that Leonard had written. The records seem to show that he was demobilized on 12 June 1919, but elsewhere his service has been reckoned until 3 March 1920. The Parish Magazine of June 1917, Medal Card Index I and census returns, stated his name as Blincow.  However, his marriage 1917 to Jane Wheatley and his death are registered as Blincoe.
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William (aka Willie) Alfred BLISSETT, Private
Died 26th September 1915
Service No.19139, 4th Battalion, 12th and 13th Worcs Regiment

Willie was born in 1894 in Hallow. He appears with his parents Alfred (a labourer at a vinegar works) and Elizabeth, and six of his seven siblings on the 1911 census living at School Cottages, Hallow. William worked as a Show-room boy at the Royal Worcester Porcelain works.  First noted in the Parish Magazine ‘in active service April 1915′, he died 26 September 1915 aged 21.   The memorial states 'Son of Alfred and Elizabeth Blissett, "South View" Hallow.'  He is buried in Azmak Cemetery, Suvla, Turkey, Grave I. B. 13.  He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals.  The Theatre of War he first served in was (2B) Balkans (Sept 1915) - no other service record can be found.


This cross in memory of William can be found in the Hallow church graveyard.


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John Herbert BOOTH,
Service No. 2/TSR 03080, Army Service Corps No. 1 Coy. / Horse Transport

Born in James St., Worcester c. 1872, John lived with his parents, John & Ann, and 4 sisters and one brother. He served in the Worcs. R.F.A. Territorials before enlisting, aged 42, on March 1, 1915 for A.S.C. Horse Transport. He worked as a Painter. He married Agnes (nee Rushton) in 1897 and lived in Moseley Road, Hallow. By 1915, they had 4 sons and 1 daughter. He was sent to Salonica, returning home April 1917, and was discharged from active service due to heart valvular disease. His records state that John "was very good, a sober, willing, honest and trustworthy man, used to the care of horses." He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, Victory & British War medals, and he died Sept 1945 aged 73.
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Ernest Edward BOULTON, Private
Service Nos. 38317 / 29400, 8th Worcs Regt. / Royal Army Medical Corps/ 7th East Yorks Regt.

Ernest was born c. 1892 in Kinsham, Glos. (Kinsham is near Tewkesbury and is now classified as Worcs.) His father, John was a corporation labourer in 1911, and previously in 1871 he had been a live-in servant (baker and wagoner) in Oxenton, Glos.  Ernest's mother was Sarah, and he had 3 brothers and 2 sisters (Census 1911) and the family lived at Archbell Cottages, Hallow.  Ernest was a gardener labourer but by 1920 he was a market gardener in Hallow.   In 1921 he married Ivy May (nee Hodges).  Ivy was born in Hallow c. 1899 and in 1911 she lived at 26 East Comer, Worcester.  Ernest and Ivy lived at The Crest, Thrift Villas.  They had no children.  Ernest died in the 1940’s.

War service: Ernest's name was first noted in the Parish Magazine of October 1914 and again in April 1915 'now on active service'.  From July 1915 he served in France (Theatre of War) and then he was wounded in Egypt. His medal card stated he was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals.   No other service history can be found.

Brother John is noted below.
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John Charles (known as Charlie) BOULTON, Private / Lance Corporal
Service Nos. 3356 (Pte) & 325801 (Lance Corporal), Worcs Yeomanry/The Queen's Own
Worcs. Hussars/Corps of Hussars

Charlie was born 29 April 1895 in Hanbury, Worcs., the second son of John and Sarah.  (His elder brother Ernest is detailed above).  He lived with his family of 3 brothers and 2 sisters at Archbell Cottages, Hallow (1911 Census), and he was an errand boy for a house painter.  He enlisted aged 19 in 1916 to the Worcs. Yeomanry and served in Egypt, and Palestine where he was wounded in action 1917, and discharged.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  (For more information, click here.
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Albert BRITTON, Gunner
Killed in action 12th August 1917
Service No. 59794, Royal Garrison Artillery, 80th Siege Battery

Albert was born c 1887 in Bristol. He married Alice in 1909 and lived at 3 Millpond Street, Bristol. He was killed in action in France & Flanders 12th August 1917 whilst serving his gun (Western European Theatre). He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. His wife and 2 children had recently moved to live with his mother-in-law Mrs Hope of Elba Villa, Hallow Green, as he had expressed a desire to live in the country after the war. No further service record can be found.
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Samuel BROOKS, Private
Naval Police

It has not been possible to establish definitely that Samuel Brooks who appears in the Parish Magazine as 'Naval Police' once lived as a child with his sister on Hallow Green as a lodger of Ann Davis in 1891. There are no on-line records for Naval Police. If you are related to Samuel we should be pleased to hear from you.
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Tom (Thomas) BROOKS, Private
Service No. 46958, 115th Training Reserve Battalion, Worcs Rgt.

Tom was born c. 1895, son of Harry (a master tailor, who worked at home) and Harriet. Tom had 2 sisters, and the family lived at The Hollies, Hallow (Census 1911). Tom was an apprentice butcher. As his name is not recorded in the Parish Magazine before June 1918, it is possible that Tom did not enrol until that year. His medal card does not give any information other than he received the Victory and British War medals.
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Arthur Albert BROOM, Private
Killed in action 10th August 1915
Service No. 16991, 9th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Arthur was born in Musbury, Axminster 1895, son of William and Jessie who lived at Mountfield Cottage, Musbury, Axminster, Devon. Arthur was a fruit grower’s assistant. (Census 1911). His parents lived at The Laurels, 19 Hallow Road, Worcester.  At the time of his war service, Arthur lived in Worcester.  He entered the Balkan Theatre 22 June 1915 and was killed in action 10th August 1915 aged 20 at the Battle of Sari Bair, Gallipoli.  Arthur is commemorated on Helles Memorial, Turkey, Panel 104 to 113. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals. No service records can be found.  
Brothers Frederick and Henry are below.
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Frederick Benjamin BROOM, Private
Service Nos. 93069 / 26609, 156th Labour Corps./Duke of Cornwall's Lt Infantry / Labour Corps

Frederick was born c. 1897 in Axminster, Devon, son of William (a domestic gardener) and Jessie who lived at Church Hill, Axminster (Census 1901). He had 2 brothers and 1 sister. (The Electoral roll of 1918 recorded he lived at 2 Hallow Road.) No service record can be found other than his medal card which showed he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  Brother Albert is noted above, and Henry below.
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Henry William BROOM, Private
Died of wounds 18th August 1918
Service No 90733, 30th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps. Infantry

Henry was born in Axminster c. 1892 to William and Jessie who lived at Church Hill, Axminster. He had 2 brothers and 1 sister. (Census 1901). In the Census of 1911, he was single, and a domestic (boarder) at Wormington Grange, nr. Broadway, Worcs. and he worked as 3rd Gardener (6 in total). Henry enlisted in Hereford, and died of wounds 18th August 1918 aged 27, taking part in the Western European Theatre (formerly 7148, Herefordshire Rgt.) His parents were stated as living at the Gardens, Henwick Hall, Worcester. He is buried in Arneke British Cemetery, France, Grave III. E. 3. and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. (Click here for more information.)  Brothers Frederick and Albert are above.
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Arthur George BURROW, Private
Died of wounds 5th November 1916
Service Nos. 2840 & 39727, Worcs Yeomanry, 'W' Company 4th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Arthur was born in Martin Hussingtree, Worcs  in 1893, son of Arthur (a farm horse wagoner) and Mary Elizabeth.  Arthur had 2 brothers and 2 sisters (Census 1901). He was living at Farm Cottage, Fernhill Heath, Worcester when he enlisted. He died of his wounds aged 23 on 5th November 1916 (part of the Western European Theatre). His parents are stated as living at Park Farm Cottages, Hallow. He is buried in Bois Guillaume Communal Cemetery, France, Grave II. B. 9. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. (His name appears on the Roll of Honour in Claines St John the Baptist Church).
Brother William is shown below.
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William Charles BURROW, Private
Service Nos. 40825 & 50131, 1st Worcs Regiment / Oxford & Bucks Lt Infantry

William was born in Martin Hussingtree c. 1897, son of Arthur (a farm horse wagoner) and Mary. He had 2 brothers and 2 sisters. (Census 1901).  It's possible that William enlisted towards the end of the War, as his name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of April/May 1918 and the Absent voters list 1919. He lived in Camp Lane, Grimley. His medal card showed he received the Victory and British War medals. No other service record can be found.
Brother Arthur is noted above.
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George Trevor CARTLAND, 2nd Lieutenant - 1914/ Captain Adjutant – 1915
Killed in action 1st July 1916
1st Battalion Rifle Brigade

George was born c. 1893 (baptised 24 Feburary 1893) at All Saints Church, Kings Heath, Worcs. His parents were George (a barrister) and Lilian, and he had one sister. They lived at Hazelwell Hall, Kings Norton (Census 1901) and they had 5 servants. In the 1911 Census, George was an 18 year old student at Winchester College.  By Autumn 1919 his parents had moved to Bevere Cottage in Claines near Worcester.  On leaving Winchester he became a cadet at Sandhurst and passed out as the best all round student receiving the King's Sword and Gold Medal. He joined the Rifle Brigade and was posted with the British Expeditionary Forces on 23 August 1914. The Parish Magazine of April 1915 congratulated him on becoming Aide-de-Camp. George was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme (1st July 1916) aged 23. He is buried in Serre Road Cemetery No. 2, France, Grave III. E. 14. He was awarded the 1914 Star.
(Probate London 2 Dec 1916 to Lilian Cartland - effects £2966 17s 11d = 2013: app £260,000).  

As a Wykhamist more information is available here -  http://www.winchestercollegeatwar.com/archive/george-trevor-cartland/
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Richard CHAMBERLAIN, Private
Service No. 227762, R.E., Road Construction Co.

Richard was born c. 1865 in West Malvern.  His father, Richard was a labourer, his mother was Maria, and he had 4 brothers and sisters (Census 1871).  In 1891 he lived in Cradley with his wife Emily and three children and was employed as a labourer.  By 1911 he was living at Ashfield Cottage, Hallow and was now a lime kiln quarryman.  He was called up for service December 1916 aged 51.  He embarked with the British Expeditionary Forces February 1917, returning in July and was 'discharged no longer physically fit for War Services', September 1917.  Richard suffered from acute myalgia that gave him acute pain in his shoulders, elbows and hip joints.
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James CHANCE, Sapper
Service No. 15696, 55 Fd Coy, Royal Engineers

James, born c. 1887 in St Johns, Worcester, was the youngest son of Thomas (a nursery gardener) and Margaret. He had 3 sisters and 1 brother, and lived in Shoulton Road, Hallow (Census 1891). By the 1901 Census, James was the only sibling still living at home, and he was a blacksmith's labourer. James enlisted in September 1914. Unfortunately his service record has not been found, but his name appears on the Absent Voters list 1919, so he may still have been in active service then. His medal card showed that he was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory and British War medals, plus the Clasp and Roses. James died in December 1961, aged 74.
Brother Thomas is shown below.
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Thomas Joseph CHANCE, Quarter Master/ Staff Sergeant Major
Service No. S/15623, No. 1 Field Battery, Army Service Corps

Thomas, born c. 1881 in St Johns, Worcester,  was the eldest son of Thomas (a nursery gardener) and Margaret. He had 3 sisters and 1 brother, and lived in Shoulton Road, Hallow (Census 1891). In the 1901 Census, he was serving as a baker in the A.S.C., Cleaning Area, at the Aldershot Military Institution. Thomas enlisted August 1914.  His service record has not been found, but his medal card showed he was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory and British War medals, and the Clasp and Roses. He died in December 1941 aged 60.
Brother James is noted above.
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Lancelot Arthur CHERRY, Sub-Lieutenant
Killed in action 11th May 1915
Drake Battalion Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

Born 11th October 1883 at Henwick Hall, Worcester, the only son of Arthur Charles Cherry, Barrister atLlaw, and his wife Lucy Annora (nee Martin) Cherry of Henwick Hall Worcester. He was commissioned 1st October 1914, posted to Drake Battalion November 1914, and killed in action 11th May 1915, in Gallipoli, by a single bullet to the head. He is commemorated on Helles Memorial, Turkey, Panel 8 to 15.
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Thomas Walter CLARKE, Private
92nd Training Reserve

Thomas was the eldest son of Walter (a garden labourer) and Mary Ann. He was born in Grimley July 1899 and had 4 sisters and 1 brother.  They lived at Sinton Green, Grimley (Census 1901). By 1911 the family were living in Parkfield Lane, Hallow. He married Ellen Louisa Freeman c. during the period October-December 1924 and went on honeymoon to Australia, and did not return to the UK. They settled down and lived in Queensland. (Ellen aka Nelly lived to be 100 yrs old, but there is no record of when Thomas died). Thomas' name first appears in the Parish Magazine September 1917- this was probably when he enlisted. No service record or medal card can be found.  (For more information, click here)
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Cecil Alfred CLAY, Private
Service Nos. 3916 & 241268,   8th Worcs Regiment

Cecil was born in Hallow c. 1892, the son of Arthur (a painter) and Annie. The family lived at Cedar Cottage, Hallow Green and Cecil was a glove cutter (Census 1911). He enlisted c. March and on 22 February 1915 he was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct in action. The Absent Voters List of 1918 showed Cecil living in Hylton Road, Worcester. He was discharged due to wounds on 30 May 1919, and in October received the Silver Badge. His medal card showed he was also awarded the Victory and British War medals.  (For more information, click here.) 
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John Joseph Wall CLAY, 2nd Hand, Ord. Seaman
Service No. J72334, HMS Victory I / HMS Diadem (1917) / HMS Mersey (1918)

John was the eldest son of John Edwin (a painter & plumber) and Annie (nee Footman), and lived at Hallow Green (Census 1911). He was born 9 January 1894 at Little Witley, Worcs.  He had 1 brother and 1 sister. John was an apprentice painter. His name first apppeared in the Parish Magazine July/August 1917 serving on HMS Diadem, which was a Stoker’s Training ship.  John had enlisted on 19 June and was based at Portsmouth until 3 November 1917 as an ordinary seaman, when he appeared to have joined HMS Mersey which was in Zanzibar, and presumably was already on board an un-named ship. Confusingly he was still classed as being on board HMS Mersey when he was “on shore demob” on 21 July 1919. His Naval record indicated that he was paid the War Gratuity.
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Alfred COLE, Seaman/Reservist/Private/Bombardier/Gunner/ Sapper
Service Nos. 7915 / 3746 / WR 347284 / 598660,
Royal Navy / 3 Royal Welsh Fusiliers / 8 Worcs Rgt R.G.A./ 2nd Rgt Labour Corps, Res. Coy/ 112th Anti Aircraft Section/304th Labour Res. Coy/I.W. & D., R.E. Richborough / Labour Corp, Worcester.

Alfred was born in 1868, Merthyr Tydfil.  He married Sarah, and had 2 daughters (Martha & Mabel) and 2 sons (Alfred & Percy) - Census 1911. Another son (John) appears on the 1901 Census (1 month old), but doesn't appear in the next census.  Before the War, Alfred was a Class II reservist, 3 Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and his service records state that he had also been in the Royal Navy (this record has not been found). He was drafted in August 1914 at the age of 47 as Private, and was promoted to Bombardier in 1916, quickly being demoted due to being drunk on duty. He was made a gunner until August 1918 when he was transferred to Richborough as Sapper (Railway Driver), until his discharge in March 1921, due to acute rheumatism.  Before the War, Alfred was a Train Driver. He lived at many addresses including Merthyr Tydfil, Yarhampton, Astley, (Stourport), Worlds End (Grimley) and Ladygo Cottage (Hallow), Hylton Road (Worcester) and Pengam Garden Village, Mon.
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Archibald Thomas CORBETT, Private
Service Nos. 240244 / 15303, 8th Worcs Regiment / Royal Army Medical Corps

Archibald was born 1883 in Honeybourne, Glos. His parents were George (a labourer in an ironworks) and Fanny, and he had 3 sisters. They lived at Hawne Lane, Honeybourne (Census 1891). By 1901, his father had died, and Archibald was working as a shell tube cleaner, and Census 1911 stated he was now a tube welder. The family had moved to 154 Haven Hill, Old Hills, Staffs and all siblings were 'single'. No service record can be found, and his Medal Card stated he was awarded the Victory and British War medals. As his name appeared in the Parish Magazine of September 1914, he may have enlisted at that time, or have already been in the Army. The Parish Magazine of November 1917 stated that Archibald has been awarded the Military Medal for Gallant Conduct.
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Percy CORBETT, O. Tel (Telegraph Operator?)
Service No. J 78411, Royal Navy HMS Powerful, HMS Ganges, HMS Pembroke I, HMS Douglas / 8th Bttn Worcs Regt (Warwick)

Percy Thomas Corbett was born in Worcester 20 February 1900 and joined the Royal Navy for 12 years on 20 February 1918. Percy was a Boy on the former cruiser, the training ship HMS Powerful and later on HMS Ganges, where he qualified as a Telegraphist. After two months at HMS Pembroke I, the RN barracks at Chatham, Percy served on the new HMS Douglas, a Scot-class Destroyer Flotilla leader from August 1918 until the 13 August 1919. Percy was invalided out of the Navy on 23 October “Disease of Ears aggravated”. He was paid the War Gratuity. Percy was subject to Statutory re-enlistment in 8th Bttn Worcestershire Regiment to TRO Warwick until 21 November 1921.
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William COURSE, Sergeant
Service No. TT/02235, Army Veterinary Corps / D Battery, 242 Bde RFA

William was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of December 1916, maybe this was when he enrolled. Unfortunately the only record of him that can be found is his Medal Card, showing that he received the Victory and British War medals, and his name appeared on the Absent Voters List of 1918 stating his address as Spring Cottages, Hallow.

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Samuel Neville DALE, Captain
18th Royal Fusiliers/24th Reserve Brigade

Samuel was born in Cheltenham, Glos. c. 1883 to Henry John (a Music Seller) and Emmeline and they lived at Daisey Bank, Leckhampton with two 'live-in' servants, a cook and a housemaid. (Census 1891). He was the third of four sons. Samuel married on 24 April 1915, Mary Gordon (nee Salmon, born in Shipton, Yorkshire). She was the daughter of the late Rev. Gordon Salmon of Overton Vicarage and Mrs Salmon of The Laurels, Hallow. (No further records can be found of Samuel's service history or medal card.
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Albert DAVIES, 2nd Lieutenant
Killed in action 19th June 1917
Royal Flying Corps

Albert may have enrolled c. April 1917 as this is the date when his name first appeared in the Parish Magazine. The only record that can be found is notice of his death, killed in action 19th June 1917. Cannot trace any connection with Hallow other than his name appearing in the Parish Magazine.
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Joseph Rees DICKENS, Sapper
Royal Engineers

As Joseph's name appeared in the Parish Magazine of January 1916, he may have enlisted around this time. Limited records have been found - one showing a Joseph Rees Dickens, an apprentice mechanic, who lived at 79 Brooklyn St., Crewe, Cheshire. His father was a Locomotive Engine Driver for the L.N.W. Railway Co. There were 3 daughters, and Joseph was the only son (Census 1911). No service records can be found except for (1) SN 95438, Sapper, served in France from Aug 1915, and received the 1915 Star, Victory & British War medals, and (2) SN 158531 - Sapper, received the Victory & British War medals.
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Tom DICKENS, Private
Died in action
Service No. 17816 ??, Royal Flying Corps ?? Might be 6th Bttn Northants Rgt.

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine September 1916, in May 1919 it is reported Tom has died in action. The only record that can be found is a soldier (Private) from the Northamptonshire Rgt, 6th Bttn., who died of wounds in France & Flanders, Western European Theatre, 3 July 1916. His SN is 17816, and he was born in Rushden, Northants, where he also enlisted. He was born c. 1890, son of Charles (a Shoe Riveter) and Selina and had 3 brothers & 3 sisters.
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Harold George DOUGHTY, Gunner & Private
Service No. 572332, Royal Garrison Artillery/Labour Corp. 901 A.E. Coy

Harold was born in Hallow c. 1887 and the Census of 1901 showed him living at Hallow Green with his mother Harriet (an Elementary School Mistress), and grandmother Emma. By the time of the next Census (1911) Harold was a Grocer Shop Assistant, and living with his mother only. He enlisted December 1915, and gave his address as 25 Broad Street, Worcester, occupation Grocer. He had married to Phoebe Violet in June 1911   and they had one child. His records state he had 20% disability from the loss (amputation) of two fingers on his right hand and was treated at North General Hospital, Leicester (June 1919) and was discharged in August that year. He was given the Silver Badge, and awarded the British War medal. Harold died in the district of Pershore Dec. 1963, aged 76 yrs.
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Cyril Leslie DUTSON, Private
Service No. 133853, 92nd Training Reserve Batt. (Jan 1918) / 33rd Battery, Machine Gun Corps

Cyril was born in Hallow c. 1899  to Thomas Joseph Dutson, postman, and his wife Louisa (nee Stait) and lived in Church Lane, Hallow. He was the third of 4 children.   His father died in 1909.  He was called up for service April 26th 1917 to the 92nd Training Battalion. Then he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and saw action in Ypres and elsewhere in the Somme valley.  Most of his service record is missing, but what does exist states he was gassed (June 1917), and suffered pains in his chest and had cold night sweats. He was rated as having 'less than 20% disability' and 'effects of gassing and nerve trouble claimed but not discovered'. (October 1919). The Absent Voters List of 1919 stated he lived in Park Lane, Hallow. He married Alice Crane, a farmer's daughter from Shrawley, in 1931, and he died December 1952, aged 53. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  (For additional information, click here.) 
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Robert Redvers DUTSON,
Service Nos. 345 / (AVL 1916)  J54745 and (1919)  SS124898
HMS Impregnable, HMS Ramillies

Robert was born 6 October 1900, the 4th child of postman Thomas Joseph Dutson and his wife Louisa (nee Stait) who lived in Church Lane, Hallow.  His father died in 1909 which must have caused the family hardship as the Census of 1911 shows his mother working as a charwoman, and his eldest sister was a domestic servant.   Robert was living at the Royal Albert Orphanage, Henwick, Worcester, one of 20 boys aged 7-15.   He was accepted for 3 months basic naval training in 1916 for boys of 16 -18 on HMS Impregnable, then served towards the end of the war on HMS Ramilies.  He was awarded the Royal Fleet Reserve Long Service Medal (Service Year 1935-1952) Medal no. 17407. The Absent Voters List of 1918 showed him living at Park Lane, Hallow.   He married Florence Bishop in December 1926.   He joined the Hertfordshire Police.   For a brief time he became the licensee of the riverside pub, Camp House in Grimley in 1936.  In later life he lived with his wife and 4 children in 1 Cedar Cottages, Hallow and died in 1966.  (Click here for more information.) 
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Charles ESTALL, Private
Service No. T/4/040322, Army Service Corps

Charles enlisted January 1915 and was sent to train at Aldershot. Charles lived with his wife, Rachael and son John at Moseley Turning, Hallow. He was born c. 1888 at St Peters, Worcester, and he was almost 27  when he enlisted.  He worked as a farm wagoner. ( In 1911 he lived at Camp Cottages, Camp Lane, Hallow.) He was discharged after only 3 months as ‘unlikely to become an efficient soldier.’
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Albert Walter ETHERIDGE,
Service No. S2/SR 02973, Army Service Corps (Horse Transport)

Albert’s birth was registered in 1889, but when he enlisted on 20th February 1915 at the Guildhall Recruiting Office, he gave his age as 22.  Albert was a baker.  His father, William, was a bricklayers' labourer, and his mother was Harriet.  They lived at Elba Cottage, Hallow and he had 7 brothers.  Albert’s service included 1 year 9 months in France.  On December 17th, 1917, he was discharged 'no longer capable of active service', and was awarded in April 1920, the 1914/15 Star, the British War Medal and Victory Medal.
Brothers Arthur, Francis, Frederick, Henry, Maurice and Reginald are shown below.
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Arthur Thomas ETHERIDGE, Private / Corporal (1919)
Service No. S/6/064814, Army Service Corps/58th Field Bakery, Francean & as part of the Sinai and Palestine Campaign 1917.  11th Field Bakery (transf. after War)

Arthur 1891/2 - 1961 of Elba Cottage, Hallow was a baker when he enlisted, age 20, on February 22, 1915 at Worcester Guildhall, and was tested and approved as a third class baker.  He was discharged May 30, 1919 with aggravated otitis media (an ear infection). Arthur was classed as 60% disabled and granted a time limited allowance of 24s 0d per week.  He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British War Medal and Victory Medal.   Arthur married Beatrice Morgan in 1920.
His brothers, Albert (shown above) and  Francis, Frederick, Henry, Maurice and Reginald are below.
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Francis James ETHERIDGE,
Service No. M2/113636, Army Service Corps, Mechanical Transport

Born in 1886, the 1901 Census showed Frances living in Hallow with his father, William and mother, Harriet and 7 brothers aged between 2 and 19 yrs. In the Census of 1911, he was married to Lucy Beatrice and had a daughter Doris aged 2. His trade was a baker, and he was living at 29 Station Road, Northfield, Worcs. He enlisted 4 October 1915 and served in France. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals.

(Brothers Albert and Arthur are shown above, and Frederick, Henry, Maurice and Reginald below).
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Frederick William ETHERIDGE,
Service No. 353383, 1st Reserve Garrison Artillery, Worcs Regt. / 424 Ag. Co., Labour Corps.

Born in Hallow 1884, Frederick lived with parents William and Harriet and 7 brothers (Census 1901). He married Florence (nee Hopkins), and lived at the School Cottage. They had a daughter Eva Florence aged 3 months. (Census 1911) and he was a Rural Postman. No service records are available, but his name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of July 1917 and he was on the Absent Voters List of 1918.  He died December 1964 aged 81.
(Brothers Albert, Arthur and Francis are shown above, and Henry, Maurice and Reginald below).
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Henry Charles ETHERIDGE, 2nd Airman
Service No. G/86927, Royal Flying Corps / Royal Fusiliers

Henry was the eldest son of William (a bricklayer's labourer) and Harriet. (He had 7 brothers - 1901 Census). He was born c. 1882 in Hallow and in 1901 he worked as an assistant in a Printing Office. He married Lucy Worman in 1906, and died September 1953 at the age of 71.  His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of August 1915 and the Absent Voters List of 1918 said he lived in Poplar Row, Hallow. (Unfortunately no service or medal card records have been found).
Brothers Albert, Arthur, Francis and Frederick are shown above, and Maurice and Reginald below.
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Maurice Eveason ETHERIDGE, Private
Service No. S/357498, Army Service Corps / RASC

Maurice was born in 1896, another of the 8 Etheridge brothers. He was a baker when he enlisted June 13, 1917.  His initial medical examination revealed he had flat feet and VDH (Valvular Disease of Heart). Ten years before Maurice had Rheumatic Fever. On the 6 June 1919 he was classed as no longer physically fit for war service.  He married Mabel Lawrence in 1929.
(Brothers Albert, Arthur, Francis, Frederick and Henry are shown above, and Reginald below).
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Reginald Joseph ETHERIDGE, Private / Baker
Service Nos.  46564 /  643305/  7295017, Army Service Corps(1915)/Sth Staffs. Rgt(1917) /
281 A.E. Co.Labour Corps

Reginald was born in Hallow in 1899, his parents were William and Harriet, and he had 7 brothers.  He lived at Elba Cottage, Hallow and was a baker.  He was put on the Reserve list May 1916, and mobilized February 1917.  In September 1917 he was transferred to the South Staffs Rgt. and posted with the British Expeditionary Forces to France, in January 1918. In March he suffered gas poisoning leaving him with 10% disability, and was transferred home to the Labour Corps, returning to the Rhine July 1919, and dispatched to a Concentration Camp in Boulogne September 1919, with N.A.C.B., R.A.S.C.  He was demobbed November 1919.  He received the British War and Victory Medals in 1922.  Reginald died February 1955 aged 56 years.
(His brothers Albert, Arthur, Francis, Frederick, Henry and Maurice are shown above).
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Charles Archibald FIELD, Private / Lance Corporal
Service Nos. 2917 (Pte), 56668 (L.Corp) 340718 (MGC) & 118970 (Lab.Cor),
8th Worcs Regiment / Pioneer Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps / Machine Gun Corps & Labour Corps

Charles Archibald Field was born in 1898 in Hallow.  His parents were Harry and Caroline Anne (Annie) Field nee Cook, and he had a sister named Kathleen.  In 1901, their mother was a housemaid in the household of the Rev and Mrs. Edward Isaac at Hanley Castle, and Charles and  Kathleen were living with their uncle and aunt, Harvey and Eleanor Preece nee Cook and their two children in Hallow. By 1911 Charles was living in Marlborough St Mary and was shown as the stepson of James and Annie Robson. As his name appeared in the Parish Magazine September 1914, he may have enlisted at this time, but his medal card stated that he served from April 1915 as a Private, and was later promoted to Lance Corporal. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals. The Absent Voters List of 1919 stated that Charles lived in Camp Lane.
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Joseph FINCH (FINCHY), Private
Service Nos. 8323 / 414704 / 147133 & 8323, Kings Royal Rifle Corps,
Shropshire Light Infantry/ Labour Corps / RFC

Joseph was born in 1887 in Hallow, his father was William, a bricklayer, and his mother was Elizabeth. They had 6 surviving children at the time of the 1911 census.  Joseph had worked as a tailor for 5 years for Harry Brooks. He attested as a Reservist on 1 January 1907 and later gave his mother Elizabeth, of 3 Croydon Villas, Comer Gardens as his next of kin.  Joseph is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine in 1914. His surviving service record was created when he transferred to the RFC/RAF. Information seems to have been transferred across and the original record no longer survives. Joseph saw service in France from 9 September 1914 to 18 January 1919.  Firstly with the Kings Shropshire Light Infantry - possibly with the 1st Battalion. His medical record shows that he was in poor health from October to December 1915 / 25 October 1915 to 5 November 1915 3 Canadian General Hospital at Camiers / 8 November 1915 admitted to the Isolation Hospital at Etaples – Typhoid - for six days. / 2 December admitted to another hospital at Etaples for nine days with a bout of influenza. He was later a labourer in the Labour Corps (transferred on 15 October 1917) and subsequently was a Private (labourer) in the RFC (from 15 March 1918), before transferring to the new RAF on 1 April 1918. Later he was re-classed from Private to Aircraft Hand.  Joseph was medically examined on 22 February 1919 and classed as ‘BII’. He was finally discharged 30 April 1920.  He was awarded the 1914 Star and the British Victory medal.  (Brother Thomas is shown below, as well as his father Leonard).
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Thomas Henry FINCH, Private
Service No. 103952, 8th Worcs Regiment / 174 Labour Corps.

Thomas lived in Greenhill Terrace, Hallow and was married. He enlisted 26 October 1914 and was posted to the Somme in June 1915. In January 1917 he was transferred to a Devon Regt, possibly for medical assessment, and then transferred again to 9th Inf. Labour Corps, and yet again in May to 174 Labour Coy. (April 1917, he was 'deprived of 3 day’s pay for quitting camp when placed in isolation for Scabies' ). He was discharged in February 1918, suffering with shell shock, having been treated (date unknown) at 4th London General Hospital. His character was noted as 'very good' He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
Brother Joseph is shown above, and brother Reginald below, along with their father Leonard also noted below).
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Reginald William FINCH, 3rd Air Mechanic
Service No. 292171, Royal Air Force

Reginald William Finch was born on 8 August 1900 and died in 1976. He was the son of Leonard and Ellen Finch nee Mountford of Poplar Row, Hallow. They had eight children and Reginald was the eldest. Both Reginald and his father served in WWI. Reginald enlisted on 5 September 1918 into the RAF and gave his occupation as “Deliverer of Yeast”.  He became part of an RAF Rigger Crew, a position which he held at the end of WWI. His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of January 1919.  Reginald’s Service record is very detailed, but full of abbreviations that are difficult to understand.  Having been a Rigger he was re-mustered in January 1919 as an Aircraft Mechanic 2 and in February 1919, when he was discharged, he was a “Rigger Aero” as “AC2”. In November 1919 he was based in Egypt. The words “Census 31st Jan 1920, are stamped in the time-line of the various bases at which Reginald served, so future researchers will know not to look for him at home on that census! Reginald enlisted in the RAF in 1937 as AC 2.
Brothers Joseph and Thomas are shown above, and father Leonard is below.
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Leonard James FINCH, Private / Lance Corporal
Service Nos. 20901, TR/9/281482, 51378 & 171722, Worcs Regiment/ Worcs 46th Training Res. Btn /Devonshire Rgt/ 310 Works Co., Labour Corps.

Leonard Finch 1879 – 1949 was the eldest son of William Finch, a bricklayer, and his wife Elizabeth. He married Ellen Jessie Mountford in 1899.  They had 3 sons & 3 daughters (Census 1911) and lived at Poplar Row, Hallow. Two more children were born....... Leonard was a bricklayer who had worked for six years for Joseph Thorpe, in Hallow, when he enlisted in January 1915.  He had some medical problems which meant that he was not classified as AI.  (Classification varied from CIII to BI, the latter being for flat feet.)  He joined the 12th (2nd) Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment as a Private on 15 November 1915 at Fowey, Cornwall. He was appointed unpaid Lance Corporal with the 12th on 10 July 1916 and was posted as paid Lance Corporal to the 46th Training Reserve Battalion (aka 13th Bttn Worcs Regt). In 1917 Leonard was posted to the First Infantry Works Battalion, the Devonshire Regiment and later transferred on 28 April 1917 to Royal Engineers 310th HS Works Company, Tidworth.  There are just four charges on his Conduct Sheet – Absent from Parade; overstaying his pass; absent from work/not complying with Order, and neglecting his work. The punishments varied from ‘confined to barracks’ to ‘severely reprimanded’. Leonard was transferred to Class Z Reserve on demobilisation on 4 September 1919.
(Sons Reginald, Joseph and Charles are shown above).
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Richard Thomas FLETCHER,
Service No. 28264, C Co., Royal Welsh or Warwickshire

Richard was born in Hallow 1901, his father Thomas was a farm labourer, his mother was named Kate, and he had a sister (Census 1901). They lived at Brook Cottage, Moseley. In the Census of 1911 the family had grown to 2 sons, and 2 daughters, living at the same address.  No service or medal records can be found, but as his name was listed in the Parish Magazine of December 1918, he probably enlisted about this time. His name was also on the Absent Voters List for 1919. In May 1920 he was recorded as working as an engine cleaner for the Great Western Railway, Worcester, Fireman (Stourbridge) 1930, and Driver in 1933. This record stops in August 1956. Richard died in September 1969 aged 69 (registered in the Stourbridge district).

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Charles FREEMAN, Private
Service Nos. 203437 & 224589, Worcs Regt. / Labour Corps


Charles was born in Hallow c. 1889, son of George and Annie. He had one sister (Census 1891) and the family lived in Partridge Lane, Hallow. Charles' father was a farm labourer. His service record cannot be found, his medal card shows that he received the Victory and British War medals. 

At the time of the Electoral Roll of 1918 he lived at Parkfield Cottages, Hallow.

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George Henry FREEMAN, Acting Staff Sgt Major
Died 15th July 1915
Service No. S2/SR/01451, 259th Depot Unit, Supply Army Service Corps.
(1st New Army, Woolwich Dockyard)

George was born in Hallow, son of George (a labourer and later a florist/gardener) and mother Elizabeth.  He lived with his parents and sister at 1 Oldbury Road, Worcester (Census 1891).  In 1901, he had a brother as well, aged 7 yrs, and George was a 'Pupil Teacher'.  The 1911 Census recorded him living at 52 Lindsay Street, Stalybridge, boarding with Thomas and Catherine Scriven and their 3 children.  George was now a Police Constable, but also recorded in his service record as an Inspector of Weights & Measures.    He married Elizabeth (nee Kitson) 26 April 1915, and they lived at 222 Mottram Road, Stalybridge.   As a Special Reservist he enlisted 7 October 1914 in Manchester aged 30.  George died at Gallipoli 15th July 1915 aged 31 (the cause of death on his record sheet is given as 'Syncope'. (This condition is not sufficient to cause death, unless it is linked to a possible cardiovascular condition.) George is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Turkey, Grave A.47. He was awarded posthumously the 1915/15 Star, Victory and British War medals.
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Thomas Henry FREEMAN, 1st class AB Stoker
Died 12th November 1914
Service No. K/8956, HMS New Zealand

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine of September 1914, Albert drowned, aged 21, on 12th November 1914 after accidentally falling overboard whilst trying to get into the picket boat. It was dark and by the time a searchlight was found, he was lost. He was the son of Charles Freeman, 4 Star Yard, Bransford Road, St. John's, also noted in Parish Magazine, as 19 Lechmere Crescent. From CWGC, remembered on Panel 3 Plymouth Naval Memorial.
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Frederick FREEMAN, Gunner
Killed in action 18th August 1917
Service No. 831059, 80th Siege Battery, 241st Brigade, Royal Horse & Field Artillery

Frederick was the youngest son of Charles and Elizabeth. He was born in Hallow c. 1897 and lived in Bell Lane with his 2 brothers and 3 sisters. The Parish Magazine of March 1915 reported Frederick 'as joining active service'. He was killed in action in France & Flanders as part of the Western European Theatre, 18th August 1917, aged 20, and is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium. Grave VII.C.18 (His father lived in 4 Star Yard, Bransford Road, St. John's - also Lechmere Crescent was noted in the Parish Magazine).
(Brother Thomas is shown below).
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Thomas John FREEMAN, Gunner
Service No. 19173, Royal Field Artillery

The Census of 1901 showed Thomas lived in Bell Lane, Hallow with his parents Charles (a Gas Stoker), mother Elizabeth, and 2 brothers, and 3 sisters. Thomas was born in Hallow c. 1892. Thomas enlisted at the end of 1914, and was sent to France in July 1915. The Parish Magazine of April 1915 reported Thomas as 'being in active service', and was later stated as having gunshot wounds, in hospital in Southampton.  He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory & British War medals. (No other service history has been found).  Brother Frederick is shown above.
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Herbert GARDINER, Private
Service Nos. H/34680 & D/33636, 5th Reserve Cavalry / 14th Hussars Corps of Dragoons
& 1st Dragoon Guards.

Herbert was born in Hallow in 1894 to William (a farmer) and Ann Elizabeth Gardiner. He had 2 brothers and 2 sisters, and the family lived at Headway Farm, Shoulton, Hallow (Census 1911). Herbert enlisted on 23 February 1916 at Worcester and gave his occupation as a stockman.  Some information about his previous service can be found in the Royal Tank Corps 1919-1946 records which are on-line. The remainder is information taken from the Parish Magazine.  Herbert was serving with the 14th Hussars/1st Dragoon Guards in India on 2 July 1917. He was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine for Intercessory Prayers in 1918. He transferred to the Royal Tank Corps on 2 March 1919. Unfortunately the abbreviation concerning where he served with them is smudged, but someone with knowledge about the Royal Tank Corps may be able to read it.  His record confirmed that he was wounded on 6 May 1919 and the Parish Magazine gave the details that’ he sustained a flesh wound to his thigh whilst fighting in Afghanistan, and recovered well’. His medal card stated he was awarded the British War medal, and he also appeared on the Absent Voters List 1918.
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Henry James GEORGE, Bombardier
Service No.110490, Royal Garrison Artillery

Henry was born in Birmingham (12 Hawthorn Grove, Whitmore Road, Aston) c. 1898, and in the Census of 1911 he was shown as living in Parkfield Lane, Hallow. His parents were Albert ((a Wood Carver) and Annie, and he had a sister, Marian. As Henry's name appeared in the Parish Magazine of December 1916, he may have enlisted about this time, but unfortunately there are no service records. His medal card showed that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals. No other records have been found.
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Albert Edward GILLETT, American Force

Albert Edward Gillett was born in 1884, son of Edward and Clara Gillett nee Rowe, who had seven children.  In 1901 some of the family were living on The Green and Albert was working as a Printer’s Compositor. He emigrated to the USA in 1909 and on 25 June 1911 he married Harriett Townsend, from England, in Revere, Massachusetts.  A draft registration card was completed on September 12 1918, although the date of his birth is incorrect, which is puzzling.  He and Harriett lived at 873 Winthrop Avenue, Revere, Suffolk County Massachusetts. Albert's name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of May 1919, Details of his US war-time service have not yet come to light. Can you help?

The 1920 and 1930 American census showed that Albert and Harriett had two children and were still living in Revere. By 1930 Albert was an Elevator Man in a Trust building. No further information has been found.
(Brothers Charles, and Harry are shown below, as well as twin brother Francis).
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Charles William GILLETT, Armourer's Crew
Service No. M29565, Royal Navy.

Charles was born in Hallow 12 September 1896 to Edward (a boot/shoemaker) and Clara. In the Census of 1911, there were three sons and one daughter living at Hallow Green. Charles was a watch repairer by trade, when he enlisted in the Royal Navy on 19 February 1918.  Charles' name first appeared in the Parish Magazine April/May 1918.  Charles was attached to the shore base Pembroke II at Chatham, so it is not known which ship he was serving on.  He was demobbed on 19 February 1919. His service record showed that he was awarded the British War medal. (There is a death record of a man of the same name June 1981, age 84 yrs. Registration district Birmingham.)  Brother Albert is shown above, and brothers Francis and Harry are below.
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Francis John GILLETT, Leading Seaman
Died 12th March 1917
Service No. PO/210748, Royal Navy Flying Corps (1915), HMS Renown/ HMS Victory
(Naval Casualties database says Francis is a Leading Seaman)

Francis was the twin brother of Albert, born July 23 1884 in Hallow, eldest sons of Edward (a shoemaker) and Clara. Francis joined active service September 1914.  At the time of the Census of 1911, Francis 'was on board - China and East Indies - vessels'. He was reported 'having died 12th March 1917 aged 32 (after an operation) in the Royal Navy Hospital, Haslar, Gosport.'  He was in the Royal Navy for 16 ½ years, inc. 2 ½ years in the Naval Flying Station at Felixstowe. (He was wrecked in HMS Bedford at the China Station, and was on board HMS Ariel when that vessel rammed the German submarine U12 in the North Sea). He was buried on March 16th in St Philip and St James churchyard, Hallow, north of church tower' and was awarded The Star, British Medal and Victory Medal posthumously.
Twin brother Albert is noted above, as well as his other brother, Charles and Harry below.
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Harry George GILLETT, Gunner
Service Nos. 3706 & 831423, Royal Field Artillery / D/5 A Bde, RFA

Harry George Gillett was born in 1889 and in 1911 (census) he was a clerk in an iron works.  He lived with his parents and some of his siblings at Hallow Green.  Harry was one of the seven children of Edward and Clara Gillett nee Rowe. On 26 October 1915 he volunteered for the Territorial Force, and as such was liable to serve in the event of a national emergency.  He was initially posted to the 30th Brigade. Harry was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine Intercessory Prayers in November 1915, and again in January 1916 when it was reported that he had shell wounds and was in hospital at Trouville.  (For more information click here)
Brothers Albert, Francis, and Charles are shown above.
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Albert GOODWIN, Private
Killed in action 12th October 1916
Service No. 27407, 5th/11th Worcs Regiment

Albert was born in St John's, Worcester c. 1890 and his parents were Thomas (a farm labourer) and Louisa. In 1901, he had one sister, and the family lived in Moseley Road, Hallow. In the 1911 Census, Albert was a farm labourer like his father.  His name was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of March 1916 so he may have enlisted around that time, and in December 1916 he was reported as missing, presumed dead. His name appears on the memorial as being of the Royal Field Artillery but it is more likely to be 11th Battalion Worcs. Regt. He was recorded as 'killed in action, Salonika, 12th October 1916' - part of the Balkan Theatre. He was buried in the regional unit of Kilkis, Central Macedonia, Greece. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
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George William GREEN, Gunner
Service nos. 74698 (H Battery RHA) / 201371,  7th Bde. Royal Horse Artillery - Anti Aircraft Section, Mesopotamia S /Royal Garrison Artillery

George was born c. 1878 in Broadheath, son of George (an agricultural labourer) and Mary.  The two census of 1891 and 1901 show the family lived at Peachley Old House Farm, Broadheath.   George married Kate Checketts, and the 1911 Census recorded them and their children, Thomas 7, Ethel 4 and Alice 6 months at School Cottage, Hallow.  George was a gardener nurseryman.  His medal card stated that his service began 15 August 1914 and he transferred from the RHA to the RGA in March 1918.   He is noted on the Absent Voters List of 1918. He was awarded the Clasp and Roses, which is given to those who had operated within range of enemy mobile artillery between August and November 1914.
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Albert GRIFFITHS, Royal Field Artillery
(There are six soldiers of this name, all serving in France in 1915)

As Albert's name appeared in the Parish Magazine of March 1915 and there are no Census records of him in the Hallow or Worcester area, it is impossible to know who he is. There are six soldiers, (1) SN 512 & 725046, Sergeant, France 22.11.15 (2) SN 720 & 730083 Driver, Bombardier & Corporal, France 21.11.15 (3) SN 1091 & 690142 Gunner & Bombardier, France 28.09.15 (4) SN 4366 Gunner, France 23.08.15 (5) SN 5401 Driver, France 24.12.15 (6) 74066 Bombardier, France 14.06.15 - all soldiers were awarded the Victory, British War medals and the 1915 Star.
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Alfred GRIFFITHS, Private
Service Nos. 46068 / 415312 / GS/110858, 6th Worcs Rgt /
Labour Corps / Royal Fusiliers / 913 Emplo. Co. MGC

Alfred was born in Worcester c. 1874, and in 1881 he was living with his widowed mother, Mary Ann, a gloveress. There were three sons, including Alfred, and they lived at Shoulton Turn, Hallow.  By the Census of 1901, Alfred was the only sibling living with his mother, now a laundress, and Alfred was a labourer at a Vinegar Works. No service record can be found but Alfred was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of November 1917 so he may have enlisted around that time. His medal card showed that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals, and his name also appeared on the Absent Voters List for 1918.
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Gilbert GRIFFITHS, Royal Field Artillery

Recorded in the Parish Magazine, but unable to find any other records, either Census or military.
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Herbert William GRIFFITHS, Gunner
Service No. 865091, 2nd Royal Field Ammunition Corps

Herbert was born in 1890,  son of James and Jane Griffiths and he lived at Rose Cottage, Moseley Road, Hallow.  He enlisted November 1914.  By 1918, his address was 26 Bromyard Terrace, St Johns, Worcester.  During 1916 & 1917 he had many health problems - he had a chest injury whilst driving in April 1917 and was gassed in September 1918. He was demobbed September 1918 and was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory & British War medals.
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Thomas aka Tom GRIFFITHS
Service No. 347, HMS Impregnable (1916) HMS Ramilles (1917)

Tom was born in Claines, Worcester c. 1901 and his parents were George and Elizabeth. George was an engine driver at a Vinegar Works. Apart from Tom there was another brother and sister (Census 1911) and the family lived in Greenhill Terrace, Hallow. Tom's name is mentioned in the Parish Magazine of May 1916, so he probably enlisted around this time. A later electoral roll showed that Tom lived at Hallow Green. (No other records have been found)
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William Edward GRIFFITHS,
Service No. 8608, 2nd/6th Worcs Regiment

William was born in Worcester, 1891. His parents William (a general labourer) and Fanny had five sons including William who was a wood working machinist at the Albion Boxworks (Census 1911).  They lived at 59 Hylton Road, Worcester. William enlisted 12 August 1914, and it was recorded in the April 1915 edition of the Parish Magazine that William was 'now in active service'. His medal card showed that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals, and the 1914 Star and Clasp & Roses I.V. He was also awarded the Military Medal for bravery in action. No other record has been found.
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Thomas Henry GROSVENOR, Gunner or Driver
Royal Garrison Artillery, BMEF Salonica Force

Thomas was born in Grimley in 1886. His father Charles was a general labourer, his mother was Mary and they had nine children.  In 1891 they lived at Heath Farm House and by 1901 they were living in Parkfield Lane, where Charles was a working gardener.  Only three children were living with their parents, one being Thomas, aged 15. By the Census of 1911, Thomas, a packer of brushes, was married to Alice nee James, and they had two daughters and lived at 108 Bransford Road, St John's, Worcester. Thomas was living with his wife and two daughters at 5 Boughton Street, St Johns, Worcester when he attested at the age of 39 on 11 December 1915. He was in the Army Reserve until he was mobilised on 5 June 1916 and was posted as a Gunner to the Royal Garrison Artillery No. 3 Depot which was at Plymouth. A month later he was posted to 36 Company, also at Plymouth, where it was part of the South Western Coast Defences. On 18 December 1916 Thomas joined the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  Unfortunately the abbreviation for the company he was with from 6 January 1917 until 24 November 1918 is hard to read, but from the Parish Magazine for August 1917 we know that he was in Salonika. His next posting just after the end of the War, was back to the UK with  No 2 Depot (Heavy and Siege) at Gosport and four days later on 29 November 1918 he was with 2nd Reserve Battery (Siege) at Catterick. Thomas suffered from DAH (Disordered Action of the Heart) and when he was discharged from the service in March 1919 the Medical Board deemed that his condition had been aggravated 40% by his service. That page of his Army record is damaged but he may have received 11s a week as a pension. He was granted a 52 week bonus allowance of 4s 8d for his two children which was effective from 14 April 1919. Thomas was awarded the War Badge, British War and Victory Medals and died in 1974 aged 88.
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Frederick Thomas HAINES,
Service No. 434, Australian Contingent 6th Bttn, transferred to 58th Bttn

Frederick was born near Rugeley, Warwickshire and was a farm labourer before the war started.  He married Anna Louisa Clay, from Hallow Green at Hallow Church on 20 April 1917. We do not know how the two met. (Her brother Cecil was in the 8th Worcs Regt and was awarded the Military Medal in 1917. Her other brother was John Joseph Watt Clay who served in the Royal Navy.)  Frederick left England on 20 October 1918 suffering from Neurasthenia.  He was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and Victory Medal.
and was discharged on 13 March 1919 as medically unfit.  (For the full research on Frederick, click here)
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Henry (Harry) HANCOX, AB Seaman            
Service No. J 29756, HMS Impregnable (1914), HMS Revenge (1916), HMS Dublin (1918)

Henry, or Harry as he was known, was born on 28 March 1898 at Holt, although on census returns his place of birth was shown as Hallow. His parents were Charles (a builder’s labourer) and Rose(anne) Hancox nee South. Harry was an errand boy on the 1911 census and lived with six of his seven brothers and sisters and parents in Greenhill Terrace, Hallow.  Harry joined the Navy as a “boy” in March 1914. He was 5ft 1 ¾ ins tall with dark brown hair and slate coloured eyes. He trained at the land base HMS Impregnable and a mixture of land bases and ships are shown on his naval record.  As reported in the parish Magazine in late October 1916 Harry was on board HMS Revenge, which served as the flagship of the Flying Squadron which bombarded the coast of Flanders. More ships and land bases followed and the Parish Magazine next mentioned Harry on board HMS Dublin. He joined the ship on 28 March 1918 as an Able Seaman.  HMS Dublin was in the 2nd Light Cruiser Squadron which was part of the Grand Fleet until 1919 and was then part of the 6th Squadron at the Africa Station. It was whilst Harry was serving with HMS Dublin that he was awarded the War Gratuity. He continued to serve in the Royal Navy and transferred to the R A N on 28 March 1924.
Brothers William and John are noted below.
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William HANCOX, Welsh Fusiliers

William was the son of Charles (a builder's labourer) and Rose Hancox who lived in Greenhill Terrace, Hallow (Census 1911). There were five sons including William, and two daughters at home. William was born in Hallow c. 1896 and was a builder's labourer.  He was mentioned in the Parish Magazine September 1914 so may have enlisted about that time but no other records of his service have been found.
Brother Harry is shown above, and John, below.
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John James HANCOX, Corporal
Killed in action 9th April 1917
Service No. 123521, 73rd Battalion Canadian Infantry / Quebec Rgt (from Canadian websites)

John was born 1893 in Walsall, Staffordshire, and enlisted September 1915 in Canada.  His occupation was given as gear cutter.  He was another son of Charles and Rose Hancox, their address being given as Poseymans Cottage, Hallow.  John was killed aged 24 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917 and is remembered on the Vimy Memorial,
(See also Canadian Great War Project web site).
Brothers Harry and William are shown above.
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William Harry HANDLEY, Private / Lance Corporal
Service No. 204275, 2nd/7th Worcs Regt

William was born 11 November 1898 in Selly Oak, Birmingham, and when he enlisted in June 1917, he  was living with his parents Henry & Emily at Hallow Mill.  William was a bookbinder.  In July 1918, he was appointed Lance Corporal, and in August 1918 he qualified as 1st Class Assistant Instructor of the 55th Bombing Course, Otley.   While in Belgium, he sustained mustard gas blisters over his back and shoulder, April 1918 and was treated in a hospital at St Omer, France, and Edmonton Military Hospital, London.  His disability level was graded as 20%.  William was demobbed in March 1919 and was awarded the British War & Victory medals.
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Frederick George HARRIS, Private/Corporal/Temp. Sgt/Sergeant
Service Nos. 7462 / 512 / 534641 / 242432, 2nd/5th Norfolk Regiment/ 512 Labour Corps

Frederick enlisted 18 November 1915 at Gloucester.  Born 1891, he was 24 yr & 9 mth old and gave his occupation as Clerk, and his address as York House, The Moors, Worcester.  He had married Ethel May Thomas in August 1915 at St George's Church, Worcester. He was posted abroad August 1916 as part of the Northern Command. He was promoted to Lance Corporal January 1919, Corporal in June, and Sergeant in October the same year. In February 1920 he was transferred to the Labour Corps, disabled by Cardiac and Asthmatic problems and was demobbed later that month. (His connection to Hallow is not known)
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Alfred Archibald HAWKER, aka LANE, Private/Lance Corporal
Service Nos. 3259 /15737 / 108807/ 74750, 18th Service Bttn Lancs Fusiliers /Notts & Derbyshire Rgt, later Sherwood Foresters / 4th Worcs Rgt

Alfred Archibald Hawker was born in Kidderminster on 7 July 1898 with the surname Lane. This information did not come to light until after Alfred had married Elizabeth Sarah Dixon at St Stephens CE church in Worcester on 21 April 1919 and he re-enlisted from the Sherwood Foresters to the 4th Bttn Worcestershire Regiment in the Autumn of the same year. Evidence was provided  by December 1919 as to his correct name, his marriage certificate in the name of Lane was submitted, and his last civilian employer, Mr J H Hardman a Carting Agent from Lowesmoor in Worcester was able to confirm that he had known him by both names!  It is difficult to read the writing on his attestation paper on 7 January 1915, but it looks like Alfred lived at  “Berryhen Town Cottage”. This is most likely to be Buryend Town Cottage in Grimley parish. When Alfred enlisted he claimed to be a 19 year old wagoner but he was 16 years old. He joined the Lancashire Fusiliers and was then transferred to the Notts & Derbyshire Regiment. (He was known as Alfred Hawker to both regiments) He was posted to the BEF from 24 February 1916 with the 10th Lancashire Fusiliers. It is not clear when he returned to the UK but he was at Knowesley Park on 5 December 1917. He was posted again to the BEF on  31 March 1918 on the 3 April transferred to the Notts & Derby Regt. Alfred was made up to Lance Corporal  a few days later and then on 27 May he was reported missing, a Prisoner of War. There is no further information on this.  Alfred was posted home – repatriated on 11 December 1918. Discharged 18 Sept 1919 and re-enlisted as note earlier to the 4th Bttn Worcestershire Regiment, when he gave his home address as 4 Pound Cottage, Hallow Green. Alfred was demobbed 21 January 1920 by which time the family had moved to 2 Melbourne Street, Barbourne, Worcester.  Alfred’s file indicates that he had gunshot wounds to his back and thighs and was granted a 20% disability conditional award of 8s a week from 29 Jan 1920 to 9 Nov 1920. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals
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Richard William HAWKER, Sapper
Service No. 182416, Royal Engineers Wireless

The Parish Magazine noted Richard's name in July/August 1918, and on the Absent Voters List of 1918 his address was given as 189 Henwick Road, Worcester. It's possible that Richard did not enlist until late 1918 - his medal card showed he was awarded the Victory and British War medals. There is a man of the same name detailed in the Kelly's Directory for 1921, at the Bear & Ragged Staff Public house. No other information found.
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Archibald (Archie) HAYWARD, Driver
Service Nos. 2221 & 836049, Royal Field Artillery

Archibald aka Archie was born in Worcester c. 1891.  He was the son of Mary, a widow, and had 3 brothers, and 2 sisters. They lived in Wellington Court, Worcester. It is possible that he enlisted around November 1915 as this is when his name first appeared in the Parish Magazine. His medal card recorded he was awarded the Victory & British War medals.  His connection to Hallow is not known.
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William HERMAN, Private
Service No. 523535, 36th Training Reserve, Australian Imperial Force / 385 Co. Lab.Corps

William was mentioned in the Parish Magazine of April/May 1918 and was also on the Absent Voters List of 1918.  The Service number is not on the British Army Medal Index.  William lived at Hallow Green. Worth a look 
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Earl(e) Foster HEWITT, Lance Corporal
Service No. 20126, 5th/11th Worcs Regiment

Earl Foster Hewitt was born in 1891 in the Birmingham area. He was one of the three Hewitt stepsons of Arthur and Emily Sampson who lived at Archbell Cottage, Hallow. In 1911 Earl was employed as a roadworker for the Rural District Council.  He married Mary Westbury at Hallow church on 7 December 1913 and their daughter Hilda was born in September 1914. It is thought that they had four more children after the War.  In 1917 Earl was awarded a Silver War Badge and the transcription of the Silver War Badge Roll provides brief details of his military service. He enlisted on 14 December 1914 and became a Lance Corporal in the Worcestershire Regiment serving overseas. He was honourably discharged because of illness on 21 July 1916 and awarded Silver Badge 55852 on 8 February 1917. The Silver Badge is circular and has at its centre the King George cipher with the words “+ For King and Empire + Services Rendered” around the edge.  A few more details have been obtained from the part of his Army record that has survived.  Earl attested on 14 December 1914, and was a miller by trade.  On 6 January 1915 he was posted to the 5th Bttn (Reserve) Worcestershire Regiment who were stationed in Plymouth, and his wife moved into lodgings nearby.  Earl was promoted to Paid Lance Corporal on 21 October 1915. When he was discharged he stated that he intended to live at World’s End, Grimley.  In the 1927 London Gazette, he was noted as 'Appointed PO - Night Telephonist and Call Office attendant, Worcester'. Earl's Probate Index recorded his death 14 January 1950, aged 58. His widow, Mary lived at 61 Welland Lodge Road, Cleevemont Estate, Cheltenham. He also included in his will, James Samuel Clark, telephone supervisor.
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Harry Thomas HEWITT, Private
Service No. 11110, Royal Army Medical Corps

Harry was born in 1894 and baptised at Ashted Warwickshire. He was one of the three Hewitt stepsons of Arthur and Emily Sampson who lived at Archbell Cottage, Hallow.  At the time of the 1911 census they had living with them one of their daughters, Emily and Earle Hewitt, and Harry was working as a farm labourer). His record card shows he was awarded the 1914/15 Star, Victory, British War medals and he served in Egypt before December 1915.
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James HILL, Private
Killed in action 24th April 1917
Service Nos. 4236 & 241360, 1st/8th Battalion Worcs Regiment

James was the son of George (a labourer) and Emily who lived at Moseley Turning, Hallow (Census 1911). They had four daughters, two sons and one stepson, Thomas Beard. James was born in Hallow c. 1897 and was a farm labourer like his father. James' name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of September 1915 so he may have enrolled about that time. He was killed in action 24th April 1917 aged 20, and is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, France, Pier and Face 5A and 6C.
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Charles HINES,
Service No. 36327, Royal Garrison Artillery or RAMC ?

Charles was born in Cookley, Kidderminster c. 1880, and lived at Victor Road, Winson Green, Birmingham. He enlisted in Birminham on 22nd September 1914. Although the Parish Magazine of September 1914 noted a George Hines, we cannot find anyone of this name coming from the Hallow district. Charles Henry was discharged in October 1914 as being unfit for service. He was married to Florence Digger of St Martins, Worcester in June 1897 and they had six children.
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William Edmund HODGKINSON, Sergeant Major/Lieu.Qtr. Master
3rd Worcs Regiment

William was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of December 1916. He was awarded The Military Cross, D.C.M. (South African War), MC (Medaille Militaire), Good Conduct and Long Service Medals, and L.H.F prisoner
See Worcs Rgt website 
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Arthur John HOLLOWAY, Gunner / Sapper
Service No. 47979, Royal Field Artillery

Arthur was born in Worcester c. 1892 to Francis (a gardener) and Hannah. They had two sons and three daughters, and lived at Henwick House Cottage. Arthur was an engine cleaner and examiner for the Midlands Railway Co. (Census 1911). His name was first seen in the Parish Magazine of April 1915 so he may have enlisted about that time. His service card showed he was awarded the Victory & British War medals and the 1915 Star for service in France from 21 July 1915. He died September 1975 aged 83.
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Hubert Joseph HOOPER, Private
Killed in action 11th July 1916
Service No. 21075, 10th Battalion, South Wales Borderers

Born in Hallow c. 1882, Hubert enlisted in Ebbw Vale, Mon. and was sent to war December 1915 and died 11 July 1916, killed in action - France & Flanders, Western European Theatre. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals. No other information can be found.
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Horace William HOULDEY, AB Seaman & AB Stoker 1st Class
Service No. J91896, HMS Glorious

Horace was born 17 October 1900 in Worcester and the 1911 Census showed he was living with his grandparents, Charles and Jane of 90 Oldbury Road, Worcester.  He joined the Royal Navy 31 July 1918 and was trained whilst attached to HMS Powerful until 10 November 1918.  At the end of the war, he was transferred as a seaman to HMS Glorious, a Courageous class battle cruiser which had seen service patrolling the North Sea.  In the previous November it had been involved in the Second Battle of Heligoland.  Horace was subsequently attached to the shore-based establishment HMS Vivid I and from there transferred as an A/Stoke First Class in March 1919.   Although Horace had enlisted for 12 years, his record showed he left the Service 27 March 1920 on a 'free discharge'.  He was granted the War Gratuity whilst on HMS Delhi's lists.  (This ship was a Danae class light cruiser).  Horace married Annie Adams in 1922 and died in 1983 in the Worcester District.  (His connection to Hallow is not known).
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Maurice Henry HUBAND, Private
Service No. 29140, Oxford & Bucks. Light Infantry

Maurice was the eldest son of Thomas and Emma of Holywards (or Hollywards) Farm, Moseley, Grimley, Worcs. (Census 1911).  Maurice was born in Newtown, Worcester 28 June 1885 and he had two brothers and a sister.  The entire family worked on the farm. His medal card showed that Maurice enlisted January 1917 and was discharged July 1919. He received the Victory and British War medals. At the age of 34 Maurice was awarded a Silver Badge number B259051 which was issued on 6 August 1919. He had been honorably discharged on the grounds of no longer being fit for service (King's Regulation Para 392 xvi Army Order 29 of 1919). The citation confirmed that he had served overseas.  Maurice died March 1984 aged 98 yr. (Malvern Registration district).
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Harold HUNT, Corporal
Service No Corporal - SN 4978 (not proven), RFC / RAF

Harold was born c. 1896 and lived with his mother, Hannah, and his two brothers and a sister. Their address in 1911 was 1 Hallow Road, Worcester. Harold was 14 and worked in an iron works, driving a steam hammer.  When Harold enlisted in the RAF he gave his father George as next of kin. On all census returns George lived away from the family and he had various occupations including groom, London butler and London bus conductor.
WWI
Harold’s RFC record has not survived, but information was transferred to his RAF file. Harold attested on 25 April 1915 and gave his occupation as a fitter. In the RFC he started as an Aircraft Mechanic (AM) class 2.
On 6 January 1916 Harold was posted to France and in August 1916 he became AM/ 1 and was promoted to Corporal on 1 August 1917. He transferred to the RAF on 1 April 1918 as a Corporal Mechanic. 29 November 1916, Harold was in hospital at St Omer suffering with Myalgia and was discharged 2 January to 1 Aircraft Depot, a supply and repair depot also at St Omer. You can read about this vast depot here:-


Harold was an aero rigger who on discharge gave his address as 5 Hallow Road.  In November 1919 he was in the RAF Reserves. A Good Conduct medal was awarded in 1921. Harold was discharged in April 1923 and married Helen Payne in 1926 and they had two children.

WWII
On the 8 July 1939 Harold enlisted in Class E Reserve for four years, On 8 July he was an Aero rigger, and the following day he was made up to a Corporal .He gave his occupation as Hot water fitter. Harold was discharged on 8 December 1942 (Clause 4 b)

(Brothers Walter and Reginald are shown below)
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Walter John HUNT, Possibly S.S. Corporal
Worcester Hussars

Walter was born 1893 and lived with his mother, Hannah, and his two brothers and a sister. Their address in 1911 was 1 Hallow Road, Worcester. Walter was 18 and worked as a boot maker. If this service number is correct, Walter served from May 1915 to August 1919. No other information found.
(Brothers -  Harold is shown above, and Reginald below)
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Reginald HUNT, Private
Died 6th September (or November) 1918
Service No. M2/074781, Army Medical Corps (PN June 1915) / Motor Transport Clearing
Office, Army Service Corps

Reginald was born c.1890 in Worcester and lived with his mother, Hannah, his two brothers and a sister. Their address in 1911 was 1 Hallow Road, Worcester. Reginald was 20 and worked as a 'chauffeur domestic'. He enlisted in London c. June 1915 and died 6th September 1918 in a Birmingham Hospital, aged 28 (November is stated on his medal card). (Son of George and Hannah Hunt, 5 Hallow Road, Worcester. He was the husband of Margaret Hunt of Coppice Cottage, Kelvedon Common, Essex).  He is buried in St Philip and St James graveyard, NE corner. He was awarded the Victory & British War medals.
(Brothers Harold and Walter are shown above.)
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Frank HURLSTONE, Private
Died of his wounds in Flanders, 1st April 1918
Service No. 41360, 25th Batt. Training Reserve, 7th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment

Frank was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of September 1917. He was born in Hallow c. 1899 and lived at Parkfield Gardens (Census 1901), and died of wounds 1st April 1918 aged 19. He was the son of William Saxty and Catherine Hurlstone (originally from Surrey) and he had three brothers, and three sisters. (Father, William was head gardener at Parkfield). He was awarded the British War and Victory medals and he is buried in Namps-au-Val British Cemetery, France, Grave I. F. 27.  (For more information, click here)
(Brother William is shown below)
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William HURLSTONE, Lance Sergeant (Feb 1915) / Second Lieutenant
Service No. 2252, 2/8th Worcs Regiment

William was born c. 1889, elder brother of Frank, and son of William and Catherine who lived at Parkfield Gardens, Hallow. He was born in Compton, Surrey. His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of September 1914 and he was posted to France April 1915. At that time he was a Sergeant in the 8th Worcester Regiment, later promoted to 2nd Lieutenant. He served in the army until 1925. He was awarded the British War and Victory medals, and the 1915 Star. On his record card, his address was given as the Officers Hospital, Chester also Whitly Villas, Halesowen, W. Birmingham. No other service record has been found. In the Census of 1911, he was an assistant teacher living at Grammar School Lane, Halesowen, lodging with Henry and Matilda Gould and their two children. William married Millicent Ruby Hopkins (of Rugby) in 1919, and died December 1950, aged 62, at the Tewkesbury Hospital (his address at that time was the School House, Bredon, Worcs.). Millicent lived until May 1991, aged 97, her death registered in the district of Derby.
(Brother Frank is shown above)
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John Robert JACKSON, Gunner & Private/Corporal
Service Nos. 1461 / 11616, 2nd South Midland Brigade, RFA and Army Pay Corps

John was born in Fleet in Lincolnshire on 17 May 1889 and was a teacher and a member of the Worcester Territorial Association. He had married Elsie Bowcott from Henwick Road at Hallow church in August 1911 and they lived at 104 Astwood Road. (Once John had been mobilised Elsie moved to 100 High Street.) John completed a Short Service Attestation form on 9 December 1915. There are a lot of alterations to his service number on the form -  4234, 966725, 21023 and 11616 APC (Army Pay Corps). Across the top of the form “will apply for exemption” and down the left side. “Transferred from Army Reserve Class B to RFA (T) 5 May 1916”.
The details of John’s service are :- Placed in the Reserves with service number 1461-  2nd South Midland Brigade RFA and was mobilised as a Gunner on 5 May 1916.  In October he was posted to 66th Division RFA C/331st Bde RFA, in France and two months later was compulsorily transferred to the RGA as a Gunner at AA Depot (Anti Aircraft?) Shoeburyness. Ten days later on 9 January 1917 he was posted to 35 AA Company and transferred on 23 February 1917 as a Private to the Army Pay Corps.  He was promoted to Corporal in March 1918, for which he received 2s per day. Demob was 23 February 1919 when he gave his address again as 104 Astwood Road, Worcester.
John who had been medically Classed as Ai when he attested seems to have had an emergency medical examination board when he was posted 331st Bde in France, in which it was stated that John had fits and suffered from pain after food, and nausea. He was later certified as Biii (suitable for sedentary work abroad) which on 8 June 1917 was changed to Ci (Garrison service at home camps). He was examined on two more occasions the last being on 6 November 1918 when he was classed as Biii again. John is listed as having served in the Armed Forces in the “National Union of Teachers War Record”.
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George William JONES, Private
Service No. 4519, 8th Worcs Regiment

George was born on July 3 1895 at Shelsley Beauchamp and was a 5ft 2ins tall farm labourer when he attested and was embodied into the Territorial Forces 8th Worcestershire Regiment on 22 November 1915.  He signed his name a G William Jones and gave his address as Gatterley Sq. Hallow (Gatley, Shoulton, Hallow?). William served for 54 days until 14 January 1916. William was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of January1916 . On discharge his home address was Fish Street, Worcester. The grounds for his discharge were Kings Regulations para 392. iii, c.KCR . The Medical Board which made the decision indicated that National Federation of Discharged Soldiers and Sailors applied on behalf of this man. Written in pencil is:-  “30% under 3”. He was granted £7 10s of the War Gratuity and his character was given as “Very Good”.
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Walter JONES, Private
Killed in action 23rd October 1918
Service No. 63533, 1/8th Worcs Regiment

Walter was born in Wollaston, Stourbridge c. 1891, but was raised by his uncle, Thomas (a farmer) and aunt, Elizabeth at Yardway, Moseley Turning, Hallow (the Census of 1891 showed Walter as 5 months old.  Also at the address was Mary 28 yr and Elizabeth 26 yrs, both nieces). In 1901, only Walter was living with Thomas and Elizabeth, and in 1911, Elizabeth was a widow, and Thomas was a farm labourer. Thomas was killed in action 23 October 1918 in France and Flanders, and was awarded the British War and Victory medals, but these were returned. He is buried in Highland Cemetery Le Cateuas, Grave III.F.5. No other information can be found.
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Sydney James LAMB, Private / Corporal
Service Nos. 62 & TT/02178, Army Veterinary Corps

Sydney was born in Ombersley c. 1890 to father, Joseph (a groom) and mother, Mary Anne. He had 2 brothers, and 3 sisters, and they lived in Boreley Lane, Ombersley (Census 1891). In the Census of 1911, Sydney was a boarder with the Sayers family at Sinton Fold, Grimley and he was a groom. His medal record card showed his service began 1st April 1915 and he was awarded the British War and Victory medals, and 1915 Star. No other information can be found.
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William Ernest LANCELOTT, Able Seaman
Killed in action 4th February, 1917
Service No. Wales Z/582, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Hawke Battalion
Royal Naval Division

William was born 30 August 1888.  He was a labourer and enlisted in 1915, draft for British Expeditionary Force and joined Hawke Battalion 1916.   He served in France for 7 months before being killed in action 4th February 1917 aged 28. His body was exhumed and named by identity disc - buried in Queens Cemetery, Bucquoy, France, Grave IV. E. 1919.  His wife was Elsie of Aberbeeg, Monmouthshire, later of Irene Cottage, Park Lane, Hallow.  Note: William was 5ft 11ins tall (most of the later Hallow Naval recruits were under 5ft 5ins)
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Ernest Edward LARNER, Private
Service No. 17151, 9th Gloucestershire Regiment

Ernest was born in Charlton Kings, Glos. in 1886. His father, James was a general labourer, and his mother was Annie.  He had two brothers and one sister and they lived at Hawthornes, Charlton Kings (Census 1891).  In 1911, Ernest was a gardener, boarding with William and Annie Sharp at Park Lane Cottage, Hallow.  Ernest was working for Mr Hurlstone at 235 Henwick Road when he enlisted on 18 November 1914 at Cheltenham.  It was noted that his teeth were defective but his physique was very good . He was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine in 1915.  Ernest served in France and Salonika and on discharge indicated that he suffered from malaria originally contracted in Salonika.  Ernest said that he had been treated in the 64th and 28th hospitals.  The 64th was mobilised in Malta and sent to Salonika in 1917, when it became unsafe to evacuate casualties to Malta, and the 28th Hospital was based in France.  Ernest’s final medical report indicated that he had had seven attacks of malaria, the last being in June 1918.
The medal record showed Ernest went to France 20 September 1915 and on 11 November 1915 he embarked from Marseilles for Salonika  and arrived  on 24 November. He was admitted to hospital on a number of occasions, the first in January 1917. Afterwards he was sent to No 2 Convalescent Depot, which he didn’t leave until 19 April.  It has not been possible to decipher all of his Army record and he seems to have changed Divisions.  At the moment we don’t have any details about where he served.  He embarked for France on 9 July 1918 and in August was granted 15 days leave in England.  His final embarkation from France was on 19 February 1919 when he left via Dunkirk.  Ernest was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on demobilization, 20 March 1919 and indicated that he would be living at Westmore House, Ryeworth, Cheltenham.  Ernest was awarded the 1914-15 Star British War and Victory medals . He died in the Gloucester area in 1949.

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Harvey LAWRENCE, Private
Service Nos. 40825 / 43840
Royal Warks / B Co. 14th Worcs Regt

Harvey (also named Henry) was first noted in the Parish Magazine of April/May 1918 and the Absent Voters List of 1918 gave his address as Parkfield Lane, Hallow.  He was born c. 1872 in Grimley, his mother was Eliza Lawrence, and he had a brother Wilfred born c. 1874.  They lived in Powick Lane and Eliza described herself as 'occupier' (Census 1881).  The next census of 1891 showed him as a 19 yr old lodger of Richard and Elizabeth Hodson of 79 Holloway Bank, West Bromwich, and their three sons and one daughter.  Using the name of Henry he gave his occupation as labourer.  By 1911 he was married to Florence and had one daughter and three sons, all born in West Bromwich.  They lived at 4/97 Steward Street, Ladywood, Birmingham and Henry was shown as 'working away' as a labourer/tube fitter.  His medal card showed that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
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Percy LAWRENCE, Private / Corporal
Service Nos. 16/5240 & L/13138
16th Lancers / Corps of Lancers

Percy was noted in the Parish Magazine of June 1916 – no other information has been found.
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Sidney LAWRENCE, Private
Service No. 37940, Somerset Light Infantry

Apart from Sidney being named as in service in the Parish Magazine of April/May 1918, nothing else is known about him.
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Thomas LEE, Private
Service No.  462441, 665 Ag. Co. Labour Corps

All that is known about Thomas is that in 1901 he lived in Martley Road, Worcester and the Absent Voters List of 1919 showed that he then lived in Moseley Road.
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Thomas LEIGH, 10th Somerset Light Infantry
Apart from being named in the Parish Magazine of June 1917, no other information has been found.
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Frederick LEWIS, Private
Service No. 2289, 8th Reserves Bn, Worcs Regt., 3rd Worcs Regt.

Frederick was born cc 1871 in Hallow, and was a labourer. He enlisted May 1889 at the age of 18 and served in the 3rd Worcs Regiment. His records have been burnt, therefore it is not clear whether he served in WWI.
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F. R. LEWIS
See service record under Charles Williams - F. R. Lewis enlisted as Charles Williams in 1914, admitting in 1916 by Statutory Declaration that his true name was Charles Williams, Born in Hallow.
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Christopher Henry LOCK, Sapper / Lance Corporal 
Service Nos. 138041 & WR 253371, R.E. Railway and Canal Transport Establishment /
Royal Engineers

Christopher was born in Hallow c. 1889, his parents were Henry and Mary Lock and the family of 3 boys and 3 girls lived at The Crown Inn, Hallow. He had married Dorothy Honor Johns in 1916 and they lived in London Rd., Worcester.  Christopher was a railway shorthand typist when he enlisted in London November 1915 and embarked for France in January 1916.  He was awarded a Good Conduct medal which he received from the Director of Railway Traffic on 23 March 1918. Christopher became a paid Lance Corporal in May of that year and was demobbed July 1919. (His service record is limited as it is either burnt, or badly faded). He died in 1954 aged 64.
Brother, Percy is shown below.
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Percy Walter LOCK, Private / Trooper
Service Nos. 48 & TT02169, Army Veterinary Corps

Percy was born in Hallow c. 1894. His parents were Henry and Mary Ellen and they lived at the Crown Inn, Hallow. In 1911, the family consisted of three boys and 3 girls. Percy worked as an assistant brewer, "helping in the business". He enlisted April 1915, and he received the British War and Victory medals and the 1915 Star. No other service record can be found. He died 11 March 1965 in Ronkswood Hospital aged 70 - his address was Gracelyn, School Lane, Hallow and he left his estate to his sister Gertrude Lock, and Kenneth Lock. (Brothe,r Christopher is shown above).
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Sidney Pratt LOCK, Private
Died 12th October 1915
Service No. T/46, South Midland Division Army Veterinary Corps

Sidney was born 6 November 1891 in Hallow. His parents, Benjamin (a railway clerk) and mother, Annie Maria had a family of three boys and one girl, and they lived at The Green, Hallow (1901 Census). From March 1907 to March 1911, Sidney worked for the Gt Western Railway at Worcester. In 1911 the family lived at Elmley Cottage, Hallow and Sidney had become an apprentice butcher. He had recently married Lucy and they were living with his parents. He joined active service c. April 1915, and was taken ill 12th October with enteric (typhoid) fever. He was taken to the Canadian Hospital in Cairo, where he died 13th November 1915 (aged 24). He was buried in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, Grave D. 192.
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George LODGE, Sergeant
Service No. 16683, 8th Worcs Regiment

George James Lodge 1895-1938 was shown as a 15 year old errand boy on the 1911 census, his father was a gardener to a fruit grower.  George was first noted in the Parish Magazine of October 1914, and in April 1915 was 'now in active service'.  The January Magazine reported George as severely wounded and in Edinburgh Hospital.
(Brother, Thomas is shown below).
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Thomas Henry LODGE, Gunner
Service No. 91840, Army Service Corps / Royal Garrison Artillery

Thomas was born c. 1887, son of Henry (a gardener) and Elizabeth (a jacket maker). He had one sister and one brother. In 1891 he lived in Greenhill Lane, Hallow.  He married Clara Rouse of Hallow in 1909 and they had a son, William George 8 months old (Census 1911).  At that time the family lived with father-in-law, James Rouse (a farm labourer and a widower) in Moseley Road, Hallow.  Thomas was a market gardener.  He enlisted/attested in November 1915 and was posted/mobilised to France April 1916 and later posted as a Gunner with the RGA.  He then went on to the Heavy Artillery Depot at Woolwich.  On 8 January 1917 he joined the RGA as part of the BEF.  During 1917, he had health problems and was in hospital on three separate occasions - his file recorded that he was on the War Office casualty list for HB  9107  in November 1917 as he had received a gun-shot wound and was admitted to 83 General Hospital, Boulogne, which was part of the casualty route for the wounded to be evacuated for longer further treatment in the UK.  Thomas was sent from there to Lakenham Military Hospital, Norwich which specialised in seriously sick or wounded soldiers. Thomas returned to duty and on 15 October 1918, whilst serving with 26 Heavy Battery, he was admitted to the 30 General Hospital, Calais classed as wounded (NYD).  The injury seems to have been from a gas shell.  He was discharged to No 5 Rest Camp which was at Ecault two miles from the docks at Le Havre.  On 16 November Thomas was posted from base to 152 HB which had 6 x 60 pounder guns and was serving with 84 Brigade, but Thomas was back in hospital in mid December as “sick”.  On 26 December he left 14 Con Depot  for Chiseldon Dispersal Centre, and once again in 1918.  He was demobbed 26 February 1919, and was awarded the British War and Victory medals.  At the time of his death, 23 November 1948 he was living at 23 Ashcroft Road, Worcester.  He died in Worcester Royal Infirmary, aged 62.
(Brother George is noted above)
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John Arthur LORD, 2nd Lt./Lieutenant / Captain
13th Hussars/Worcs Yeomanry

John Arthur Lord was born 16 November 1896 at Kings End, Powick, the son of the solicitor and land agent Arthur Lord and Helen Lord nee Bramwell who lived at Hallow Mount. His father, who had been born at Hallow Park, is best known to the village for his business association with Mrs Amy Wheeley Lea.  During WWI John’s father was Chairman of the Martley Food Control Committee; member of the local Military Tribunal and Hon Treasurer of the Worcester and District Soldiers and Sailors Association.  At the time of both the 1901 and 1911 census the family, including John’s sister Helen, were on holiday at Westcliff, Bournemouth.  John was educated at Eton College and the London Gazette of 10 May 1915  lists the following –  Worcestershire the Queens Own Worcestershire Hussars the under mentioned to be Second Lieutenant - Private John Arthur Lord of the Eton Contingent , Junior Division, OTC. The Parish Magazine congratulated John on receiving his commission. Only John's medal record card can be found which showed that he received the British War and Victory medals.  In 1921 John was still in the Army and he is recorded on a passenger list sailing from Liverpool for Bombay, with a number of other Army Officers and civilians.
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Harry aka Henry LOWE, Corporal / Sergeant
Service Nos. 325742 & TF126 TT/02229, Worcs Yeomanry and Corps Hussars/
Army Veterinary Corps

This soldier was noted in the Parish Magazine of May 1916 and on the Absent Voters List of 1918 but no other information has been found.
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John Edward LOXLEY,
Service No. possibly SN 130971, Royal Air Force

John (1877-1964) was one of Francis and Mary Loxley’s sons. In 1911 John and his wife Sarah (nee Quarterman) were living at No 1 Lechmere Crescent with their four children Francis, Dorothy and the twins Jane and Louise, who were just four months old.  John’s occupation was given as grocer’s assistant. His military record showed that he joined the RFC on 12 February 1918 and was classed as ”Misc (Labour) an “A.Mech 3”.   In April 1918 the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service were amalgamated to form the Royal Air Force.  John was remustered as RAF Private 2 -  no other information about him has been found.
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Samuel Joseph E. LUCKROFT,
Motor Transport Army Service Corps

Samuel Joseph Ernest Luckroft was born in Torquay 6 February 1879. In the Census of 1911, he gave his name only as Joseph. His wife was Emily nee Rea and they lived at Mount Lodge, Hallow.  Emily was born in Hallow. His occupation in 1901 was a valet, and in 1911 he was a motor driver. His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of August 1916 so he may have enlisted about that time. He died in Harrow Isolation Hospital 11 December 1942, aged 63. His address then was 243 West End Lane, West Hampstead, London N.W.6. He left his estate to Harry Edwin Rea, his brother-in-law who was a civil servant. He was awarded the British War and Victory medals.
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Russell Hamilton McBEAN,
Royal Navy, HMS Arrogant

Russell was born in 1894 to Thomas and Jessie Mc Bean of Sinton Court, Grimley. In 1911, he was a Naval Cadet on board HMS Cumberland.  He was wounded at Ostend assisting the torpedoing of both east and west piers - he sustained a severe machine gun wound to his right shoulder whilst providing a smoke-screen cover and guiding lights from a coastal motorboat for HMS Vindictive, engaging the machine-gun fire at point blank range. He was treated at Dunkirk and Chatham hospitals, convalescing at his home, Hallow Park, in June 1918.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (October 1918), presented by the King at Buckingham Palace. He also received the Distinguished Service Order.

He went to Shanghai 25 January 1919 and worked for the Government, and in September 1936 he was  appointed Lieut. Commander and sent to Colombo.

Russell died September 30, 1963 and was buried in the cemetery at St Peters Nyeri Central Province, Kenya.

(His other medals were the 1914-15 Star, Victory & British War Medals).  For more information, please click here and to read about HMS Vindictive, click here.

Also see websites - See websites –


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Arthur MANN,
8th Worcs Regiment

Arthur was born in Hallow in 1891 and was one of the sons of Thomas Mann, a bricklayer, and his wife Lucy, nee Andrews.  Arthur completed a Short-term Attestation form in November 1915 and gave his home address as 2 Blanquette Street, Worcester where he lived with his wife Sarah, nee Hayfield, and their daughter Dorothy, who was born on 13 July 1915. Arthur enlisted on 29 November 1915 and was placed in the Reserves from which he was mobilised on 27 July 1916, and following his medical, he was in Category B2 and was posted to the Royal Berkshire Regiment 13th (Labour) Battalion. Arthur went to France in the September. He was transferred with part of the 13th Battalion to the Southern Command Labour Corps and then to Labour Corps 164 Company in May 1917. It is possible that he was already troubled by the painful condition which would later mean that he spent several weeks from June until the 25 October 1918 in and out of different hospitals in France, but Arthur was able to rejoin the Company on 2 November 1918.  He was posted to the 197 Company on 29 December 1918, but was still suffering and was admitted to five different hospitals in the space of a week. Arthur was then invalided home from 24 General Hospital Etaples. http://www.ramcjournal.com/content/142/1/43.full.pdf.  Arthur was in the County of Middlesex Hospital Napsbury, St Albans
http://www.hertfordshire-genealogy.co.uk/data/places/places-n/napsbury/napsbury.htm for 12 days in April 1919 and was posted to Southern Command Labour Corps  - Winchester, and from there demobilised to Class Z Army Reserve on 7 June 1919 when his character was described as good.  Arthur was awarded the British War Medal & Victory Medal which he received in 1920. He died in 1954.
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Francis Edward (aka Frank) MANN, Private
Service No. 9263, 3rd / 6th Worcs Regiment,

Francis was born in Hallow c. 1884, and married Elizabeth Jeaks on 15 October 1905. He worked as a labourer, when he enlisted in September 1914, and he stated that he had previously served for 5 years in the Royal Marine Light Infantry and was "bought off". The service records have been burnt and not easy to read, but it seems that Francis was home September to November 1914, in France (Expeditionary Force) 7 to 16 November 1914, and home 17 December 14 to 15 November 1915.  Another note - "Bt wound of finger". When applying for his War medals, he gave a discharge date of 13 November 1916. (A Certificate of Sobriety & Trustworthiness was issued 27 December 1915, together with a War Badge - a letter dated 1 January 1916 stated   "The officer named on the Sob. Certificate has declined employment in the Post Office" and returned the Certificate for disposal - signed ? Postmaster.)  He was awarded the 1914 Star (August 1919) and British War and Victory medals (January 21).
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George Henry MANN, AB Seaman
Service No. J54675, HMS Impregnable HMS Caledon (Mess 9)

George was born on 24 June 1900 at Grimley, son of George and Annie Mann, who later lived in McIntyre Road, St John’s. He had been learning ‘hot water fitting’ when he joined the Navy as a 16 year old  “Boy” on 27 June 1916. He trained at the land bases HMS Impregnable and HMS Victory 1. George’s service record shows that he joined HMS Caledon on the day before she was accepted into service with the Grand Fleet on 7 March 1917. The ship was a Light Cruiser and as part of the Light Cruiser Squadron was sent to Scapa Flow. She saw action against the German fleet off Heligoland in November 1917 and was struck by a 12in shell. She returned to duties at Scapa Flow and was present when the German Fleet surrendered and was interned there. George became an Ordinary Seaman in December of that year and was attached to the shore base HMS Vivid for two months in early summer 1918. Back on HMS Caledon in July 1918 he was an Able Seaman and was with the ship at the end of the War remaining with her until 15 December 1920. He was paid the War Gratuity and received two Good Conduct Badges. George qualified as an Anti-Aircraft Lewis Gunner in 1927 and left the service in 1929.
George's marriage to Jessie Crowe on 22 July 1919 was noted in the Parish Magazine.
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Herbert George MANN, Private
Service No. 20419, 9th/12th Worcs Regiment

Herbert was born in 1878, the eldest son of Thomas and Lucy Mann.  He married Mary Ann Weaver in 1899 and they had 5 surviving children all living at home in Hallow (Census 1911).  Herbert was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine in January 1915, and in April 1915 was noted as 'now in active service'. Herbert was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal  on  March 28, 1918 for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as runner, carrying messages both day and night often under heavy fire at the Battle to relieve Kut-al- Almara. An overview of the Mesopotamia Campaign is here:-
Page  221 of “The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War” by Captain H FitzM Stacke describes the situation that the 9th Worcestershire regiment faced with the 7 & 9th North Staffordshires and the  9th Royal Warwickshires on 25 January 1916 when the guns of both the British Artillery and the Turkish forces kept up an intense fire and losses on both sides were heavy. By 3.15pm the ammunition began to give out. The exhausted 9th Worcestershires, whose platoons were by now leaderless, tramped back with the Royal Warwickshire’s across open ground through fierce shelling and when they reached the front line filed into the trench. Only a remnant of the 39th Brigade came back, over 900 had lost their lives.  (In April 1916 the garrison at Kut-al-Almara surrendered, a blow to British morale and prestige and a fillip to the Turks.)
 “The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War” by Captain H FitzM Stacke also lists Herbert as having been mentioned in despatches in the London Gazette on 15 August 1917.
(Brother, Thomas is shown below)
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Thomas Oliver MANN, Sergeant (1914), Company Quartermaster Sergeant (1917)
Killed in action 31st May 1917
Service No. 11083, 1st Worcs Regiment

Thomas was born in 1889, one of the eight children of Thomas and Lucy Mann nee Andrews.  Little is known about Thomas’ youth except that he had been a member of the choir at Hallow parish church.  By the time of the 1911 census, Thomas had already enlisted and was a Lance Corporal in Parkhurst Garrison Carisbrooke, on the Isle of Wight. It is assumed that all of his service was with the Worcestershire Regiment.  The Regiment’s on-line WWI database indicates that he was a corporal, Colour Sergeant and Company Quartermaster Sergeant with the 1st Battalion.  He married Annie Mitchell in 1916, but the following year he died of wounds on 31 May 1917. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Belgium Grave XVI.G.7A.  The Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery website http://www.lijssenthoek.be/en/adres/11429/-thomas-olliver-mann.html indicates that Thomas first went to France with the BEF on 5 November 1914 and died of gunshot wounds which penetrated his back and abdomen.
(Brother Herbert is noted above)
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Edward George MARGETTS, Private
Service No. 38024, 2nd Gloucester Regiment

Edward was born in 1897 and was the second of seven sons and one daughter born to Thomas (a baker) and Lucy Margetts, nee Hall. Before the 1911 census the family were living at Hallow Green and then moved to Croyden Villas, Oldbury Road, which was at that time in Hallow parish. His Army Record has not survived but the Medal Card Index showed that he was awarded the British War and Victory medals.  (Brothers, Frederick, Horace and William are shown below)
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Frederick Leonard MARGETTS, Stoker
Service No. SS118745, Royal Navy

Frederick Leonard Margetts was born on 11 June 1900, according to his Naval Service record. He was one of the seven sons and one daughter born to Thomas (a baker) and Lucy Margetts nee Hall. Before the 1911 census the family were living at Hallow Green and then moved to Croyden Villas, Oldbury Road, which was at that time in Hallow parish. Frederick joined the Royal Navy on 21 June 1918 and spent just over 4 months training attached to the shore base Victory II at Portsmouth where he was classed as a Stoker 2.  On 7 November he joined HMS Carlisle, a new light cruiser which was commissioned just a few days later, so Frederick’s war-time service was very brief.  Frederick remained with the HMS Carlisle until December 1920 during which time he was promoted to Stoker I.  HMS Carlisle was with the 5th Light Cruiser Squadron, first at Harwich and later, in 1920, in China.  For Frederick the first three months of 1921 were spent attached to the shore base Victory II and from 1 April to 15 June 1921 Frederick was with HMS Dryad (Carstairs) - although on-line databases indicate that HMS Dryad was not Carstairs until 1924 . HMS Dryad was a navigation school ship and Frederick’s service record does show “shore on reduction”.  Frederick’s character was classed as “Very good” and he received a Good Conduct medal in 1921. He was paid the War Gratuity and possibly a £20 bonus. (writing indistinct).
(Brother, Edward is shown above, and Horace and William, below)
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Horace Ashby MARGETTS, Private
Service Nos. 29343 / 0343 / G/31613, 2nd Dorsets/ Hants Rgt / Royal Sussex

Horace had six brothers, and his parents were Thomas and Lucy Margetts nee Hall of 1 Croydon Villas, Oldbury Road, Worcester.  He is mentioned in the Parish Magazines of July/August 1918, and the Absent Voters List of 1918 says '2nd Bn No. 2 Comb Brit Inf Dep Private 29492’.  Horace was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.
(Brothers Edward and Frederick are noted above, and William below)
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William Thomas MARGETTS, Driver
Service Nos. 3282 & 831224, 3/2nd Midland Brigade (TF) & Royal Field Artillery

William Thomas  Margetts was a porter,  another of the seven sons of Thomas and Lucy Margetts nee Hall of 1 Croydon Villas Oldbury Road Worcester. William attested on 20 May 1915 aged 19 as a Driver in the 2nd Midland Brigade and embodied on the same day into the Royal Field Artillery. He was based in Worcester for just over a year and during this time like many others had essential dental treatment. He disembarked as part of BEF on 25 May 1916 where he remained until 31 July 1918.  The Officer Commanding the Brigade “awarded” him 15 days Field Punishment No 1 for absence from Horse Lines Picquet & failing to comply with an order. You can read about the nature of this punishment here http://www.1914-1918.net/crime.htm. The next writing on his Army record is indistinct but is to do with his pay, possibly an increase.  On the 5th October 1917 William was granted 10 days leave with a ration allowance (ratallce) and he would have to wait until the following August for his next furlough of fourteen days to the UK via Calais. At the same time (3 August 1918) his daily War Pay increased from 2d to 3d per day. On the 14 September the Commanding Officer of 306 sent him to the 5th Army Signal School and he later seems to have taken a course 3rd Army Heavy ......... (Artillery?).  William was attached to 265 Headquarters 306 Brigade on 28 Sept 1918 - 5th Army Signal School and rejoined as a Driver, Headquarters 306 Brigade on 23 November of the same year. William had 14 days leave to UK from 19 April 1919 and confusingly seems to have rejoined again on 10 May 1919 with Regimental Number 831224. This event was followed by further UK leave during May and June, before returning to the UK and being demobbed on 11 July 1919.  He was awarded the British War medal and Victory Medal
(Brothers, Edward, Frederick an d Horace are shown above)
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John James MATTEY, Private
Service No. 33378, 6th Worcs Regiment

John was born in Powick c. 1877 to George (a gardener) and Mary and in the Census of 1891 he had two brothers and a sister.  He married Georgina Dyke of Worcester in 1904.  They had a daughter and a son, and lived with Georgina's father (a retired Grocery warehouseman) at 11 Bedwardine Road, St Johns, Worcester (Census 1911).  John was a gardener at a nursery.  After Georgina died 15 March 1913, John married Ellen Smith in 1914, and lived with his two children, and her adopted daughter at Moseley Cottage, Moseley Road, Hallow.  They later had their own daughter.  John enlisted December 1915 and was posted to France July 1916.  His service record showed that in order to receive the correct amount of pay, his second wife, Ellen, wrote to the Army, enclosing verification from Hallow schoolmaster Mr. Morton, to explain their family situation, and providing the death certification of Georgina.  John received the British War and Victory medals.
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Charles MILLWARD, Private
Service Nos. 33118/248472/WR 2353623536, 5th Worcs Rgt / Royal Engineers

Charles was born in 1887 at Hillhampton, Great Witley.  In the 1891 Census, his mother, Fanny, was a widow with 5 sons and 1 daughter, and lived at Woolstans Lodge, Great Witley, together with a lodger.  In 1901, the family lived at Stanford Road, Great Witley and Charles was a wagoner's boy.  He later became a roadman.  In September 1910, Charles married Alice Blount of Lindridge, and they lived in Crown Cottage, Hallow.   No service record can be found and Charles' name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of August 1916, so he may have enlisted around that time.  His name was also on the 1918 Absent Voters List.  He died 5 July 1963 at the age of 75 yrs (his address at that time was 259 Moseley Road, Hallow).
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William Henry MINETT, Driver
Service No. 150067, 62 Reserve Battery, Royal Field Artillery

William was born 26 March 1896 in Comberton, Kidderminster.  His father, Thomas was a farm wagonner, and his mother was Annie.  In 1901 they lived at 49 Manor Road, Upper Mitton, Stourport, and in 1911 they lived at Fieldy Place Cottage, Shoulton.  By this time the family had grown to 4 sons and 2 daughters.  William enlisted in Stourbridge December 1915.  He gave his address as Race Course Cottages, Stourbridge and he was a farm horseman.  He was posted to France and other than a spell in Ripon Hospital suffering with influenza July 1918, his burnt service record gives little other detail.  He was demobbed in March 1919 and he received the British War and Victory medals.  William died March 1976 at the age of 80.
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Charles Revill MOODY, Private
Service No. 18348, 14th Coldstream Guards

Charles Revill Moody 1898-1975 was the youngest son of Harry and Emma Moody. Charles married Edith Taylor in 1923. No information has survived concerning his WWI service. The family lived in Colwall, Herefordshire and his son Sergeant James Revill Moody who served in the RAF 138 Squadron in WWII is remembered on the website dedicated to RAF Tempsford casualties. (He died in a Halifax LL364 which collided over the drop zone with another plane) http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Bedfordshire/TempsfordAircrewLost1944.html
(Brothers George and Harry are shown below)
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George R. MOODY,
Mechanical Transport ASC

George was born in 1895 and was one of County Police Constable Harry Moody’s sons who served in WWI. George was born in Blakedown, Worcestershire and was living with his parents at the Police Station, Clifton on Teme at the time of the 1911 census. His occupation was as a grocer’s assistant. George’s Army Service record has not survived.  He married Hilda E. Griffin at Cropthorne, Worcestershire in 1923. (Brothers – Charles, above and Harry below).
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Harry MOODY, Trooper
Service No. 1640, 1st Australian Light Horse

Harry was the eldest of three serving sons of Police Constable Harry Moody from Staffordshire and his wife Emma. Harry Senior moved around with his job. In 1901 he was in Rochford near Tenbury Wells, later Clifton-on-Teme, Hallow and Broadway. All of these Worcestershire places are mentioned on the younger Harry’s Australian Imperial Forces service record which is on-line  http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/explore/defence/service-records/army-wwi.aspx
Harry took the oath to serve the King at Liverpool, NSW, Australia on 20th July 1915. He was 21 years old and had been a butcher in civilian life having served his 4 year apprenticeship in Bromyard, Herefordshire. Harry joined the 1st Australian Light Horse. His initial medical examination had remarked that his enlistment was “conditional on teeth”, but his Attestation was approved on October 21st. In January 1916 Harry went to Egypt to join the Western Force. He was transferred to “Niagara”? on 22 June, but was in the 36th General Hospital with “def feet”,  by 28 July he had been discharged to duty, but was back in hospital again within a month suffering from NVD (nausea vomiting & diarrohea) – and club foot, called elsewhere on the hospital reports “pes cavus”. The hospital discovered that the condition had only come on in March 1916, but it had steadily got worse and although Harry had been transferred to Mess Orderly, the condition of both of his feet had deteriorated, they were swollen and he was in pain and crippled by the condition. The abbreviated text is difficult to follow but he was returned to Australia and discharged in 1916. Another page states that the discharge was due to deformed feet and debility. He served for 11 months and was entitled to the 1914-1815 Star.
(Brothers Charles and George are shown above).
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John Henry MOON, Sergeant / Corporal (July 1916)/ Second Lieut. (1917)
8th Worcs Regiment

John was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of March 1916.  He was twice wounded, the second time seriously and treated at the Anstic Grange Military Hospital, Holmwood, Surrey. He sustained this injury in France, a shrapnel wound to his knee from a bursting shell.   He lived at Windsor Cottage, Hallow.
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Albert Victor MOORE, Fitter / Turner
Service No. 66711, A Mech 2/A Mech3 / RFC/RAF

Albert was born in 1897, son of Albert and Hilda Moore. In 1916 his mother remarried and  became Mrs Davies and she appeared on Albert’s RFC/RAF service record as his next of kin - Hilda Davies of Poplar Row, Hallow -  which was his address for electoral roll purposes. Albert was a Metal Turner by trade when he enlisted on 13 March 1917 as an Air Mechanic 3.
If anyone can help establish where Albert was based, we should be very pleased to hear from you. It certainly seems that on 18 July 1918 he was posted to France until 27 February 1919 and another part of his service record shows that on 26 February he had extended his service by two years.  Albert was in France again from March to August 1919. The information below includes that in February 1920 he was at RAF Manston. “1 SAR W,” possibly Search and Rescue?
Albert was awarded the British War and Victory Medals.
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William Henry MOORE,
No Service number - could be 19634 or 466121
Agricultural Labour Unit or Labour Corps

The Absent Voters List of 1918 stated that Williaml lived at 30 Comer Gardens (which is the same address as servicemen Hughes and West).
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Joseph (Joe) MORGAN,
Royal Field Artillery

Joe was born in Hallow, 1895.  On the 1911 census he was living at 105 Hylton Road with his brother George and his wife Lizzie. Other members of the household were Joe and George’s brothers Charley and Edward, their mother Eliza, George’s son Reginald and adopted daughter Elsie Nash. This is all the information we have at the moment as his service records have not been found and as there were a large number of soldiers with the name Joseph Morgan who served in the RFA it has not been possible to identity his medal card in the British Army WWI Medal Rolls card index.
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William John MORGAN, Private
Service Nos. 36171 / 177288, 6th Worcs Regiment / Machine Gun Corps

William was born in Redmarley c. 1898 - his father, William was a cowman and his mother was Louisa.  They lived at The Moors, Redmarley, Worcs.  In the Census of 1901, there were two children, William and an elder sister.  By 1911, William's mother had died, and there were now three sons and two daughters in the family, living at the Pinch Cottages, Hallow, with a housekeeper, Elizabeth Lodge.  No other information has been found other than a medal card which shows that William received the Victory and British War medals.  As his name first appeared in the Parish Magazine for November 1916, he may have enlisted about that time.
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Frederick MORRIS,
8th Worcs Regiment

Other than this soldiers name appearing in the Parish Magazine of January 1915, no other information has been found.
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Ernest MUNSLOW,
Service No. PLY/11993, Royal Marines HMS Duke of Cornwall / Royal Marines Light Infantry

Ernest was born 24 October 1883, son of a railway worker.  After briefly working as a Railway Porter, he became a postman, an occupation to which he returned after the war.  He enlisted 2 August 1914 and served in the Eastern Meditteranean.  He was reported as 'wounded, discharged/no longer capable of active service'.  He was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory & British War Medals.  (For more information, click here).
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Henry (Harry) MYLAM, Private / Driver
Service Nos. 9067 & 78090, 33rd Battery R.F.A. and "V" Battery, 6th Carbineers,
Royal Horse Artillery

Henry, usually known as Harry, gave Moseley Road, Hallow as his home address when he attested to serve in the Worcestershire Regiment Special Reserve on 24 February 1914. He was under 18 years of age - he variously called himself a farm labourer and a baker. (He gave Mr Fisher of Park Farm and Mr Williams of Hallow Bakery as his referees). Harry undertook a month’s musketry course from 13 June 1914 and at the age of 18 his request to join the Royal Horse Artillery & Royal Field Artillery was granted. His aunt Mrs Charlotte Hill and later his sister Emily both of Camp Lane, Hallow, were stated to be his next of kin.  Harry was classed as a driver and on 2nd March 1915 was serving with other British servicemen in V Battery by then part of the Meerut Brigade of the 2nd Indian Cavalry Division of the RFA. He was seriously wounded in action, with a wound to the chest – left side, hip and right wrist, The injuries were caused accidently by a trench mortar  explosion and he spent most of March in the 10 Station Hospital, St Omer. Of those men also in V Battery seven died outright, seven died of wounds, twenty-four were wounded and ten were wounded and rejoined the unit.  (For more information click here) .

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Alfred James NIBLETT, Sapper
Service Number could be  5980, WR/265721, 20635, 247668 ?
Could be Private Army Cyclist Corps / Royal Engineers /
Durham Lt Infantry or Royal Engineers ?

Alfred was noted in the Parish Magazine of June 1918, but no other information has been found.
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Francis Horace NIND, Private
Service No. 353348, Railway Transport Establishment, Royal Engineers

Francis was noted in the Parish Magazine of September/October 1918. Apart from the fact that he lived/stayed at The Pound House, Hallow, no other information has been found.
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Thomas Henry NORTH,
Service No. 267044, R.M.E.

Little information has been found about Thomas.  He was born in Eton Wick, Bucks., his father was also named Thomas, a general labourer, and his mother was Harriet, and he had two sisters.  In 1901, Thomas was a boarder of James and Mary Finch, of Hallow, and he was working as a domestic gardener.  In 1911, he was a lodger of Susannah Morley of Hawthorn Villa, Hallow Road.  She employed a servant, and Thomas may have been her gardener.  Thomas' name appeared in the Parish Magazine of July/August 1918 which reported he had been 'called to service'.  His Service record is very badly damaged from the bombing of the records in WWII.  It appears that he was drafted to BEF and that his transfer documents were forwarded from Fenny Stratford Signal Depot. That is all the information that has survived.
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Alfred Edward OAKEY, Private
Service No. 267044, 7th Royal Warwickshire (1917),143rd Trench Mortar Battery (1918)

Alfred was born c. 1886 in Grimley, the eldest of 3 brothers and 4 sisters.  His parents, James (a general labourer) and Jane lived in Moseley Road (Census 1891) and the family moved to Parkfield Lane, Hallow (Census 1901).  Alfred's name first appeared in the Parish Magazine of October 1916.  No service record can be found, and his medal card stated he received the Victory and British War medals.  No other information has been found. (Brothers Arthur and Joe are shown below)
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Arthur James OAKEY, 1st Class Signaller
Service No.16668, 12th Royal Warwick Regt

Arthur was born in Hallow in May 1893, brother of Alfred, and son of James and Jane.  He had 2 brothers and 4 sisters, and the family lived in both Moseley Road (Census 1891), and Parkfield Lane, Hallow (Census 1901).  Arthur was a gardener and a member of the Ancient Order of Forresters.  He worked and lived at Coombe Abbey Gardens, Coventry and he enlisted in December 1915.  He was mobilized in February 1916 and posted to France.  He was wounded, and discharged in November 1917 'no longer capable of active service'.  He received the Victory and British War medals.  His death was recorded in January 1985 in Oswestry - his age was 91 yrs.  (Brother Alfred is noted above, and Joe below).
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Joe OAKEY, Driver
Service Nos. 3144 & 831109, Royal Field Artillery

Joe was brother to Alfred and Arthur, and son of James and Jane.  He also had 4 sisters.  His parents were James (a general labourer) and Jane.  The family lived in Moseley Road (Census 1891) and Parkfield Lane, Hallow (Census 1901).  Joe was a domestic gardener.  The Parish Magazine of April 1915 reported Joe as  'now in active service' and in January 1918  'wounded and in Salisbury Plain hospital, one leg amputated'.  His medal card stated that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  His service record cannot be found.  Joe's death was recorded in 1961 in the district of Martley.  He was aged 65.
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Laurence Brudenell OSTREHAN, Private / Lance Corporal
Service Nos. 5935 & 492800, 2/13th London Div., Kensington Regt.

Laurence's military medal card indicated he received the British War and Victory medals.  He served from 22 June 1916 to 5 July 1919.  He was born c. 1893, the son of George and Eva (both artists) who lived in Kensington, London.  (Unsure as to his connection with our district during the war).
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John PAGE,
Royal Navy.

This seems to relate to John Page, a farm labourer who was born c. 1882 in Knighton-on-Teme and in 1901 was living in Martley Road with the Griffiths family. The head of the family Arthur Griffiths was an auctioneer who was married with two young children. Also in the house were a nurse and a female servant. John was back at home in Knighton on Teme at the time of the 1911 census, so it is surprising that he was still being remembered in Intercessory prayers in the Parish Magazine. His naval record cannot be found.
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Alfred Edward PALMER, Private
Service Nos. 5057 & 241767, 3/8th Worcs Regiment

Alfred was born c. 1883 in Hallow.  His parents were Alfred and Mary.  His father was a blacksmith (1891), labourer (1901) and domestic gardener (1911).  Alfred had 3 sisters and 1 brother, and lived in Church Lane, Hallow (1891).  By 1901 the family had moved to Moseley Turning, Hallow.  In the census of 1901, Alfred was working at Bricklehampton Hall, Pershore, lodging with the gardener and another lad in rooms over the stables.  In the census of 1911, Alfred was back at Moseley Turning, living with his grandmother, Emma Palmer, and he was working as an ostler and groom at an hotel.   His name first appeared in the Parish Magazine for August 1916 so he may have enlisted about that time.  His medal card showed that he received the Victory and British War medals.  No other information can be found.  (Brother Arthur is shown below)
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Arthur PALMER, Private
Service No. S4/084878, MT Army Service Corps

Arthur was born in Hallow cc. 1896 and was a younger brother of Alfred Edward.  In 1911 he was a baker's apprentice and lived at Moseley Turning, Hallow.  He enlisted in September 1915 and served in France.  His medal card showed that he received the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals.  No other information has been found.
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Godfrey Herbert PARRY, A.B. Seaman
Service No. J8479, HMS Impregnable/Ganges/Leviathan/Vivid I/
King Alfred/Cornwallis/Erin/Cricket

Godfrey was born in Hallow 18 April 1894 and was the son of Police Constable Herbert Parry and his wife, Alice.  They lived at the Police Station (Census 1901) - by 1911, Godfrey's father had retired, and Godfrey was at the HMR Naval Training Establishment, Shotley, Nr Ipswich.  He gave his occupation as baker's assistant, but this was changed to 'policeman - 18  June 1894' on his service record.  Godfrey served from 18 April 1912 to 30 November 1922, and he received the Star, Victory and British War medals.  (In 1919, Godfrey gave his address as Yew Tree Villas, Hallow on the Absent Voters List). Godfrey married Zoya Gulaeva on 21 September 1928 in Chefoo China (now known as Yantai, in Shandong Province). Zoya died on 11 October 1952 in Manly District Hospital, Sydney.  Her on-line obituary states “beloved wife of Godfrey Herbert Parry and dearly loved mother of Helen" (Mrs. H A Payne). Godfrey died on 28 September 1957 in Sydney. Brother Percy is below.  Click here for more information.
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Percy Randolph PARRY, Leading Seaman
Service No. J20535, Royal Navy, HMS Ajax

Percy was born in Hallow  November 1896, the younger brother of Godfrey, and his sisters Edith and Ethel.  His parents were Herbert, a police constable of Hallow, and Alice and they lived at the Hallow Police station (Census 1901).  By 1911, Percy's father had retired, and Percy, a butcher's apprentice, was the only sibling still living at home, which now was the School Cottages, Hallow.  Percy joined the Navy on 27 September 1912.   On the Absent Voters List of 1918, his address is given as Yew Tree Villas, Hallow.  His wife, Lily was the licensee of the Royal Oak, Hallow.  He died 5th November 1958, and probate detailed his address as the Chase, Hallow.  Percy also served in WWII - click here for more information 
Brother Godfrey is noted above.
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Charles Percy PATCHETT, Private
Killed in action 5th October 1918
Service Nos. 240396 & 2240, 1st/8th Battalion Worcs Regiment

According to information provided for the 1901 and 1911 census Charles Percy Patchett was born in Wednesbury, Staffordshire (GRO Index birth reg West Bromwich ¾ 1895) and not in Hallow as indicated in official records, such as  Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Imperial War Museum websites. His father, also Charles, worked on the railways and it is not unusual to find the family have moved between census returns. In 1901 Charles Snr. was a Foreman Shunter and the family were living at 50 Pearson Place, Norton, Derby and in 1911 Charles Snr. was a Goods Guard for the Midland Railway living at Tunnel Hill in Worcester. The Electoral Roll for 1918 Polling Station J of the parish of North Hallow lists Charles Percy and his brother William Albert Patchett, so the brothers did have a connection to the village, although they were not born here.   Charles enlisted in Worcester September 1914. “Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-19" published by HMSO in 1921 indicates that he was born in Hallow' and that he resided at Manby, Lincolnshire.  Charles was killed in action in Italy, 5th October 1918, and buried in Bellicourt British Cemetery, France, Grave V. C. 3.    (The 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals were awarded posthumously.  (Younger brother William is detailed below).
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William Albert PATCHETT, Private / Lance Corporal
Service No. 22783, 3rd/6th Worcs Regiment, Lewis Gun Section

William was born in 1899 in Walsall, Staffordshire and was Charles Percy Patchett’s younger brother (see above). His parents were Charles and Fanny Patchett from Lincolnshire.  His father worked on the railways and it is not unusual to find the family have moved between census returns. In 1901 Charles Snr. was a Foreman Shunter and the family were living at 50 Pearson Place, Norton, Derby and in 1911 Charles Snr. was a Goods Guard for the Midland Railway living at Tunnel Hill in Worcester. William’s service record has not survived but his medal record showed he received the British War and Victory medals.  The Electoral Roll for 1918 Polling Station J of the parish of North Hallow lists William and his brother Charles,  therefore the brothers did have a connection to the village.
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Alfred (aka Fred) PENNY, Driver
Service No. 1/4 039871, 40th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Service Corps

Alfred (known as Fred) was born in Grimley c. 1895, the eldest of 5 children to parents George (a gardener) and Alice (nee Tyler).  They lived at Thorngrove, Grimley (Census 1911) and Fred was working on a farm as a labourer.  He is recorded in the Parish Magazine of February 1915 so he may have enlisted around this date.  His name also appeared on the Absent Voters List for 1918.  He lived in Church Lane, Hallow and having never married, he died in 1974.  (Brother Thomas is below)
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Thomas George PENNEY, Lance Corporal
Killed in action 24th April 1917
Service No. 241037, 1st/8th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Thomas was born in Grimley c. 1896, the 2nd of 5 children born to George (a gardener at Hallow Park) and Alice nee Tyler.  The family moved to Church Lane, Hallow in 1915.  Thomas enlisted in Worcester and was killed in action 24th April 1917 and buried in Wellington Cemetery, Rieux-en-Cambresis, Nord, France, Grave I. A. 7. (The Parish Magazine of June 1917 reported Thomas as missing).  For more information click here for personal history and his postcards to his family from France.Personnel  (Brother Alfred is noted above).
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Reginald Whitmore PEPYS, Captain
Died of wounds 21st September 1914
2nd / 5th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Reginald was born at Hallow Vicarage 3rd January 1883, son of the Rev. Herbert George Pepys (former vicar of the Parish) and Louisa Harriet, daughter of John Whitmore Isaac of Boughton Park, Worcester, 5th Worcestershire Regiment. Reginald married only shortly before enlisting, and died 21st September 1914 of wounds received in action during the Battle of the Aisne the previous day. Buried in Vendresse British Cemetery, France, Grave III. C. 10.  For more information, click here.
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John Henry PHILO, Acting Staff Sergeant
Service No. 31282, 70th Field Ambulance, RAMC

John married Edith Howard in Worcester 1915.  He lived at 11 Hallow Road, Worcester.  No other information can be found other than his medal card which recorded he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
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Ben Callow PITHER, Signaller
Service No. J5253, HMS Impregnable (1917) / R.N.B. Shotley / HMS Pelorous

Ben was born on 17 June 1901 at Bringsty near Bromyard, Herefordshire, the 7th of nine children. His parents were Charles, a coachman, and Mary.  By the 1911 census Mary had died, and father, Charles was living at Poplar Cottages, Hallow, with Ben and four of his brothers and sisters, and one grandchild.  Ben trained as a Boy on HMS Impregnable and later Ganges (as a signaller). In December 1917 Ben joined HMS Superb, the 4th Dreadnought-type battleship built at a cost of over £1 ¾ million, but she was no longer on active service. From April 1918 until the end of the War Ben’s records show that he was attached to the shore establishment Vivid 1. The Parish Magazine for January 1919 places on HMS Pelorous. In April 1919 he transferred and became a stoker although once again attached to a shore establishment. By 1924 he was a Stoker Class II on board gunnery training ship HMS Tiger. Several transfers followed and he finally left the Royal Navy in 1926.  He was awarded Good Conduct badge in 1922 and another badge after he had left the Service in 1927. He married Kate Pugh in 1929 in the Worcester area and had two daughters. If the family details are correct we should be pleased to hear from any descendants with the surname of Horne or Simpkins who may still be in the area. Ben died in 1984 aged 83.
(Brothers Charles, George, Henry and Robert are shown below).
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Charles PITHER, Seaman Gunner
Service No. 20426, Royal Navy HMS Goshawk, Aurora and Falknor

Charles was born 3 June 1897 in Brockhampton near Bromyard, Herefordshire. He was one of the eleven children born to Charles and Mary Pither who lived at Bromyard in 1901.  By 1911 Charles' mother had died, and his father and 5 of his siblings lived at Poplar Row Cottages, Hallow., whilst Charles was living at The Crown Inn, Lower Broadheath, a lodger of John Fortey, Inn keeper and his wife, Milbro and their children.   He was a baker’s errand boy.  Charles followed his brother George into the Royal Navy as a boy. George had joined in 1908 and Charles in 1912. Charles trained at the shore establishment of HMS Impregnable and other training ships and shore establishments until he was old enough to become an Ordinary Seaman on the new ship HMS Aurora.  He served on Aurora from September 1914 to October 1915. During this time he became an Able Seaman. HMS Aurora was leader of the First Destroyer Flotilla and in August 1915 took part in the sinking of the German ship Meteor.  Charles’ Naval record shows the shore establishments to which he was attached and so it’s not always evident which ship he was serving on.  From the end of December 1915 for one month he served on HMS Blake which was the depot ship to the 11th Destroyer Flotilla. Charles’ name is first noted in the Parish Magazine for September 1914, and he is recorded as serving on the RN HMS Goshawk (1916), HMS Aurora (1917), HMS Falknor (1918). These were all shore establishments, the latter being the parent establishment for the Dover patrol auxiliary small craft. Charles continued to serve in the Royal Navy after the War and became an Acting Petty Officer in April 1925 and Petty Officer a year late. He had received three Good Conduct Medals by 3rd June 1928 year.  (Brother, Ben is above, and George, Henry and Robert are shown below)
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George PITHER, Leading Seaman/ Petty Officer
Service No. J2420, HMS Forth (Oct 1914) Submarine B4 (1915) HMS Vernon (1916)
Royal Navy Submarine N31 (1918)

George was born  21 December 1890 at Claines, Worcester, one of the  eleven children of Charles Pither, a coachman, and his wife Mary.  By 1911 Mary had died, Charles was living at Poplar Cottages, Hallow with 5 of his children and his daughter Jessie’s son. On 21 December 1908 George joined the Royal Navy for twelve years. Here is a brief synopsis of his career- On the census dated 2 April 1911, George was an Able Bodied Seaman on board a Royal Navy vessel HMS Medea. He served on HMS Collingwood during 1913 when she was the flagship of the 1st Battle Squadron.  At the beginning of the War George was attached to the submarine depot ship HMS Forth. In 1915 he became a Leading Seaman whilst serving on HMS Pactolus, a Pelorous Class, Third Class, Protected Cruiser which had been converted to a submarine depot ship and was based in Ardrossan in Scotland, with the 9th Submarine Flotilla.  Other submarine depot ships followed. He is recorded in the Parish Magazine on board a Royal Navy Submarine B4 (1917) and N31 (1918).  According to his naval record it was E31, which in 1918 was attached to the 9th Submarine Flotilla at Harwich. On 17 April 1918 he passed Proficiency for Petty Officer and remained in the Royal Navy after the War, in 1923 passing Master-at-Arms and serving as such from 1926 until he left the Royal Navy in 1928.  George Pither married Josephine Bowkett in 1917 and in 1919 they had a son Claude Horatio Pither.  (Brothers Ben and Charles are shown above, and Henry and Robert are under)
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Henry PITHER, A.B. Seaman
Service No. J33433, Royal Navy HMS Cornflower/HMS Canada

Henry was born 13 March 1899 and like two of his brothers, Charles and George, he joined the Royal Navy. His Naval record showed that he was a Boy who commenced training at HMS Impregnable on 2 February 1915. The shore base Victory I followed and then in August 1915 Henry was on the newly commissioned HMS Canada which joined the Grand Fleet 4th Battle Squadron in October, where he remained until January 1916. (HMS Canada later played her part in the Battle of Jutland). Briefly attached to a shore establishment Henry joined HMS Cornflower in April 1916 and seemedRobert  to have remained with her until 28 February 1919. During this time he became an Ordinary and later an Able Seaman. Cornflower was an Arabis Class sloop, which in early 1919 may have been involved as part of the Minesweeping Flotilla near Egypt. He received a War Gratuity and a Good Conduct badge.  Henry was admitted to RN Hospital Haslor with pneumonia, from which he sadly died on 13 November 1921.
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Robert Benjamin PITHER, Lance Corporal
Service No. 20426, 5th/12th Worcs Regt

The Parish Magazine of April 1915 stated Robert 'now in active service'. He was later wounded in the Somme, and invalided home from the Dardanelles with enteric (typhoid) fever. He was wounded again in France but returned to active service.

Robert was born in 1895 and was the only Pither brother to join the Army in WWI.  His military record has not survived and the Parish Magazine does not mention him as having been injured.  He was awarded all three WWI medals.  His medal card indicates that his first Theatre of War service dated from 28 October 1915 and the theatre of war code 2B means that he was in Gallipoli and the Aegean Islands.  He appears from on-line indices to have married Kate Neal in Essex in 1922 and to have had three sons – Harry, Raymond and David between 1923 and 1927.  Robert may have died in 1928 in Essex.  (Brothers Ben, Charles, George and Henry are shown above).
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Henry POWELL, Sergeant
Service No. 26653, RAMC / Army Veterinary Corps

Henry was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of April 1915 and the Electoral Roll 1915 - he was living at Park Lane, having rooms with Mrs. Annie Watkins. No other records can be found other than his medal card which showed he enlisted November 1915,  was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory & British War medals and he served in the Balkans.
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Charles PRATT, Private / Acting Corporal
Service No. SE/24550, Army Veterinary Corps

Charles was born c. 1890 in Hallow and was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine for March 1917 so he may have enlisted about that time.  He was also recorded on the Absent Voters List of 1918.  His medal card showed that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  He was one of 10 children (1911 Census) and lived with his parents, Henry and Edith at the Royal Oak Inn, Hallow.  All the children were born in Hallow.  Charles was 'an assistant brewer, helping in the business'.  (Brothers Frederick and Henry are shown below, as well as sister, Emily)
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Emily Violet PRATT, Territorial Force Nursing Sister
2nd Northern General Hospital, Territorial Force, Leeds.

Emily was born in Hallow 17th December 1887, the third of 10 children.  Her parents were Henry and Edith and the family lived at the Royal Oak Inn, Hallow (census 1911).  In 1911 Emily was a nurse at the Salop Hospital, Shrewsbury, and in 1914 she had moved to The Sheffield Hospital and was a massage nurse.  She enlisted 11 January 1916 as a Staff Nurse in the Territorial Forces Nursing Service Reserve at the 2nd Northern General Hospital, Beckett Park, Leeds.  She was demobbed 4 February 1920.  For more information click here.
(Brother Charles is shown above, and Frederick and Henry are below)
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Frederick Herbert (aka Bert) PRATT, Private
Service Nos. 325698 & 3165, Worcs Yeomanry/The Queen's Own Worcestershire Hussars

Frederick was born c. 1896 in Hallow, one of 10 children.  His parents were Henry and Edith, and the family lived at the Royal Oak, Hallow.  Frederick was shown on the 1911 census as aged 15 and at school.  He enlisted June 1915.  He was wounded at the Somme, and invalided home from the Dardanelles with enteric (typhoid) fever.   He was wounded again in France, returning to active service but was finally discharged March 1918 as unfit for further active service.  (Brother Charles, and sister Emily are shown above, with brother Henry below).
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Henry Robert PRATT, Lance Corporal
Service No. GS/13667, 3rd Btn. Royal Fusiliers

Henry was born in Hallow c. 1893, and he enlisted 5 October 1915.  The 1911 Census recorded him living with his parents, Henry and Edith at the Royal Oak Inn, Hallow.  He was one of 10 children, all born in Hallow, and he worked for himself as a butcher.  No service record can be found but his medal card recorded that he was awarded the 1915 Star, and the Victory and British War medals. (Brothers Charles and Frederick are shown above, along with sister Emily),
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Harvey PREECE, Sapper
Service Nos. 256371 & WR 269022, Railway Div., Royal Engineers

Harvey was born in Hallow c. 1899, the Census of 1911 recorded that he had a sister, and his parents were Harvey (a wood sawyer & joiner) and Eleanor.  They lived at Lawrence Cottage, Camp Lane, Grimley.  Harvey's name was first recorded in the Parish Magazine of April 1917.   His service record cannot be found, and his medal card showed he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
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Albert Ernest PRICE, Private
Killed in action 16th October 1918
Service No. 88620, 2nd Royal Welsh Fusiliers

Born in Hallow, Albert enlisted in Cardiff.  He died 16 Oct 1918, killed in action - France & Flanders, Western European Theatre.  No other information has been found.
(Brothers Henry and Hubert are shown below)
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Henry PRICE, Private
Service No. 716587, City of London Cycling Regt

Henry is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine for November/December 1918 and again on the Absent Voters List 1918.  We are unable to find any records, or medal cards.  He lived at 16 Farley Street, Worcester. Brother of Albert, above, and Hubert below)
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Hubert E. PRICE, Private
Service Nos. 108984 & 380, 182nd Lab. Co., Labour Corps./ Royal Irish Regt (MCI)

Hubert was recorded on the Electoral Roll of  1918 & his medal card showed he received the Victory and British War medals.  He lived at 1 Albert Villas, Oldbury Road, Worcester.  No other information has been found.  His brothers Albert and Henry are shown above.
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Albert PUGH, Corporal
Service No. 3027, 2nd S.M. Bgde, Royal Field Artillery

Albert was born in Hallow c. 1893 and the Census of 1911 showed him living with the Hatchell family as a servant (ferryman), and his address was Camp House, Grimley. Albert enlisted January 1915 and he was appointed as a 'Shoeing Smith' in October 1915, and promoted '(temporary) to Corporal S.S.' January 1916. He embarked to France May 1916.  He was demobbed December 1918. (No other records are available). In 1911, his widowed father, James (a market gardener), 2 other sons, and daughter lived at Heath Terrace, Hallow. (His younger brother Charles, shown below, was a ferry boy).
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Charles PUGH, Private
Killed in action 24th April 1917
Service No. 30688, Somerset Lt Infantry (PN May 1916) 11th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Charles was born c. 1897 in Hallow, the youngest of 3 siblings who lived with their widowed father, James, a market gardener (Census 1911).  The family lived at 3 Heath Terrace, Hallow.  Charles was a ferry boy on the Severn.  He was first reported missing in the Parish Magazine for June 1917, and it was confirmed 15 months later in July 1918 that he had died in Salonika as part of the Balkan Theatre 24th April 1917 aged 20.  He is commemorated on Doiran Memorial, Greece.
(Brother Albert is shown above)
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Charles Edward John REA, Gunner
Service No. either 675722 or 75484, Royal Field Artillery

Charles was born in Hallow 1882 to father Walter, a coachman (domestic servant) and mother, Adelaide Rea.  He had 2 brothers, and 3 sisters and they lived at Church Lane, Hallow (Census 1881) and Bleabeck Cottage, Hallow (Census 1891).  No other information has been found.
(Brothers Harry and Walter are shown below)
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Harold (Harry) Arthur REA, Private
Service Nos. 6360 & 292743, 1/9 & 10 Btn.
Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex) Regiment

Harold was born in Hallow 1881 to (father) Walter, a coachman (domestic servant) and mother, Adelaide Rea.  He had 2 brothers, and 3 sisters and they lived at Church Lane, Hallow (Census 1881) and Bleabeck Cottage, Hallow (Census 1891).  By the Census of 1911, Harold was married to MaryAnn, and living at 21 Manor Road, Walton, Surrey with their two daughters.  He was employed as a Journeyman/Farrier.  He served in WWI from 1914 to 1920 and was awarded the British War and Victory medals.  Harold died 19th September 1933 - his address at that time was 34 Bremer Road, Staines, Middlesex.  (Brother Charles is shown above and Walter below).
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Walter George RAE, Gunner (1908) Staff Sergeant (1913) & Sadler Staff Sgt
Service No. 102, 1st Battery 2nd South Midland Brigade RFA / /3rd RFA - Territorial Force

Walter was born in Hallow 1875, to Walter and Adelaide Rea of Church Lane, Hallow. He was a self-employed saddler and lived with his wife Mary, and daughter Adelaide at 18 The Butts, Worcester. He enrolled April 1908 and served with the 1st Worcs Rgt. until 1913, re-enlisted for one year as a Territorial. His military history sheet records that he served 'Home, April '08 to 29 March '15, France, March '15 to March '16. His medical history shows he had hospital treatment for dental caries 'in the field' (10 days Oct '15), Scabies (7 days Nov '15), Dental Caries (3 days Dec '15). He was discharged having declined to re-engage (Nov '15) and returned to England 31 March '16. He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, Victory & British War medals.
(Brothers Charles and Harold are shown above)
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Harry Edwin RAE, Lance Corporal / Sergeant
Service Nos. 325458 or 13297 ?, Worcs Yeomanry/ Hussars

Harry was mentioned in the Parish Magazine of February 1915. He lived in Parkfield Lane, Hallow (Absent Voters List). No other information can be found
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Albert Walter RICHARDSON, Private
Service No.117359, Machine Gun Corps

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine of September 1917, Albert later sustained shrapnel wounds, and was in a convalescent camp in France 1918.  He lived in Shoulton Road, Hallow. (He was uncle to Mr. Eric Richardson, Hallow).
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Francis Frederick RICHARDSON
Service No.  TR7/28424, 53rd Training Reserve Bttn, Royal Warwickshire  Regiment

Francis Frederick Richardson was born on 29 January 1900 and was one of the eleven children of Walter and Jessie Richardson nee Hoddy of Shoulton Lane, Hallow. Francis was Eric Richardson’s father.
Francis was a general labourer when he attested at Norton Barracks on 14 October 1918 and became part of the 53rd Training Reserve Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. His engagement was stated to be for the duration of the war. (Elsewhere in his file he is shown as being posted to 58 YS Bttn.)  He had only been in the Training Reserve 10 days when he became ill with pneumonia and spent 40 days in Military Hospital Fargo, which was at Larkhill, Salisbury Plain. The medical report shows that Francis initially had influenza and a special vaccine was given. He was placed on an “SI”? list on 28 October 1918 and as his temperature was back to normal by 2 November he was deemed fit for transfer to Bulford Manor to convalesce. (This had been a Canadian hospital earlier in the War). He was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve after demobilisation on 17 February 1919. His Army Service record states that Francis had reckonable service of 127 days and that his character was “Good”.
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Frederick Charles (aka Fred) RICHARDSON, Lance Corporal
Service Nos. 2723 & 240598, 1st/8th Worcs Regiment

Fred was born c. 1895 in East Comer, his father George was a Printers Overseer with a local newspaper, and his mother was Elizabeth (a.k.a. Bessie).  He was one of 8 children.  In 1901 they lived at Arundel Villa, East Comer.  By 1911, the family had moved to Park Lane, Hallow and Fred was a baker's assistant.  He enlisted 11 September 1914 and was sent to France in March 1915.  In June that year he was wounded (gunshot), July 1916 he was gassed, and April 1917  he was wounded again (shell) resulting in the amputation of his right leg.  After convalescence at Havre, he was discharged September 1918.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  (For more information click here.)
Brothers George and William are shown below.
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George Henry (aka Harry) RICHARDSON, Private (I.C. Lorry Driver)
Service No. M/303276, 11th A.B., R.F.A. Park Section, Royal Army Service Corps,
912 Motor Transport
Born in 1891, George married Mabel Sarah Thomas in October 1914 and lived at 4 Wolverton Road, Arboretum, Worcester. They had a daughter Doris Rhoda in May 1915 and a son Frederick George in May 1916. George was a stereotyper, and enlisted December 11, 1915. He was sent to France in 1917, discharged Nov. 1918 and transferred to the UK for release March 1919.  He was awarded the British War and Victory medals.  (Brother Fred is shown above, and William below)
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William John RICHARDSON, Private
Service Nos. 27824 & 616082, A.V.C./5th/14th Worcs Regiment /
424 Agri Coy, Labour Corps.(1918)

William was born c 1892 to Walter and Jessie and lived in Shoulton Lane, Hallow with his 5 brothers and 2 sisters (Census 1911) William was a farm labourer. He married Mary Elizabeth Taylor in March 1915 and they had a son Cyril William. William enlisted 30 November 1915 and served in France with the British Expeditionary Forces, Southern Theatre (Jan 1917). He suffered 30% disability as a result of gas poisoning (May 1918) and was discharged in May 1919. At this time his home address was given as Heath Terrace, Hallow. He was awarded the British War and Victory medals in March 1922. (Uncle to Mr Eric Richardson, Hallow - 2014)  Brothers Fred and George are shown above)
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Henry John Thomas ROUNDS,
Service No. 14115, 17th Service Battn./ Lancs. Fusiliers

Henry was born in Wolverhampton c. 1882.  In the Census of 1891 he was recorded as living with his mother, Ann at Turnpike Road, Gnosall, Stafford, and in 1901 he was a cattle stock-hand at Haywood Park Farm, Shugborough, Staffs.  He married Sarah Jane in 1908 and his death is registered in Dudley, March 1952.   His name appeared on the Absent Voters List of 1918/1919 and recorded that he was living at Gatley Cottages, Hallow.  . His record card showed that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.   No other information has been found.
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Walter Thomas ROWBERRY,
5th Btn. Royal Warwick Regt

Walter was born c. 1900 and on the Census of 1911, was the eldest of 3 children.  His father, William was a Car Man on the Midland Railway, and his mother was Florence.  In 1901, the family lived at Thorngrove, Grimley and in 1911 they lived at Moseley Turning, Hallow.   Walter may have enlisted around June 1918 as this is when his name was first noted in the Parish Magazine.  No other information can be found.
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Arthur Sydney RUSHTON, Acting Corporal
Service No. 241420, 8th Worcs Regt

There is no-one of that name in any year of the national census; in the Worcestershire Regiment database; on the Imperial War Museum website “Lives of the First World War” a Digital Memorial, or in the Hallow and Broadheath Parish Magazine.
The information we have is from the printed Absent Voters Lists for 1918. It may be that Arthur Sydney Rushden was Acting Corporal Arthur Sydney Rushton of the Worcestershire Regiment, Service Number 241420. If so, he was the son of Frank Rushton, an Ornamental Porcelain Potter and Annie Rushton nee Harper who, in 1911 were living in Waterworks Road.  Arthur married Nellie M Harris in 1917.  Nellie was living in Hylton Road at the time of the 1911 census. The only information about military service is taken from a record card showing Arthur enlisted 25.10.15 and was discharged 14.7.1919.
(There is an A Rushden who served in the Worcestershire Regt. He was an older man, a former farm labourer, from Suffolk who had first enlisted in 1907 and served with the Kings Shropshire Light Infantry, the Worcesters and the Labour Corps. His wife lived in Suffolk and there is nothing in his surviving Army Service Record to indicate any electoral voters residency in the Worcester area.).
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Alfred John RYLAND, Private
Killed in action 25th April 1917
Service No. 31010, 11th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Alfred was born in Hallow c. 1884 to Frederick (a gardener's labourer) and Emma.  Alfred had two younger sisters.  On the 1901 Census, the family lived in Church Lane, Hallow.  By 1911, Alfred had married Miriam Eleanor and they had a son aged 3.  Alfred was a domestic gardener, and they lived at Chapel House, Hallow.  He is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine July 1916 so he may have enlisted around that time.  Alfred was killed in action in Salonika (the Balkan Theatre) 25th April 1917 aged 33.  He is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece.
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Bridget F. Gordon SALMON
Queen Alexandra Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve

Bridget enlisted 20 June 1916 and was sent to Salonica, Greece in July 1916 where she stayed for 3 years, continuing on after the War. She suffered two separate bouts of paratyphoid fever and was reported as dangerously ill. (For more information, click here).  Brother Thomas is noted below.
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Thomas Gordon SALMON, Captain
3rd West Yorkshire, seconded to Ceylon Police

Thomas Gordon Salmon was born in 1879 in Shipton by Benningborough, Yorkshire. He was the elder brother of Bridget Falconer Gordon Salmon (shown above).  His father had been the Reverend Gordon Salmon and his widowed mother Sarah moved to Hallow, sometime between 1911 and 1915. Thomas had already joined the Army and in Harts Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry he is shown on 6 April 1901 as serving with the Prince of Wales Own (West Yorkshire Regt – 3 Battalion) as a Lieutenant in Somaliland and on 21 November 1903 he was promoted to Captain.
You can read about the West Yorkshire regiment in WWI here:-
During WWI he was seconded from his Regiment  to the Ceylon Police and by 1921 he was no longer in the Army and was living in Ceylon [Sri Lanka} as in 1921 there was a newspaper announcement for the forthcoming marriage of  Thomas Gordon Salmon of the Doogalla Estate, Undugoda,(Keylani Vallery, Ceylon [Sri Lanka]) to Margaret Aileen Concetta Wright.  His sister Bridget’s intended marriage was announced at the same time.
The following website shows that he was a manager on the Doogalla Estate in 1922;
The on-line Passenger lists show that Thomas and Margaret travelled back to Ceylon in the 1940’s and Thomas gave his occupation as planter. They later returned to the UK and both died in the Droxford , Hampshire registration district in 1957.
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Albert SAMPSON, Staff Farrier Sgt Major
Attached to Berks Yeomanry, Egypt E.F.

Albert was mentioned in the Parish Magazine of September 1914 as having been ‘wounded but now returned to active service’. He lived in Camp Lane, Hallow.  No other information has been found.
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Albert Henry SAMPSON,
HMS Monarch/HMS Topaze

Albert Henry Sampson was the eldest son of John and Phoebe Sampson. Albert was born on 20 April 1888 in Hallow. By the time of the 1901 census the family had grown to six children and the family were living in Bransford Road, Rushwick. (Nine children by 1911).  Albert joined the Royal Navy in 1910 and is known to have been attached to a number of shore establishments. From May 1914 to July 1917 Albert was on HMS Topaze an old third class cruiser which was initially in the Channel with the 5th Battle Squadron and in December 1914 rescued some of the men who had been on the torpedoed HMS Formidable. 1915 found the Topaze operating in the Mediterranean area having been sent to join the Italian Fleet when Italy joined the Allies. In December 1915 HMS Topaze came under an unsuccessful attack when on escort convoy duties in the Adriatic. She continued in the Mediterranean until March 1917 and then moved to the East Indies station, returning to the Med, Egyptian waters near the end of the War.
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Arthur SAMPSON, Pioneer
Service Nos. 226863 & WR 24995, Royal Engineers

Arthur Albert Sampson (1898 – 1939) and his brother William Charles were living with Horace and Phoebe Hewitt and their two children in Shoulton Lane, in 1911. Arthur and William were Horace’s stepbrothers.  By the time of Arthur’s enlistment into the Royal Engineers on 8 February 1917 he was living at 72 McIntyre Road, St John’s, Worcester and was aged 18 years 9 months old. He stated that his occupation was as an Engine Driver. His Army records show that he was initially a Pioneer paid 6d, becoming a Sapper on 1st May 1918 when he successfully completed a piece of work which entitled him to an Engineer’s rate of pay. As a Roller Driver’s Assistant he was entitled to 1/- rate of pay. But to start at the beginning of Arthur Albert’s War Service - On the 26th February Arthur transferred to the 335th Road Construction Company Royal Engineers, at Aldershot. He embarked to France on 12 March 1917 and his casualty record indicates that he was in hospital a month later on 11 April and was discharged from 7 Con Depot on the last day of April. He arrived at RE base depot on 3 May 1917 and rejoined his Unit on the 15th. He was admitted again to hospital in late October. It is not clear if the abbreviations in the end column of his report form describe what was wrong with him. The last entry on the first page is too faint to read.   He was awarded the Victory Medal. (Brothers Charles, Walter and William are shown below)
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Charles SAMPSON, Private
Service No. 5369, Worcs Regiment- 7th Reserve Battalion

Charles Sampson was born on 19 June 1875 at Grimley.  In 1911 he was a farm labourer living in a small cottage with his wife Rebecca nee Welsh and daughter Edith. Their son Charles Frederick was born after the 1911 census was taken. Charles’ Army Record indicates that he moved to Overbury and later Worcester and that he and his family were living in Little Lane, Pershore, when at 41 years old, on 6 September 1916 he joined the 7th Worcestershire Territorial Force. The medical checks must have been perfunctory when Charles joined up, as 17 days later on 23 September he was admitted to the Military Hospital at Tidworth and diagnosed with Myalgia. He left hospital on 17th November. An Appeal took place in the autumn when details about his health were outlined. Back in 1903, two years after his marriage, Charles had Rheumatic Fever and this,  in conjunction with the Myalgia of 1916, meant that “he is completely crippled and hobbles about with two sticks, he cannot do his duty or anything else in a military way”. The doctor’s report follows and it seems that Charles had pains in his hands and elbows and due to restricted movement he couldn’t hold tools. So 147 days after joining up Charles was discharged from the Army on 30 January 1917 as being “no longer physically fit for War Service para 392 xvi”.  Charles died in the Worcester area in 1959.  Family connections in and around Hallow -   Charles’ father was William Sampson/Samson born near Bromyard in about 1819. He married Lydia Freeman who was about 25 years his junior. She already had at least two sons Thomas and John Freeman who were born at Grimley. Charles Sampson had a sister Kate and three elder brothers John, William and Arthur born circa 1874 as well as four younger ones Fred, Albert  born circa 1880 - both born at Grimley and James and Walter born circa 1885 both born at Hallow. Possibly the Arthur, Albert and Walter Sampson mentioned in the Parish magaziine as serving in WWI are Charles’ brothers. His brother William also served albeit for a short time, and is mentioned below.  In 1911 Charles’ mother Lydia was living in Heath Terrace, Hallow with her stepson George Sampson who at 67 was about one year older than her!
(Brother Arthur is shown above, Walter and William below)
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Walter SAMPSON, Private
Service Nos. 241044 / SN 588795, 8th Worcs Regiment / Labour Corps.

Walter's father, William, a farm labourer was 23 years senior to his wife, Lydia.  There were 11 children recorded over two Census - 1881 (5) and 1891 (6), so it may have been that William had two families.  In 1881  there are 4 boys and 1 girl living with William and Lydia in a cottage at Grimley.  In the Census of 1881, another 6 boys are recorded, with Walter the youngest son.  He was born in Grimley c. 1885 and at this time the family was living in Hallow Road, Hallow.   Walter is recorded in the Parish Magazine for January 1915 so he may have enlisted about that time.  He was awarded the British and Allied Victory medals.  No other information has been found.
(Brothers Arthur and Charles are shown above, William is below)
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William SAMPSON, Driver
Service No. 92201, Royal Engineers

William Sampson was born in 1868 and married Sarah Sophia Ross at Hallow on 26 October 1897. Their first four children were born in the Hallow area and their youngest two at 6 Court, Quay Street, Worcester.
William attested on 16 September 1915 claiming to be 38 years of age and giving Tybridge Street as his home address and his occupation as Driver, whilst on a later form he claimed to live at 26 Bush Walk, St Clements. When he joined up the only observation about his health was that he was pigeon toed. On 23 September 1915 he was approved as a Royal Engineers Driver. The writing on his Army record is difficult to read but it seems that about the time the Army discovered that he suffered from bronchial catarrh and asthma (he had asthma over both lungs), they also found out that he had lied about his age and that he now claimed to be 46 years old - although he was closer to 48. By 30 October he had been discharged as “not being likely to become an efficient soldier” a standard description, in this case referring to his health problems. As he had volunteered he received a Gratuity of £15, including £10 for his two children. (Brothers Arthur, Charles and Walter are shown above).

William’s son William James, was mentioned in the Parish Magazine as he enlisted in the RAF in WWI. Details below.
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William James SAMPSON, 3rd Air Mechanic
Service No.160727, R.A.F.

Born 16 October 1898 in Hallow, the son of William Sampson mentioned above, William James was a fitter & turner who attested on 20 April 1918 and gave his foster father James Roberts of Archbell Cottages to be the person informed if he became a casualty. The 1911 census for Archbell Cottages reveals the Roberts family as James aged 66 a general plasterer and his wife Harriet nee Etheridge aged 57 and their adopted son William. Most adoptions at that time were informal and William enlisted under his birth surname of Sampson. Three years after William’s birth his father had been in Worcester prison so the “adoption” may have taken place then, as his mother had just had another child. His father was back with his mother and the other children in the 1911 census.  William James was posted to No 2 Aircraft Repair Depot at the Airbase at Norton Woodseats, Sheffield and in January 1919, he was re-classed as an AC2 (turner) and in April was posted to  Killingholme, near Immingham in Lincolnshire, at an airbase recently vacated by the Americans who had been assisting with North Sea patrols.  He was transferred to the RAF Reserve on 21 November 1919 and as a result his RAF record continues with details of his marriage on 26 February 1921 to Edith Wilde and subsequent births in the 1920’s of their two daughters Millicent and Doris. He served in Section Class E RAF Reserve from 1924 to 1928.  On 17 June 1938 he enlisted in Sec II “E” Reserve for 4 years and was discharged on 6 October 1942.  Family connections - William’s wife Edith was the daughter of Charles and Maria Wilde. Charles was probably Charles W Wilde, one of the sons of George and Fanny Wilde from Hallow. Both George and Charles were bricklayers on census returns. George’s brother Thomas was a baker and more recent Wilde family members in Hallow are descended from Thomas.
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William Charles SAMPSON, Able Seaman
Service No. J55370, Royal Navy HMS Impregnable

William Charles was born on 22 February 1900 in Birmingham. He and his brother Albert Henry were living with Horace and Phoebe Hewitt and their two children in Shoulton Lane, in 1911. Arthur and William were Horace’s stepbrothers. William C joined the Royal Navy as a Boy II on 14 July 1916. In February 1917 he joined the ship HMS Centurion which you can read about here

Whilst still on HMS Centurion William became an Able Seaman in August 1918, he spent the last months of the war on exercises and patrols in the North Sea. Centurion was then posted to the Mediterranean. William received the War Gratuity and continued in the Royal Navy, his final service on HMS Curlew was as an Able Seaman starting on 24 November 1922 and ending on 23 June 1923 at San Pedro, California. He should have served the full 12 years and it maybe that he jumped ship. There is an indistinct note which may relate to the need for his medals to be recovered. If anyone has information which they are willing to share we would be pleased to hear from them.
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Albert SANDERS, Private (1915) Corporal (1916) Sergeant (1918)
Service Nos. 11065 & 3757729, The King's (Liverpool) Rgt.

Albert was born c. 1889 in Salwarpe.  His parents were George (an agricultural labourer) and Jane nee Moule, and he lived in Pinch Cottages with his 4 brothers and 1 sister.  (By the Census of 1901, there was another brother who had been born, Frank, who was 4.  The family now lived in Church Lane, Hallow. Between the Census of 1901 and 1911, Albert's father died.  Albert volunteered c. October 1914, and enlisted April 1915, serving in the Asian Theatre of War.  His service record has not been found, his medal card showed that he was awarded the 1915 Star, the Victory and British War medals.
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Francis aka Frank SANDERS, Driver
Service Nos. 3710 & 846274, Royal Field Artillery/3rd Sect 61st (S.M.) D A C Col / O.C. 306 Bde R.F.A./2nd Sth Midland Brigade, R.F.A.

Frank was born in Hallow c. 1897, and the 1901 Census showed him living with parents George and Jane nee Moule, and 4 brothers and 1 sister. They lived in Church Lane, Hallow.  By the 1911 Census, his mother was widowed, and there was only Frank, and Jane's granddaughter living with her.  Frank was stated as aged 14 and a worker i.e. 'boy in garden'. He enlisted October 1915 and was posted to Havre, France in May 1916. He was wounded in action October 1918 (injuries to his wrist, knee and head, described as mild). He returned on leave to the UK in December and was forfeited 2 days’ pay for overstaying his leave by 2 days). In January 1919 he was sent to Chiseldon for demob. He received the British War and Victory Medals.
(Brother Albert is shown above, and George, John and William are below).
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George SANDERS, Staff Quartermaster Sergeant demoted to Corporal
Service No. S4/035896, Royal Army Service Corps

George Sanders was a baker, aged 30 living at 35 “Big Boughton Street” St Johns, Worcester with his wife Hester, nee Bright, and their five children when he enlisted in the Army on 26 November 1914.  He was one of the sons of George and Jane Sanders who were living in Church Lane, Hallow at the time of the 1901 census. George and his younger brother Albert were both born in Salwarpe. Albert also served in the Army but his Army record has not survived.  George was posted to the Army Service Corps A Depot on 27 November 1914 as a Baker and promoted to Corporal 18 February 1915 at H Depot, before embarking to Le Havre, France on SS Matheran. For more information, click here. 
Brothers Albert and Frank are shown above,  John and William are below.
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John SANDERS,
NZ Expeditionary Force

John was born c. 1875, the eldest son of George and Jane, nee Moule.  His family information is the same as for his brothers, shown above.  John was first noted in the Parish Magazine of September 1916 and he was recorded as being with the NZ Expeditionary Force.  His family tree on Ancestry shows that he was neither married or had children.  No other information has been found.  Brothers Albert, Frank and George are shown above, and William below)
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William SANDERS, Driver
Service Nos. 4274 & 831814, Royal Field Artillery

William was born in 1886.  His parents were George, an agricultural labourer, and Jane nee Moule.  His family history is the same as for Albert, Frank, George and John above.  William was a gardener at The Rhydd Lodge, Hanley Castle when he attested 10 December 1915.  He joined the 2 South Midland Bde., R.F.A. as a driver, and was mobilized 22 May 1916.  He married Minnie Ethel Sealcot Grubham on 22 January 1911, and later that year their daughter Sybil was born.  During mid 1917, his wife had 8 of her letters to William in Salonica returned due to an incorrect address, and she sought help from her local Army Pensions office in Upton upon Severn.  (Her husband had written to her asking why she had not communicated with him).  William was in Salonica from 11 December 1916 to 23 January 1919, when he returned to the UK.  He was discharged 31 February 1919.  His Pensions Sheet recorded he had ‘10% disability’ and a weekly pension was awarded from 25 April 1919 of 5s 6d (app. £13.63 in 2015) plus 2s 4d for two children (app. £5.70 in 2015).  ‘No bonus to be paid’.
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Robert William SHARP, Disciplinarian Tp SM (D) SM 1 / Staff Sergeant
Service No. 12163, Royal Flying Corps / AWO RAF

Robert was born in Oxford in 1893, son of Joseph ( a stonemason) and Emma Sharp of Park Cottage who moved to this area after the 1911 census.. Before joining the RFC he had served for 13 months in the 1 Battalion Grenadier Guards (He was 6ft 6ins). Robert was an Asylum Attendant before entering the RFC on 28 October 1915. He was promoted to Corporal in January 1916, Sergeant in June 1916, Flight Sergeant December 1916. He was then posted to RFC Canada, Camp Borden, which was the main training centre and in Canada he was promoted to Temporary Sgt Major in April 1917. Robert’s RFC trade was “Disciplinarian” on his military record, which is assumed to be a Drill Sergeant Major. On transfer to the RAF on 1 April 1918 he was a Sgt Major. He was with 42 W Can. If you can tell us what  “HQ Can 6” and “42 W Can” mean we will be pleased to hear from you. It seems that his military service ceased on 4 January 1919. Robert was awarded the British War Medal in 1927, some six years later than those who had served in the Army elsewhere.
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Allan Frederick SHEPHERD, Private
Killed in action 12th Oct. 1917
Service No. 38295, 55th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps

The Parish Magazine of November 1917 recorded the death of Allan - former footman at Parkfield. He enlisted in Worcester, and was killed in action 12th Oct. 1917, aged 24. Allan was born in Bermondsey, Middlesex, and was the son of Elizabeth and the late Mr. D. J. Shepherd, Hungerford.  He is buried in Cement House Cemetery, Belgium, Grave IX. D.20.  His medal record stated he enlisted 27 July 1915, France Theatre of War, and was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals.
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Edward SHEPHERD, Private
Service No. 1663, 9th Royal Warwickshire

Edward was mentioned in the Parish Magazine of April/May 1918and the Absent Voters List 1918 which recorded that he lived at Green Street, Hallow.  No other information has been found.
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Frank SHERIFF,
Service Nos. 120508 & 551859, Royal Army Medical Corps

Frank and Annie Shepherd and their four children were living in Lower Broadheath in 1911 where he was a labourer in a Nursery. His Army record stated that he was living in Tybridge Street on 12 June 1917 when he was called up aged 39 years 7 months   He was posted to the Labour Corps C Company and a month later to 20th Company Tidworth. The Labour Corps grew to about 10% of the Army and was made up of men who were not rated as A1. Frank had Rheumatism, a scar in his right groin and on the left an Inguinal hernia and was rated as B3 amended to B2. However in December 1917 he was transferred to RAMC Depot at Blackpool on 7 December and from there to the 8th Training Battalion RAMC. He was transferred again on 12 April 1918 to the 424th Agric. Coy. Depot, Worcs Regiment, Worcester.  Frank was stated to have a good character when he was demobilised in March 1919. He died in 1949.
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Henry SILLENCE, Private
Service No. 247246, 627th Agr. Co., Labour Corps.

The 627th Ag Co were in 1918 based at Worcs Reg Depot in Worcester & cultivated their gardens.  This could explain why his name was in our Parish Magazine.  Born c 1868, Henry joined in 1916, but was retained on important duties with his unit at various stations. Transferred to the Royal Defence Corps and afterwards to the Labour Corps, he rendered valuable services in motor ploughing and guarding German prisoners. He served until 1919, when he was demobilised. He originated from North Baddesley, nr Romsey, Hants. (The Absent Voters list 1919 recorded that he lived in Moseley Road.)  Brother Reginald is shown below, and also his father, William.
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Reginald SILLENCE,
Service No. 30743, 53rd Hampshire / Somerset Lt. Infantry

Born in Nursling, Southampton in 1900, Reginald joined in 1917 and after a short training, he was drafted to the Western Front, where he took a prominent part in many engagements, and was severely wounded on the Somme. He returned at the cessation of hositilities and was demobilised in October 1919. He was awarded the General Service and Victory Medals. His name appeared in the Parish Magazine of November/December 1918 and the Absent Voters List 1919 recorded that he lived in Moseley Road.  Brother Henry is shown above, and father William, below).
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William Henry SILLENCE,
Killed in action 13th August 1915
Service No. 10793, 13th Hampshire Regt

Born in Upton Grey, Hants. c 1882, William volunteered in September 1914, and on completion of his training was drafted to the Dardanelles. In the Landing from the "Royal Edward" he was lost when the ship was sunk. CWGC states 'died 13 Aug 1915, remembered Helles Memorial, Turkey, panel 125-134 or 223-226 228-229 & 328. Also North Baddesley War Memorial' (Name recorded in PN 1915 and 1919).  Sons Henry and Reginald are shown above.
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Arthur SMITH, 1st Class Stoker
Service No. K35242, HMS Victory/ HMS King George V

Arthur Smith was born on 20 September 1879 in Hallow. He was married to Sarah Jane Parker from Himbleton and they had a daughter Elsie by the start of the War. Arthur joined the Royal Navy in July 1916. He was a Stoker II attached to the land establishment HMS Victory until December of that year when he became a Stoker II on HMS George V which had earlier in the year taken part in the battle of Jutland. It was subsequently the battleship of the Home Fleet. Arthur became a Stoker Class 1 in March 1917 and remained with HMS George V until he was demobbed on 30 May 1919.
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Charles Henry SMITH, Private
Service Nos. 46152 & 897419, Duke of Cornwalls Light Infantry/ London Regt

Charles was born c. 1897, his father Charles was a gas works labourer, and his mother was named Susan.  He had 2 brothers, and one sister (Census 1911).  His address was recorded as Greenhill Lane, Camp Lane, Hallow.  Charles was an apprentice baker working at Hallow Bakery.  His medal record card recorded he was awarded the Victory medal.  As his name is first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of November/December 1918 he may have enlisted about that time. 
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Charles Henry SMITH,
Royal Field Artillery

Charles was first noted in the Parish Magazine of February 1915. Hallow.   Charles Henry Smith born 1896 was the son of John and Susan Smith nee Pittaway. They had four children and Charles was the eldest boy. Charles married Priscillla Ballinger and they had a son Samuel in 1922 who was Ann Ganderton’s father. Charles’ Army Service Record does not seem to have survived.  He lived in Camp Lane, Hallow.
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Freda SMITH, VAD Nurse,
Wilts. 8 Salisbury Red Cross Hospital & Countess of
Radnor's Officers Hospital

Record cards shown on the Red Cross website detail that Freda lived at The Furlong, Hallow at the time of joining the VAD Wilts. 8 and served from April 1915 to February 1919.  It is also recorded that she was a part-time nurse.
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Henry SMITH,
Service Nos. 171888 & 43680, 13th Devonshire Regt /
627th Agri. Company, Labour Corps

Henry Smith was born in All Saints parish on August 30 1890, his partner was Jessie Hopkins nee Rowberry who had a son James Hopkins and a daughter registered as Clara Ellen Hopkins. Henry enlisted on 24 October 1916 and (Clara) Ellen had only been born in September 1916. Initially Henry’s service number was 43680 in the Devonshire Regt, but he passed his Medical as B2 and was transferred to  310 HS Labour Works Company in Chiseldon, transferring again on 10 April 1918 to 627 Agricultural Coy Labour Corps Depot Worcester, Regimental number 171888. Unfortunately Agricultural Companies are not well documented and his Army record only indicates that in 1919 he was in Cologne Germany transferring to a number of A E Companies, although his record is stamped elsewhere with “OC 424th Agricultural Coy Labour Corps Depot Worcs Regiment”! He was evacuated to the UK at the end of 1919 and on discharge in March 1920, Henry’s home address was given as Moseley Road, Hallow.
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Martin Gwynne SMITH, Private
Service No. D/14440, 1st King's Dragoon Guards

Martin was born in 1876.  He had married Etheldreda M Landon in 1898. They had 3 surviving children by the time of the 1911 census when they were living at 185 Henwick Road, Worcester. In the 1911 Census, his occupation was given as horse breaker.
Martin's name was first mentioned in the Parish Magazine of March 1919. He was also recorded on the Absent Voters List of 1918. His medal card recorded that he was awarded the British War medal and Silver Badge, also that he enlisted on 10 December 1915 in the Kings Dragoon Guards as a Private and was discharged aged 42 on 6 November 1918. Cause of discharge Army Order vi. dated 14-9-18 & 392 xvi 2 (a). The Silver Badge number B81100 was issued on 30 January 1919. Martin died in 1942.
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Alfred James SOMERVILLE, Private
Died 26 March 1917
Service No. TR/7/6882, 93rd T.R. Gloucs. Regt.

Alfred as born in Hallow c. 1881.  His parents were William, and Annie.  (William was a printer compositor, later to become a Political Organising Agent - 1891).  Alfred had 4 brothers and 2 sisters.  In 1891 the family lived at Elbury Cottage, Tolladine Road, Worcester, and by 1901 had moved to West Ham, Essex.  At that time, Alfred was a boiler maker.  The Parish Magazine of April 1917 recorded that Alfred has died. CWGC states died 26 March 1917, buried Warkleigh St John churchyard, Devon.
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Albert John SPILSBURY, Private
Service No. 33114, 1/2/9th Worcs Regiment

Alfred was born c. 1884 in Wichenford.  His parents were Frederick, a farm labourer, and Mary, and he had a younger brother, Charles (Census 1891).  They lived at Poplar Road, Wichenford.  By 1901, Alfred was a servant at Brockhill Court Farm, Worcs. and in 1911, he was living at Kenswick Mill Cottage, Broadheath, working as a gamekeeper.  He married Louisa Price 25 January 1911 at Holt Church, and they had two children, Harold and Mary.  In 1916 the family lived at Archbell Cottage.  Alfred enlisted 29 June 1916.  His service record shows he served in Mesopotamia July 1917, and was in Salonika January 1919.  He was discharged in October 1919 suffering from 70% disability due to Malaria, and was given a disablement pension, inc. his wife and 2 children of 44s 5d (app. £110 in 2015) ‘to be reviewed in 26 weeks’.  There were two notifications of change of address in his record - January 1918 (Little Comberton, nr Pershore) and possibly during 1920 – a burnt record - (to Ockeridge).  He was awarded the British War and Victory medals.  Alfred’s death is registered in the Martley district September 1960 when he was aged 76.
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Alice May STALLARD, V.A.D. Nurse
Orthopaidic Hospital (spelt as it appears on her gravestone)
Northfield , Birmingham
Died after a short illness July 14, 1918

Alice lived at Moseley Turning, Hallow when she joined the J.W.V.A.D., Worcester Reserves on 24th August 1917.  She died after a short illness July 14, 1918 aged 25. a 1st Southern General Military certificate was sent to her next of kin. Alice taught in Hallow day and Sunday schools, when Mr. Bartlett was vicar, and she is buried in Hallow Churchyard.
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Frank Harold STALLARD, Driver
Service Nos. T4/084774 (RASC) & 20608 (W. Yorks), 310 Co. RASC (33 Reserve Park), 3rd/10th Bttn W Yorkshire Rgt, Army Veterinary Corps.

Frank was born 7 July 1899 to Charles Richard & Mary and lived at Moseley Turning, Hallow. He had two sisters, Annie & Edith. His father, known as Richard, was a baker and was assisted by his wife and eldest daughter, Annie. Frank was a carter and baker and enlisted April 1915. He gave his age as 19 yrs 273 days, when in fact he was only 15 yrs 9 mths. After training he was sent to France August 1915, and then Salonica February 1916. (In November 1915 he 'forfeited 3 days’ pay for (i) leaving stables without permission, and (ii) parading with dirty harness'.) He had various health problems during 1916 inc. pyrexia (high temperature) and scabies, and spent 64 days in hospital February to April '17 suffering with concussion. In November 1917 he was awarded 3rd Class Certificate of Education at Whitley Bay. (The Army became aware of his true age in 1917 and he was assessed as 'moderately intelligent'). He transferred to the 3rd West Yorks Rgt in April 1918, and posted to France, returning to UK in July suffering with influenza, later diagnosed as (Rheumatic?) fever and he was in hospital until 3 October 1918. He demobbed May 1919 and received the Bronze 1914-15 Star, Victory and British War medals.
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Henry STALLARD, Private
Service No. T/331159, Army Service Corps

His parents were John and Mary Stallard of Ashfields, Peachley. Before the War he had worked at Green Street Farm and at the time of the 1911 census was working for David Llewellyn Wall who was a baker in Lower Broadheath.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
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Richard William STALLARD,
37th Royal Engineers (American Expeditionary Force

Born on 22 February 1889, Richard was the son of Charles Stallard (a Baker) and his wife Mary Ann, nee Knowles, who were living at Moseley Turning in 1911. Richard had emigrated to the United States in 1910 and became a naturalised American in 1911. His World War I Draft Registration Card for 5 June 1917 indicates that he was a Railroad Conductor for the SF (San Francisco?)  Railway Company and employed in his home town of Oakland to the east of San Francisco Bay. Richard was tall, of medium build, with blue eyes and red hair. Hallow Parish Magazine indicated that he was in the 37th Royal Engineers. This is all the information that we have at the moment about his War service.  Richard appears on the 1920 American census with his wife Grayce Stallard nee Sheldon living in Oakland, Alameda, California.   They made several trips to the UK, and on at least one occasion in 1938 their two sons Richard (18) and Harold (17) accompanied them.
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Charles John STANLEY, Private
Service Nos. 2866 & 300231, 7/10th Worcs. Regiment

Charles a.k.a. John was born 17 September 1897 in Hallow to John (a labourer) and Sarah.  He had one sister (1911 Census) and they lived at 49 Comer Gardens, Worcester.  He enlisted 15 January 1916 aged 18, and received gunshot wounds resulting in the loss of his left arm.  He was treated in St Andrews Hospital, London.  He was discharged 2 October 1918.  His death was recorded as August 1987 when he would have been 89. For more information, click here.
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George Henry STOKES, Private
Service No. SE/3763, Army Service Corps / Army Veterinary Corps

George Henry Stokes may have been the father of John Stokes mentioned below.  If so he was born in St Johns c. 1876, the son of Thomas Stokes who had lived in Church Lane, Hallow.  At the time of the 1911 census he was living with his wife Mary Ann Stokes nee Taylor at “the Back of the School” with their five children.  His occupation was Farm Labourer.  As his Army Service Record has not survived the only information we have is from the Medal Card Index which shows he enlisted 24.1.1915 and he was awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.
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John STOKES, Private
Service Nos. 42 & 37946, Army Veterinary Corps / Somerset Lt Infantry (Jan 1918)

John enlisted 9 April 1915 and served in Egypt.  He was discharged 5.3.19 and was awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Victory medals.  It was reported in the Parish Magazine of September/October 1918 that John was a prisoner of war, held in Munster, Germany and he had sent a postcard to his mother, Mrs G. Stokes of School Lane to say that "he was well".  His address was given as 'back of school' i.e.  Ladygo Lane, Hallow.
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Frederick George STONE, Corporal
Died February 19th 1919
Service No. 46600 – 14th Devon Regt & No. 432701 Labour Corps

In the January 1917 Parish Magazine, Frederick is reported as 'in active service'.  Frederick died February 19, 1919 in Chisledon Hospital, Swindon.  He was accorded a military funeral on Feb 24th 1919.   He may have lived in Parkfield Lane.
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Sidney TANDY, Private & A/Sergeant
Service Nos. 45, TT02167, Army Veterinary Corps

Shown as Sydney J Tandy on his Medal Card, he was the son of James and Elizabeth Tandy who lived at Heath Hill, Queenhill, Worcs.  In the 1911 census he was living at home and was, like his brother, Walter, a gardener.  He enlisted 29 March 1915, and the Electoral Roll 1915 recorded he lived at Park Lane, rooms at Mrs Elizabeth Watkins.  He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals.
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Walter TANDY,
Army Reserve

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine of August 1916, Walter was probably a brother of Sidney Tandy, above.  Alternatively this could be William James Tandy’s father (see below).  Walter Tandy born 1868 of 20 Perdiswell Street, Worcester had served in the Worcestershire Regiment from 1884 for 12 years, his service record has survived.   It is possible that he would have been called up for the Army Reserve.

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William James TANDY, Private
Killed in action 6th July 1916
Service No. 14235, 2nd Worcs Regiment

The Parish Magazine of August 1917 recorded the death of William - killed in action 6th July 1916, age 22.   He was the son of Walter and Alice Tandy, 20 Perdiswell Street, Barbourne, Worcester, and brother of Mrs Blissett, Camp Lane, Hallow.  He is buried in Lillers Communal Cemetery, France, Grave V.C.21. 
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John THOMPSON, Private
Service No. 3789, 4th/6th Worcs Regiment

This serviceman was recorded in the Parish Magazine of July 1917 and also the Absent Voters List 1918 but no other information can be found.
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Frederick TYLER, Private
Service No. 27348, 5th/9th Worcs Regiment

Frederick was born in Hallow c. 1891 and lived in Parkfield Lane, Hallow with his parents George (farm labourer) and Mary, his two brothers and one sister (Census 1911). He was a baker journeyman. He joined the Army Reserve in December 1915 and was called up in Februay 1916. He was posted with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (Eastern Theatre) in June 1916 and in December was wounded in his right thigh (no other details given). In 1920 Frederick was in a Malarial Concentration Centre, and discharged from service in Jan 1920 on medical grounds (disability given as 'less than 20%'). He received the Victory and British War medals.  (For more of his service history, click here
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William TYLER,
Army Veterinary Corps

Mentioned in the Parish Magazine of September 1917 and the Electoral Roll 1915 – William lived in  Parkfield  Lane, Hallow. There are two servicemen on the Medal card index but it is not possible to identify which applies to this soldier.
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Reginald VINCENT, Private
Service Nos. 3862 & 241237, 2/8th Worcs Regiment

Reginald was born in Lower Wyche, Malvern, son of William and Lucy Vincent. Reginald had married Amy Burrow at Martin Hussingtree in 1911 and had three children by the time he enlisted on 23 January 1915. Before that he had been employed by Mr. Chance of Blackmore Park. Reginald was posted for general duties 2/8 Worcestershire Regiment. He was one of the lucky people to survive the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918. He was in the hospital at Norton Barracks near Worcester for 44 days and then transferred to 2/1 Southern T F Hospital in Dudley Road, Birmingham where he was examined by the Medical Board prior to Discharge or Transfer to the Reserve. He was disembodied on 22 February 1919 and it was stated that his military character was very good. His home address was then given as Camp Lane, Hallow. He had served for just over 4 years firstly training for over a year in the UK and then nearly three years were spent in France and Belgium.  He received the British War and Victory medals.
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William Henry WALKER, Private
Died May 1918
Service No. 41988, Leicestershire Yeomanry/ 7th Bn Leics Rgt

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine of October 1914, in April 1915 it was noted that he was 'in active service'. The April 1919 issue reported that he had died on May 1918, remembered on the Soissons Memorial, Aisne, France.  (William was born in Sheffield).  We do not know his connection with our area.
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Victor Harvey Willis WATTON, 2nd Lieutenant
61st Co., Chinese Labour Corps) 1923

Victor Harvey Willis Watton 1897-1984. His father was Walter Harvey a  Merchant Navy Captain, he had died at sea in 1899 and it has not been possible to find out where he was raised and went to school, although it is likely to have been in the Far East.  On  5th July 1917 he was made temporary 2nd Lieutenant, but no further information was provided in the London Gazette.  In 1923 he married Eva Nina Hill.
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James WEAVER,
Service No.  PLY/11954, Royal Marines HMS Diana

James was born on 2 February 1884, his widowed mother Mary lived in Summer Place, Oldbury Road, which was in Hallow Parish at that time. He enlisted as a Private in the Royal Marines in December 1902 and served until December 1923. In June 1905 he passed the test for a lamp trimmer, but may not have served as a Lamplighter until 1919. He married Maude L. Chaffe at Plymouth on 6 April 1908 and they had four daughters.  On 6 August 1914 he was on board HMS Diana which  captured a German schooner in the English Channel.
James remained with HMS Diana until November 1917 and saw more service in the Channel as part of the 12th Cruiser Squadron and from 1915 to August 1917 was on the China Station. He was in Hong Kong in December 1916 when he undertook one of the nine musketry courses of his long career. James also completed four gunnery training courses.   James returned to the UK in March 1917 to the Plymouth Division and received Good Conduct and Long Service medals. From March 1918 to January 1919 James was attached to the Auxillary Patrol Base at Inverness known as HMS Lavatera. Over the years the observations on James character were “very good” and his ability - “very good”, “satisfactory” or “supr”. In the 1920’s he received money from the Naval Prize Fund. Including his final share of £18-15-0 in May 1922.  James was awarded the 1914-15 Star, the Victory and British Medals.  In 1923 James transferred to the Royal Fleet Reserve (RFR), for which he would have received a retainer and could be called out at times of emergency. He was discharged from the RFR in 1934 when he reached the age of 50.
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Harold Algernon WEBB, Private / Sergeant
Service No. 240064, 8th Worcs Rgt, Territorial Army.

Harold was born in Weston under Wetherley in July 1892 to James (a farm bailiff) and Ellen Mary Anne and lived at 4 Ashcroft Road, Worcester (Census 1901). He had 2 sisters. In 1911 Census, he is shown to be living at Rose Cottage, Britannia Square, Worcester and he is an apprentice ironmonger, and his mother is a gloveress. He enlisted in August 1914 (his occupation now given as a Fitter, and also an Assurance Clerk?). By July 1915 he had been promoted to Sergeant. He was posted to France, and after 10 months became a prisoner of war in Germany. In February 1916 he sustained bomb wounds to a finger, and his left foot, resulting in amputation of two toes giving him 20% disability. His records state he 'had a poisoned stomach, due to bad food and exposure' (June '16). He returned to the UK in February 1919 and was discharged in April. In 1922 he married Christine Duggan at Hallow Church and they lived in Parkfield Lane with their 2 children. (For Harold's story, click here)
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Albert WEDGBURY, Sapper
Service No. 127650, RE Wireless Signal Co., East Africa.

Albert was born in 1895 and lived at 41 Tallow Hil .  He was an apprentice plater at Heenan & Froude, Worcester when he enlisted as a Sapper in the Royal Engineers on 27 November 1915. On 18 October 1916 Albert passed a Proficiency test at the Wireless Training Centre at Worcester. Three days later Heenan & Froude issued a certificate under Rule 7 of the Munitions (Leaving Certificate) Regulations 1916 as Albert had continued to undertake essential war work until that date. He was not attested until 24 October 1916.  Whilst in the Wireless Signals Company RE Albert served first as a Driver and later as a Fitter and received 6d a day this was increased to 1s a day. He had three spells in hospital in the UK before he embarked to Base Signal Depot East Africa in July 1917 travelling from Devonport via Durban to Dar es Salaam in present day Tanzania. He contracted malaria in June 1918 and was in hospital for a fortnight.  Unfortunately the details of his final posting are illegible, but he embarked from Dar es Salaam on 13 December 1918 and was demobilised from Chatham on 5 April 1919. Albert was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal.  Albert’s home address at the end of the War was 42 Little London, The Tything, Worcester As neither known address is in the Hallow area, he must have had a family member here who asked for him to be remembered in Intercessory prayers.
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Harry WESTBURY,
Service Nos. 7764 & 690422, 6th Worcs / D Co 5th Bttn when discharged/Labour Corps (1917)

Henry or Harry as he was known was born in 1881 the son of Henry and Frances Westbury nee Taylor, who had fourteen children. Henry was one of seven children shown living at home in Worcester in 1901. Harry first enlisted in April 1903 and served at home, in Ceylon and in 1908 in South Africa. He returned to the UK in October 1908 and married Florence Hammond at the Registry Office in Dover in 1910. Sometime after 1915 she came to live at Pound Cottage in Hallow with their two daughters Dorothy and Margaret.  He was then on home service until August 1914 when he was posted to France. Harry returned after 49 days, he was in France again for 48 days in March/May1915 but he received a gunshot wound to his right leg and then home until under King’s Regulations, he was discharged after 13 years service in April 1916 from Fort Tregantle, Antony near Plymouth. His military character was good and he was reliable and trustworthy. Harry was a bricklayer by trade and he intended to live at No 1 Fort Cottage, Broadstairs Kent, but another Army Record has been found for Harry which shows he was called up again on 30 January 1917 and was posted into the Labour Corps as a Lance Corporal Regimental number 690422. On 22 July he was diagnosed with neurasthenia (shell shock) attributed to his military service. The two reasons are shown one under the other with the word (buried) in between, so it’s not clear if 1) Injury to back or 2) Shattered nerves, relates to it. A further statement reads “B179 Epsom - still tremulous & c/o rheumatic”. He was given a detailed examination on 30 November 1920 and a Board on 8 November 1921. Sadly on11 August 1922 he died of gastritis. Harry’s wife Florence may have returned to home county of Kent and married William Wassall in 1923.
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William Charles WESTBURY, Gunner
Service No. 28868, Royal Garrison Artillery

William Charles Westbury 1885-1953.
In 1901 William was a sixteen year old stable boy working at Church Farm, Claines, by the time of the 1911 census he was stationed on Gibraltar where he married Geronima Espinsoa in 1916.  After the war they had two daughters Annie and Beatrice. William’s military record has not survived. It seems that he was a Worcester member of the National Union of Railway Workers in 1919 and again in 1925/6. This is all the information that we have, so we don’t know if he is the brother of Henry/Harry whose wife Florence lived at Pound Cottage.
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John Edward WHEELER, Gunner
Service Nos. 625656 RFA & 541870 Labour Corps
424 Company, Army Service Corps / Hon. Artillery Company

John was born 30 June 1897, son of John and Agnes Wheeler who lived at Heath Farm, Hallow.  He joined the Honourable Artillery Company on 17 February 1917 and was a Gunner with the 2/B Battery, British Expeditionary Force.  There are several lines of cramped abbreviations next to his name in HAC Regimental Numbers Registry from which it seems that the dates are shortened and don’t seem to include the year.  The only recognisable information is when John was with 17 RFA on 6 December 1917 and that he was later transferred to the Labour Corps.  First mentioned in the Parish magazine in January 1918 as being in Hallow on a short recuperative leave from hospital, it seems that his injury was such that he was no longer classed as A1 and was transferred to 424 Agricultural Labour Corps whose headquarters were in Worcester. John was awarded the British War and Victory medals.
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Charles Arthur WHILSMITH or WILESMITH, Driver / Yeoman of Signals
Died 27th May 1917
Service No. 222706, HMS Hindustan Royal Navy and HMS Liverpool

Charles was born on 23 May 1887 in Haddington near North Berwick, East Lothian. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Fanny Whilsmith of 3 Farley Street, Comer Gardens, St Johns. On his 18th birthday (23 May 1905) Charles joined the Royal Navy for 12 years as a “Signaller Boy He was attached to a variety of land base establishments and ships and in 1909 became a Leading Signaller. On 29 July 1914 Charles was on HMS Liverpool, a Light Cruiser and would have seen action at Heligoland Bight in August of that year. You can read about the ship here:-

From July 1915 to April 1916 John was attached to the shore base Victory I at Portsmouth, so we don’t know where he was serving. The Parish Magazine noted HMS Hindustan, which had been built in 1902 and his naval record showed the dates for Charles serving on that ship as 18 April 1916 to 31 March 1917. She formed part of the 3rd Battle Squadron, Home Fleet and was with Nore Command., John was attached again to Victory I and then back to HMS Hindustan from 14 May 1917 to 29 May when he committed suicide by cutting his throat. His record stated that the Courts of Enquiry concluded that “no blame was attributable to anyone”. The Parish Magazine stated that he died in Gillingham Hospital, Kent 27th May 1917 aged 30 and buried in Astwood Cemetery, Worcester.

(Courts of Enquiry records are held at The National Archives, Kew  in 3.2 ADM 1: Papers of the Admiralty Secretariat)
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Ernest Edwin WHITEHOUSE, Gunner
Service Nos. 27485 & 36127, Worcs Regiment /3 Bttn Machine Gun Corps

Ernest Edwin Whitehouse was born in Hartlebury in 1894, son of Edwin and Mary Compton Whitehouse. His connection with the Hallow area is not yet known. Having attested on 10 December 1915 Ernest was placed in the Reserves and mobilised in February 1916. He transferred in October 1916 to the Machine Gun Corps, 95 Company who were in France. In November 1917 Gunner Ernest Whitehouse was granted 15 days leave in the UK. He was then in the field with the 95 Company until he was wounded in action on 27 April 1918 whilst with the 5th Battalion. He returned to the Machine Gun Corps Base Depot at Camiers, before being returned to England on 30 April on the Ville de Liege. Ernest was admitted to Keighley War Hospital on 1 May 1918 with a gunshot wound to his left thigh plus several flesh wounds from shrapnel. After 71 days he was transferred to the 2nd Western General Hospital Manchester where he remained until 28 August 1918. Later the scar was over 7 ins long and 1 ins wide with some wasting of the muscle in the thigh and also the calf. He was posted back to Machine Gun Corps Depot Alnwick/Grantham and was discharged as no longer physically fit for War Service on 20 January 1919. Ernest was awarded a Silver Badge and granted a pension for one year. His case was then reviewed and he received a Gratuity of £45.
Edwin married Gladys Haynes in 1922 and died in Buckinghamshire in 1971
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Robert Samuel WHITING, Private
Service No. 27507, 14th Worcs Regt

Robert was born in 1888, son of Samuel Whiting, a Provisions Dealer and his wife Ann who lived at Kent House, Comer Gardens which was then part of Hallow. Robert was a 28 year old farm labourer before he was posted to the 14th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment on 1 March 1916. He was granted a 10 day furlough from 27 April 1918. Robert’s Army record shows that he had two blue chevrons (for overseas service – worn on the lower right arm) and one Wound stripe. Although not every page of his Record has survived we know from the Parish Magazine that he was gassed in 1916. Unusually the date that the serviceman’s will was returned him is stated as 3 April 1919 on the retained envelope. Robert was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal which he received in 1921.
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Alfred John WILCOCK, also spelt WILCOX, Second Lieutenant
Worcs Yeomanry

In 1911 Alfred John Wilcock (born 1894) was living in the family home at 71 Bromyard Road Worcester. His father Alfred was a builder from Lancashire who had married Alice Annie Hughes in Worcester in 1882. The London Gazette reported that Alfred was promoted to temporary Second Lieutenant on 8th February 1915. Unfortunately his military record has not survived, so that this is all the information we have at the moment.
(He may have married Grace Harris 1915.)
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Charles Samuel WILDE, Driver
Service No. 831825, Royal Field Artillery /1918-D/12 Res. Bd. RFA

Charles Samuel Wilde was born in Hallow 27th May 1877 and died aged 68 on 15th November 1945. He was one of the sons of Thomas and Harriet Wilde nee Smith.  Thomas was a baker and in 1881 the family were living at Shoulton Turn. By 1891 Charles was a Baker’s Assistant. On 30 April 1900 Charles married Alice Hewitt at St Clements, Nechells in the Aston area and the 1901 census indicates that they were living at 68 Butlin Street, Aston with Albert and Emily Sampson late Hewitt  (Alice’s mother), Horace, Earle and Harry Hewitt (Alice’s brothers) and Arthur and Emily’s young Sampson family – plus Arthur’s brother Frederick!  Several of these names appear in our WWI database.

By 1911 Charles - a general labourer - and Alice were back in Shoulton Lane with their growing family of five children, three having been born in Hallow since 1905. Five more children would be born in Hallow including Stanley who was born on 17 August 1919.

Although Charles' Army Service record has not survived we know from the  award to Charles of a Silver Badge number B31580 that he had enlisted on 11 December 1915 and was discharged from 2 Res Brigade (T) RFA . Sickness Para 392 (xvi) King’s Regulations 2(a). The Parish Magazine noted Charles had met with an accident 22 February 1917 and in a later edition stated that he was in hospital at St Elmo, Malta.  (Charles' grandson Neville has been able to give us more information about his service career - he initially was sent to the trenches in France, and then he was posted to Salonica, Greece, followed by Macedonia via Alexandria.  He returned on the hospital ship Wandilla, a converted Australian steamship built in 1912.)
Hospital Ship "Wandilla" 

The Silver Badge was awarded to Charles on 6 November 1918. It was issued to men who were honourably discharged, in Charles case because he was permanently physically unfit - Para 392 (xvi).

Charles was also awarded the British War and Victory medals.


(Brother Frank also served – he is to be found in the Broadheath records.)

Charles was an active member of the Hallow branch of the British Legion.

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George Ernest WILDE, Private
Service Nos. 7055 & 14930, Machine Gun Corps, South Wales Borderers

First mentioned in the Parish Magazine of May 1915, the January 1916 issue reported he was  'In hospital at Birkenhead, severely wounded'.  No other information has been found.
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Harold James WILDE, Private
Died of wounds 8th May 1915
Service No. 11480, 3rd / 4th Battalion Worcs Regiment

Harold was born in Hallow c .1890 to Thomas and Harriet who lived at Pool Cottage, Hallow Road. He had 2 sisters and 3 brothers (Census 1901) By the Census of 1911, Harold's father was not shown and Harriet was the head of the family. Francis enlisted in Worcester September 1914 to the 4th Worcester Regiment. When not in action, Harold lived with his brother Charles, wife Alice and family in Shoulton Lane. He died of wounds sustained in fighting in the Dardanelles, 8th May 1915 and was buried in the Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Turkey, Grave E. 10. The DCM (Distinguished Conduct Medal) is recorded on Hallow memorial, but there is no mention of this award on Commonwealth War Graves, 'Soldiers Died in the Great War' or the DCM citations. (Herbert G Mann also Worcs Regt who survived the War is the only recorded Hallow DCM). He received the Victory, 1915 Star and British War Medals.
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Henry George WILDING, Merchant Marine
H.M.Transport Palermo

Henry was born in Hallow in 1877, the son of William Wilding from Lancashire, a National Schoolmaster and his wife Mary nee Fortey, who was born in Hallow. In 1891 Harry was a boarder at Barbourne College in Worcester, whilst at the family home in Hallow Road, his sister Elizabeth was now a qualified National school teacher and her two younger sisters were pupil teachers.
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Charles, WILLIAMS, aka  F. R. Lewis, Private
Service No. 9263 / TS 1007 ? , A.S.C., Worcester Regiment (1914/5) / RFA (1916)

He worked as a farrier and was rated 'very good'. He enlisted under the name of "Charles Williams" September 1914 and was posted to France in October, returning in June 1915, and discharged in November as 'no longer physically fit for War service'. In March 1920, when applying for his War medals, he advised the authorities "that he had changed his name to his correct name by Statutory Declaration whilst serving with the R.F.A. and requesting all communications be sent to F. R. Lewis, of 75 Pheasant Street, Worcester. (He was awarded the 1914 Star) 
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Harold WILLIAMS, Captain
Killed in action April 25th 1917.
11th Service Bttn, Worcs Regt

Harold was born in 1894 or 1895 to Arthur and Elizabeth Williams. His father was born in the Hallow area but by 1911 the family were living at 41 St Dunstan's Crescent, Worcester. According to the 1911 census Harold did not follow into the family tailoring business, but was 'Assistant Master at Hallow Boys School' and he still lived at home with his parents. During the Great War he rose to the rank of Lieutenant (T. CAP) and later Captain. In 1917 he was serving in Macedonia in the Allied campaign to aid Serbia. He was killed in action in the First Battle of Doiran in Salonica, April 25th 1917.
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Harold T. WILLIS,
1/5 Royal West Surrey Regt

The Absent Voters List June 1918 recorded that Harold lived at 279 Henwick Road, Worcester.
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Frederick Joseph WITHEY, Private
Service Nos. 26802 & 42518, Gloucestershire Regiment / Worcestershire Regiment

Frederick, known as Fred, was born in 1879 in Hallow, the third son of William and Mary Withey nee Hadley.   In the 1911 census Fred was a coach painter boarding with his wife Elizabeth (nee Reynolds) and daughter Lilian, in Camp Lane, Hallow with James and Mary Mason.  His Army Service record has not survived and the only information we have is from the Medal Card Index which shows that he was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.
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Walter James WITHEY, Private
Service No. 36542, 1st /8th Worcs Regiment

Walter was born in 1898, son of Thomas and Amelia who in 1901 were living in Crowle. They had two children, Walter aged two, born in Hallow, and an un-named son under 1 month old. Only a slip in Army Service, records his name as being someone who had been injured and was transferred to DDM Rouen (no date)  
His Army Service record has not survived and the only information we have is from the Medal Card Index that he was awarded the British War & Victory Medals.
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William WITHEY, Private
Killed in action 8th July 1915
Service No. 10437, Royal Warks. Regiment

William was born in Hallow c. 1892, and in 1901 was living with his grandfather, W. E. Withey, grandmother Mary, and his four uncles and one aunt.  They lived at The Green, Hallow.  By the next Census of 1911, William was recorded as the adopted son of George and Susan Coleman, who lived at Baker Street, Small Heath, Warks.  (They also had another three sons and one daughter.)  William's occupation was a core maker for B.S.A. cycles.  He was at Shorncliffe 4 August 1914 with 10th Bde. 4th Div.  On 22 August 1914 they landed in France. William was killed in action 8 July 1915 (France & Flanders).  His Army Service record has not survived and the only information we have is from the Medal Card Index which confirms that he was killed in action and that he was posthumously awarded the 1814/15 Star, the British War & Victory Medal.
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Frank WOOD,
8th Worcs Regiment

Other than his name being recorded in the Parish Magazine of July 1917, no information can be found.
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John Henry WOODWARD, Sapper and Corporal (March '17))
Service Nos. 40070 & WR/286875, Depot, Worcester Regt. / 53 rd Railway Operations Div., R.E., Egyptian Expeditionary Force.

John was born in Hallow 1887 and enlisted in August 1914 aged 26. His mother was Emily Jane Woodward, and he had a sister and brother. He was a draughtsman, and lived at Upper Wick, Worcester. After training he was sent to France. In April 1915 he was at Bridon, Doncaster as he was recorded as 'absent without leave for 69 hrs', for which he was 'admonished. Later that year he was admitted to hospital (where this was and why is unknown). May 1916 he was at R.E. Railway Troops Depot, Longmoor, and in Sept 1916 he was posted to Alexandria. He was promoted to Corporal March 1917. August 1918, he was admitted to hospital with gastritus, followed by 'flu, not returning to service until October. He was demobbed June 1919. During his service his skills were upgraded from 'skilled' to 'superior' (Oct '17) and 'very superior' (April '19) with his pay adjusted accordingly. He received his Victory and British War medals in May 1922.
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William Charles Price WRIGHT, Lieutenant
Oxford & Bucks. Light Infantry

The Imperial War Museum’s  “Lives of the First World War” has further information about William’s military service.

RE Northumberland Fusiliers Corporal SN 1876; Northumberland Fusiliers Temp Lieutenant; RAOC Temporary Lieutenant; Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Regiment, Lieutenant.
William Charles Price Wright was born in Long Eaton Derby and was the son of Harry and Louise Wright. Harry was a nurseryman originally from Honiton in Devon and in 1911 the family were living at Upper Broadheath.

This is all the information we have at the moment.
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William H. B. YERBURGH, Chaplain
HMS Drake/HMS Campania/HMS Queen

William was born cc. 1881 in Epping, Essex - his father, Harry, was a brewer and wine merchant, and his mother was Sophia.  The census of 1891 recorded he had 2 sisters and a brother.  The family lived at Epping Brewery and had a governess and 3 servants.  He was ordained in 1904 and between 1910 and 1912, he was the curate in Hallow and lived at Altair, Parkfield Lane, Hallow with his two younger sisters.  In 1914 he was vicar, Leamington, Glos., and then Kineton, Warks., joining the Navy as a Chaplain in 1916.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  In 1925 he married Frances Wolryche-Whitmore at Tewkesbury Abbey and they had two daughters.  He died in June 1937.

(For more information, click here.)


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Acknowledgements:

Names of those servicemen who died during The Great War have been taken from church memorials in Hallow, Broadheath and Comer Gardens, also the Roll of Honour in Broadheath Village Hall. The website 'Remember The Fallen' has kindly given permission for us to use its research and record it with our own.


The archives held at The Hive, Worcester, and websites Ancestry co.uk and Find My Past have also been instrumental in our research, for which we are most grateful.